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Re: sometimes things are fuzzy!

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  • Thomas Collins Jr
    ... Red giants are stars of 0.4 to 10 times the mass of the Sun which have exhausted the supply of hydrogen in their cores and switched to fusing hydrogen in a
    Message 1 of 16 , Mar 5, 2007
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      --- In delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com, Douglas
      <jsbell.ontarget@...> wrote:
      >
      > "Studying Astronomy can lead to indigestion!"
      >
      Red giants are stars of 0.4 to 10 times the mass of the Sun which
      have exhausted the supply of hydrogen in their cores and switched to
      fusing hydrogen in a shell outside the core. Since the inert helium
      core has no source of energy of its own, it contracts and heats up,
      and its gravity compresses the hydrogen in the layer immediately
      above it, thus causingfff it to fuse faster. This in turn causes the
      star to become more luminous (from 1,000 to 10,000 times brighter)
      and expand; the degree of expansion outstrips the increase in
      luminosity, thus causing the effective temperature to decrease. In
      stars massive enough to ignite helium fusion, an analogous process
      occurs when central helium is exhausted and the star switches to
      fusing helium in a shell, although with the additional complication
      that in many cases hydrogen fusion will continue in a shell at lesser
      depth — this puts stars onto the asymptotic giant branch and are
      called red supergiants.[1][2] The decrease in surface temperature
      shifts the star's visible light output to the red — hence red giant.
      Stars of spectral types O through K are believed to become red giants
      (or supergiants in the case of O and B stars).

      Stellar evolution begins with a giant molecular cloud (GMC), also
      known as a stellar nursery. Most of the 'empty' space inside a galaxy
      actually contains around 0.1 to 1 particle per cm³, but inside a GMC,
      the typical density is a few million particles per cm³. A GMC
      contains 100,000 to 10,000,000 times as much mass as our Sun by
      virtue of its size: 50 to 300 light years across.

      As a GMC orbits the galaxy, one of several events might occur to
      cause its gravitational collapse. GMCs may collide with each other,
      or pass through dense regions of spiral arms. A nearby supernova
      explosion can also be a trigger, sending shocked matter into the GMC
      at very high speeds. Finally, galactic collisions can trigger massive
      bursts of star formation as the gas clouds in each galaxy are
      compressed and agitated by the collision.

      A collapsing GMC fragments as it collapses, breaking into smaller and
      smaller chunks. In these fragments, the gas is heated as it collapses
      due to the release of gravitational potential energy, and the cloud
      becomes a protostar as it forms into a spherical rotating object.

      This initial stage of stellar existence is almost invariably hidden
      away deep inside dense clouds of gas and dust left over from the GMC.
      Often, these star-forming cocoons can be seen in silhouette against
      bright emission from surrounding gas, and are then known as Bok
      globules.

      Very small protostars never reach temperatures high enough for
      nuclear fusion of hydrogen to begin; these are brown dwarfs of less
      than 0.075 solar mass (the exact boundary between stars and brown
      dwarfs depends upon chemical composition, with increased heavy
      element concentrations moving the limit lower; 0.075 is the current
      estimate of this boundary for an object of approximately solar
      chemical composition). Brown dwarfs heavier than 13 Jupiter masses
      (MJ) do fuse deuterium, and some astronomers prefer to call only
      these objects brown dwarfs, classifying anything larger than a planet
      but smaller than this a sub-stellar object. Both types, deuterium-
      burning or not, shine dimly and die away slowly, cooling gradually
      over hundreds of millions of years. The central temperature in more
      massive protostars, however, will eventually reach 10 megakelvins, at
      which point hydrogen begins to fuse by way of the proton-proton chain
      reaction to deuterium and then to helium. In stars of slightly over 1
      solar mass, the CNO cycle contributes a considerable portion of the
      energy generation. The onset of nuclear fusion leads over a
      relatively short time to a hydrostatic equilibrium in which energy
      released by the core prevents further gravitational collapse. The
      star thus evolves rapidly to a stable state.


      This is from my text book in Cosmology that I am taking.
      Hope it helps...

      Regards,

      Tom Collins Jr, WI3P

      Celestron C8-SGT /Nextar CG-5 Mount
      Meade 290 60mm Refractor EQ Manual Mount
      38.5714N 75.2875W Millsboro, Delaware USA
      "Pluto will always be a Planet to me!!!"
    • Douglas
      many times I am fuzzy, too, but that s another story... ... -- A good conscience is a continual feast Robert Burton many times I am fuzzy, too, but that s
      Message 2 of 16 , Mar 6, 2007
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        many times I am fuzzy, too, but that's another story...

        On 3/5/07, Thomas Collins Jr <tom041652@... > wrote:

        --- In delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com, Douglas
        <jsbell.ontarget@...> wrote:
        >
        > "Studying Astronomy can lead to indigestion!"
        >
        Red giants are stars of 0.4 to 10 times the mass of the Sun which
        have exhausted the supply of hydrogen in their cores and switched to
        fusing hydrogen in a shell outside the core. Since the inert helium
        core has no source of energy of its own, it contracts and heats up,
        and its gravity compresses the hydrogen in the layer immediately
        above it, thus causingfff it to fuse faster. This in turn causes the
        star to become more luminous (from 1,000 to 10,000 times brighter)
        and expand; the degree of expansion outstrips the increase in
        luminosity, thus causing the effective temperature to decrease. In
        stars massive enough to ignite helium fusion, an analogous process
        occurs when central helium is exhausted and the star switches to
        fusing helium in a shell, although with the additional complication
        that in many cases hydrogen fusion will continue in a shell at lesser
        depth — this puts stars onto the asymptotic giant branch and are
        called red supergiants.[1][2] The decrease in surface temperature
        shifts the star's visible light output to the red — hence red giant.
        Stars of spectral types O through K are believed to become red giants
        (or supergiants in the case of O and B stars).

        Stellar evolution begins with a giant molecular cloud (GMC), also
        known as a stellar nursery. Most of the 'empty' space inside a galaxy
        actually contains around 0.1 to 1 particle per cm³, but inside a GMC,
        the typical density is a few million particles per cm³. A GMC
        contains 100,000 to 10,000,000 times as much mass as our Sun by
        virtue of its size: 50 to 300 light years across.

        As a GMC orbits the galaxy, one of several events might occur to
        cause its gravitational collapse. GMCs may collide with each other,
        or pass through dense regions of spiral arms. A nearby supernova
        explosion can also be a trigger, sending shocked matter into the GMC
        at very high speeds. Finally, galactic collisions can trigger massive
        bursts of star formation as the gas clouds in each galaxy are
        compressed and agitated by the collision.

        A collapsing GMC fragments as it collapses, breaking into smaller and
        smaller chunks. In these fragments, the gas is heated as it collapses
        due to the release of gravitational potential energy, and the cloud
        becomes a protostar as it forms into a spherical rotating object.

        This initial stage of stellar existence is almost invariably hidden
        away deep inside dense clouds of gas and dust left over from the GMC.
        Often, these star-forming cocoons can be seen in silhouette against
        bright emission from surrounding gas, and are then known as Bok
        globules.

        Very small protostars never reach temperatures high enough for
        nuclear fusion of hydrogen to begin; these are brown dwarfs of less
        than 0.075 solar mass (the exact boundary between stars and brown
        dwarfs depends upon chemical composition, with increased heavy
        element concentrations moving the limit lower; 0.075 is the current
        estimate of this boundary for an object of approximately solar
        chemical composition). Brown dwarfs heavier than 13 Jupiter masses
        (MJ) do fuse deuterium, and some astronomers prefer to call only
        these objects brown dwarfs, classifying anything larger than a planet
        but smaller than this a sub-stellar object. Both types, deuterium-
        burning or not, shine dimly and die away slowly, cooling gradually
        over hundreds of millions of years. The central temperature in more
        massive protostars, however, will eventually reach 10 megakelvins, at
        which point hydrogen begins to fuse by way of the proton-proton chain
        reaction to deuterium and then to helium. In stars of slightly over 1
        solar mass, the CNO cycle contributes a considerable portion of the
        energy generation. The onset of nuclear fusion leads over a
        relatively short time to a hydrostatic equilibrium in which energy
        released by the core prevents further gravitational collapse. The
        star thus evolves rapidly to a stable state.

        This is from my text book in Cosmology that I am taking.
        Hope it helps...

        Regards,

        Tom Collins Jr, WI3P

        Celestron C8-SGT /Nextar CG-5 Mount
        Meade 290 60mm Refractor EQ Manual Mount
        38.5714N 75.2875W Millsboro, Delaware USA
        "Pluto will always be a Planet to me!!!"




        --
        "A good conscience is a continual feast"
        Robert Burton
      • Douglas
        Thank you, Tom. One is always learning, all one s life. I thought I knew the outline of Red Giants until I started reading up, and found that I did not know so
        Message 3 of 16 , Mar 6, 2007
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          Thank you, Tom.

          One is always learning, all one's life.

          I thought I knew the outline of Red Giants
          until I started reading up, and found that I did not
          know so much after all!

          In any case, thanks for your prompt input.

          Doug

          P.S. It might still lead to indigestion, of course,
          but its nice to have people to talk things over with...

          On 3/5/07, Thomas Collins Jr <tom041652@...> wrote:

          --- In delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com, Douglas
          <jsbell.ontarget@...> wrote:
          >
          > "Studying Astronomy can lead to indigestion!"
          >
          Red giants are stars of 0.4 to 10 times the mass of the Sun which
          have exhausted the supply of hydrogen in their cores and switched to
          fusing hydrogen in a shell outside the core. Since the inert helium
          core has no source of energy of its own, it contracts and heats up,
          and its gravity compresses the hydrogen in the layer immediately
          above it, thus causingfff it to fuse faster. This in turn causes the
          star to become more luminous (from 1,000 to 10,000 times brighter)
          and expand; the degree of expansion outstrips the increase in
          luminosity, thus causing the effective temperature to decrease. In
          stars massive enough to ignite helium fusion, an analogous process
          occurs when central helium is exhausted and the star switches to
          fusing helium in a shell, although with the additional complication
          that in many cases hydrogen fusion will continue in a shell at lesser
          depth — this puts stars onto the asymptotic giant branch and are
          called red supergiants.[1][2] The decrease in surface temperature
          shifts the star's visible light output to the red — hence red giant.
          Stars of spectral types O through K are believed to become red giants
          (or supergiants in the case of O and B stars).

          Stellar evolution begins with a giant molecular cloud (GMC), also
          known as a stellar nursery. Most of the 'empty' space inside a galaxy
          actually contains around 0.1 to 1 particle per cm³, but inside a GMC,
          the typical density is a few million particles per cm³. A GMC
          contains 100,000 to 10,000,000 times as much mass as our Sun by
          virtue of its size: 50 to 300 light years across.

          As a GMC orbits the galaxy, one of several events might occur to
          cause its gravitational collapse. GMCs may collide with each other,
          or pass through dense regions of spiral arms. A nearby supernova
          explosion can also be a trigger, sending shocked matter into the GMC
          at very high speeds. Finally, galactic collisions can trigger massive
          bursts of star formation as the gas clouds in each galaxy are
          compressed and agitated by the collision.

          A collapsing GMC fragments as it collapses, breaking into smaller and
          smaller chunks. In these fragments, the gas is heated as it collapses
          due to the release of gravitational potential energy, and the cloud
          becomes a protostar as it forms into a spherical rotating object.

          This initial stage of stellar existence is almost invariably hidden
          away deep inside dense clouds of gas and dust left over from the GMC.
          Often, these star-forming cocoons can be seen in silhouette against
          bright emission from surrounding gas, and are then known as Bok
          globules.

          Very small protostars never reach temperatures high enough for
          nuclear fusion of hydrogen to begin; these are brown dwarfs of less
          than 0.075 solar mass (the exact boundary between stars and brown
          dwarfs depends upon chemical composition, with increased heavy
          element concentrations moving the limit lower; 0.075 is the current
          estimate of this boundary for an object of approximately solar
          chemical composition). Brown dwarfs heavier than 13 Jupiter masses
          (MJ) do fuse deuterium, and some astronomers prefer to call only
          these objects brown dwarfs, classifying anything larger than a planet
          but smaller than this a sub-stellar object. Both types, deuterium-
          burning or not, shine dimly and die away slowly, cooling gradually
          over hundreds of millions of years. The central temperature in more
          massive protostars, however, will eventually reach 10 megakelvins, at
          which point hydrogen begins to fuse by way of the proton-proton chain
          reaction to deuterium and then to helium. In stars of slightly over 1
          solar mass, the CNO cycle contributes a considerable portion of the
          energy generation. The onset of nuclear fusion leads over a
          relatively short time to a hydrostatic equilibrium in which energy
          released by the core prevents further gravitational collapse. The
          star thus evolves rapidly to a stable state.

          This is from my text book in Cosmology that I am taking.
          Hope it helps...

          Regards,

          Tom Collins Jr, WI3P

          Celestron C8-SGT /Nextar CG-5 Mount
          Meade 290 60mm Refractor EQ Manual Mount
          38.5714N 75.2875W Millsboro, Delaware USA
          "Pluto will always be a Planet to me!!!"




          --
          "A good conscience is a continual feast"
          Robert Burton
        • Thomas Collins Jr
          ... (Portions Deleted To Save Time) Since I went out on early disability retirement, it has given me full time to study things and go to classes that I never
          Message 4 of 16 , Mar 7, 2007
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            --- In delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com, Douglas
            <jsbell.ontarget@...> wrote:
            >
            > Thank you, Tom.
            >
            > One is always learning, all one's life.
            >
            > I thought I knew the outline of Red Giants
            > until I started reading up, and found that I did not
            > know so much after all!
            (Portions Deleted To Save Time)

            Since I went out on early disability retirement, it has given me full
            time to study things and go to classes that I never thought I would
            be able to. I have always had a interest in Math, Physics,
            Electronics, Computers, Astronomy and Cosmology. Now I have 7 days a
            week to study and learn all the things I always wanted. Right now I
            am auditing classes in Precalculus and Astronomical Physics. I hope
            by summer to finish my Calculus class then I want to read and
            understand Richard Feynman's Thesis he wrote. It's sitting on my
            bookshelf collecting dust right now.

            I thought I was busy working 60-70 hour shifts at DuPont Experimental
            Station, but find I am more busy now than ever. I am lucky that my
            wife understands all this and that at 54, I hope to do a lot and
            maybe contribute something to astronomy by my Double/Multiple and
            Variable measurements. Maybe I'll even get my name/initials in the
            WDC or USNO catalogs. But that is secondary to increasing my own
            knowledge.

            Not sure what books you are studying, but the Textbook I used in my
            first and second class on General Astronomy is Discovering The
            Universe By Neil F. Comins and William J. Kaufmann III ISBN 0-7167-
            6960-3. Not only is it a excellent Text for class but its great as a
            reference.

            Clear Skies For You,

            Regards,

            Tom Collins Jr, WI3P

            Celestron C8-SGT /Nextar CG-5 Mount
            Meade 290 60mm Refractor EQ Manual Mount
            38.5714N 75.2875W Millsboro, Delaware USA
            "Pluto will always be a Planet to me!!!"
          • Douglas
            Hi, Tom Great to hear of your efforts regarding learning! One should never stop, and its so nice to hear that you re following that pathway. What is your
            Message 5 of 16 , Mar 7, 2007
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              Hi, Tom

              Great to hear of your efforts regarding learning!

              One should never stop, and its so nice to hear that
              you're following that pathway.

              What is your disability, by the way? It doesn't
              seem to be slowing you down in any case.

              I am a bit younger, although I suppose I feel
              "middle aged": I am 42. I seem to a little
              on the overweight side, and I have occaisional
              heart irrythmia, but otherwise I am ok.

              Certainly calculus and astronomy are central and
              stimulating places to start a beachhead, if you will.

              I hope that you and the late professor R.P. Feynman come
              to see eye to eye, very soon!

              Textbooks I own: I also have Comins and Kaufman,
              I have Zeilik, and also Seeds.

              C and K is far more "to the point": you have to wade through alot
              in Zeilik to get what C and K does in half a page.

              On the other hand Zeilik really makes the material "jump off
              the page" with his presentation.

              Seeds is the most philosophical of the three (If it comes to
              that, cannot one perhaps accuse professors Comins
              and Kaufman being too dry? I think they have a serious
              lack of pizzazz, if you will....).

              Also I should mention "Universe" edited by Martin Rees.
              Not a text, but has alot of reference material, all the same,
              and even some facts omitted by the textbooks.

              Best,
              Doug

              I take the opposite side on Pluto, but such is life. Win some,
              lose some.

              On 3/7/07, Thomas Collins Jr <tom041652@...> wrote:

              --- In delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com, Douglas
              <jsbell.ontarget@...> wrote:
              >
              > Thank you, Tom.
              >
              > One is always learning, all one's life.
              >
              > I thought I knew the outline of Red Giants
              > until I started reading up, and found that I did not
              > know so much after all!
              (Portions Deleted To Save Time)

              Since I went out on early disability retirement, it has given me full
              time to study things and go to classes that I never thought I would
              be able to. I have always had a interest in Math, Physics,
              Electronics, Computers, Astronomy and Cosmology. Now I have 7 days a
              week to study and learn all the things I always wanted. Right now I
              am auditing classes in Precalculus and Astronomical Physics. I hope
              by summer to finish my Calculus class then I want to read and
              understand Richard Feynman's Thesis he wrote. It's sitting on my
              bookshelf collecting dust right now.

              I thought I was busy working 60-70 hour shifts at DuPont Experimental
              Station, but find I am more busy now than ever. I am lucky that my
              wife understands all this and that at 54, I hope to do a lot and
              maybe contribute something to astronomy by my Double/Multiple and
              Variable measurements. Maybe I'll even get my name/initials in the
              WDC or USNO catalogs. But that is secondary to increasing my own
              knowledge.

              Not sure what books you are studying, but the Textbook I used in my
              first and second class on General Astronomy is Discovering The
              Universe By Neil F. Comins and William J. Kaufmann III ISBN 0-7167-
              6960-3. Not only is it a excellent Text for class but its great as a
              reference.

              Clear Skies For You,

              Regards,

              Tom Collins Jr, WI3P

              Celestron C8-SGT /Nextar CG-5 Mount
              Meade 290 60mm Refractor EQ Manual Mount
              38.5714N 75.2875W Millsboro, Delaware USA
              "Pluto will always be a Planet to me!!!"




              --
              "A good conscience is a continual feast"
              Robert Burton
            • tony codella
              Holy Crap! Is the whole textbook like that? Far as I can tell, it s an unassailable proof that God doesn t micro-manage the universe. Even with infinite time,
              Message 6 of 16 , Mar 7, 2007
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                Holy Crap! Is the whole textbook like that? Far as I can tell, it's an unassailable proof that God doesn't micro-manage the universe. Even with infinite time, he'd run out of patience.
                Tony


                Bored stiff? Loosen up...
                Download and play hundreds of games for free on Yahoo! Games.
              • Douglas
                I don t know about Tom, but your comment leaves me scratching my head. Which textbook, and what exactly do you mean by your remarks? Doug ... -- A good
                Message 7 of 16 , Mar 7, 2007
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                  I don't know about Tom, but your comment
                  leaves me scratching my head.

                  Which textbook, and what exactly do you mean
                  by your remarks?

                  Doug

                  On 3/7/07, tony codella <tonytowels@...> wrote:

                  Holy Crap! Is the whole textbook like that? Far as I can tell, it's an unassailable proof that God doesn't micro-manage the universe. Even with infinite time, he'd run out of patience.
                  Tony


                  Bored stiff? Loosen up...
                  Download and play hundreds of games for free on Yahoo! Games.




                  --
                  "A good conscience is a continual feast"
                  Robert Burton
                • Thomas Collins Jr
                  Well, I will try to answer two questions with one post. As to my disability, I have a disease called Bipolar I (Manic/Depression) and have a Anxiety/Panic
                  Message 8 of 16 , Mar 8, 2007
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                    Well, I will try to answer two questions with one post. As to my
                    disability, I have a disease called Bipolar I (Manic/Depression) and
                    have a Anxiety/Panic disorder. After a couple of breakdowns at work
                    DuPont thought it would be safer to put me out on Total and Permanent
                    Disability. I have been hospitalized a few times, but not since
                    April 2000. I have been seeing a Psychiatrist and Therapist since
                    about 1992 after my first episode. I'm doing OK now and have asked
                    several times about going back to work, but the Doctor says no way.
                    Too much stress and pressure. I keep in touch with the guys I worked
                    with at DuPont and it seems the 12th floor downtown is putting the
                    squeeze on the Company Retirement Program and the Bonus situation.

                    Now as to what I wrote about Red Giants and Nebula. Our sun falls in
                    the category that in about 10,000,000 years its fusion generator
                    (Helium and Hydrogen) will start to slow down. When this happens it
                    loses its ability to gravitationally to hold itself together. The
                    surface will start to cool and the star will start to swell. The
                    prediction is it will swell out engulfing out to Earth or Mars. The
                    temperature will drop from its present 5700K to about 1500K and will
                    be a Red Giant. This lasts about a million years then it starts to
                    collapse to a Brown Drawf then eventually dying, as a inert mass.

                    As to Nebula, these are star nurseries. Between gravity and the
                    pressure from Super Nova explosions new stars are made. I don't know
                    about other life, but we as humans could not live in a Nebula. The
                    first Super Nova burst puts out so much Gamma Radiation we'd all be
                    fried. In fact, I was watching a show on the Science Channel, Cosmic
                    Odyssey, and they said if our nearest star Alpha Centauri(?) went
                    Super Nova we would get a lethal dose of Gamma Radiation that very
                    few life forms would survive. (I could be wrong on the star, but I
                    think I'm right).

                    So that's it...time to eat now.

                    Clear Skies To All
                    Regards,

                    Tom Collins Jr, WI3P

                    Celestron C8-SGT /Nextar CG-5 Mount
                    Meade 290 60mm Refractor EQ Manual Mount
                    38.5714N 75.2875W Millsboro, Delaware USA
                    "Pluto will always be a Planet to me!!!"



                    --- In delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com, tony codella
                    <tonytowels@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Holy Crap! Is the whole textbook like that? Far as I can tell, it's
                    an unassailable proof that God doesn't micro-manage the universe.
                    Even with infinite time, he'd run out of patience.
                    > Tony
                    >
                    >
                    > ---------------------------------
                    > Bored stiff? Loosen up...
                    > Download and play hundreds of games for free on Yahoo! Games.
                    >
                  • Thomas Collins Jr
                    I won t go any further into this and I don t mean to step on any toes. TOM COLLINS OPINION FOLLOWS: YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED!!! I converted to the Catholic
                    Message 9 of 16 , Mar 9, 2007
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                      I won't go any further into this and I don't mean to step on any toes.

                      "TOM COLLINS OPINION FOLLOWS: YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED!!!"

                      I converted to the Catholic Church in April 2000. I have a Strong
                      and Firm belief in the Trinity. I don't believe in evolution, we did
                      not come from apes and the Big Bang IMHO was God snapping his fingers
                      to start this thing we call the Universe.

                      The biggest problem in Physics today is combining the Theory of
                      Relativity and Quantum Mechanics. The problem they are running into
                      is the Randomness of particle behavior in QM which is a no-no in
                      Relativity. Also, they have been unable to grasp the gravitation
                      energy wave and work it into their calculations of Theory of
                      Relativity.

                      IMHO they "Physicists" will never get beyond where they are now, I
                      believe 1 Second after the Big Bang, why? How does one work God into
                      an equation. I believe it was Steven Hawking that said something
                      like "I want to look into the mind of God." When talking about
                      solving the Big Bang.

                      As I said, my Opinion and that and $2.50 will get you a cup of coffee!

                      Clear Skies To All
                      Regards,

                      Tom Collins Jr, WI3P

                      Celestron C8-SGT /Nextar CG-5 Mount
                      Meade 290 60mm Refractor EQ Manual Mount
                      38.5714N 75.2875W Millsboro, Delaware USA
                      "Pluto will always be a Planet to me!!!"



                      --- In delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com, tony codella
                      <tonytowels@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Holy Crap! Is the whole textbook like that? Far as I can tell, it's
                      an unassailable proof that God doesn't micro-manage the universe.
                      Even with infinite time, he'd run out of patience.
                      > Tony
                      >
                      >
                      > ---------------------------------
                      > Bored stiff? Loosen up...
                      > Download and play hundreds of games for free on Yahoo! Games.
                      >
                    • Thomas Collins Jr
                      Another good course is from The Teaching Company. Understanding the Universe: An Introduction to Astronomy 2nd Edition. Its taught by Alex Filippenko (If you
                      Message 10 of 16 , Mar 9, 2007
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                        Another good course is from The Teaching Company.

                        Understanding the Universe: An Introduction to Astronomy 2nd Edition.
                        Its taught by Alex Filippenko (If you watch any of the Science
                        Channel Astronomy Series you'll see his mug lots)

                        The course is a bit pricey $190 for the DVDs, but its 96 30minute
                        lectures, sort of like a at home college course. Also on Nova, PBS,
                        I think early Wednesday mornings they are in the middle of a
                        Astronomy and Observation Theory course. I use my DVR box to record
                        everything then record those I want to keep for future reference on
                        DVD. Right now I have about 30-40 4 hour DVDs just with astronomy
                        stuff.

                        Clear Skies To All
                        Regards,

                        Tom Collins Jr, WI3P

                        Celestron C8-SGT /Nextar CG-5 Mount
                        Meade 290 60mm Refractor EQ Manual Mount
                        38.5714N 75.2875W Millsboro, Delaware USA
                        "Pluto will always be a Planet to me!!!"
                      • Douglas
                        clearly you have access to some special inside track, because the catalog I got shows Filepenko II for over $200!!! I m not sure how you qualified to get your
                        Message 11 of 16 , Mar 9, 2007
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                          clearly you have access to some special inside track,
                          because the catalog I got shows Filepenko II for
                          over $200!!!

                          I'm not sure how you qualified to get your discount,
                          on that deal!

                          But yes, Filepenko is great as I menioned in my previous
                          post.

                          I will have to look for that Nova, Thomas.

                          On 3/9/07, Thomas Collins Jr <tom041652@...> wrote:

                          Another good course is from The Teaching Company.

                          Understanding the Universe: An Introduction to Astronomy 2nd Edition.
                          Its taught by Alex Filippenko (If you watch any of the Science
                          Channel Astronomy Series you'll see his mug lots)

                          The course is a bit pricey $190 for the DVDs, but its 96 30minute
                          lectures, sort of like a at home college course. Also on Nova, PBS,
                          I think early Wednesday mornings they are in the middle of a
                          Astronomy and Observation Theory course. I use my DVR box to record
                          everything then record those I want to keep for future reference on
                          DVD. Right now I have about 30-40 4 hour DVDs just with astronomy
                          stuff.

                          Clear Skies To All
                          Regards,

                          Tom Collins Jr, WI3P

                          Celestron C8-SGT /Nextar CG-5 Mount
                          Meade 290 60mm Refractor EQ Manual Mount
                          38.5714N 75.2875W Millsboro, Delaware USA
                          "Pluto will always be a Planet to me!!!"




                          --
                          "A good conscience is a continual feast"
                          Robert Burton
                        • Douglas
                          Tom: You are in good company, as there are many who are inspired to the stars based on spiritual considerations. There is a reverend in Australia who is the
                          Message 12 of 16 , Mar 9, 2007
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Tom:

                            You are in good company, as there are many who are inspired
                            to the stars based on spiritual considerations.

                            There is a reverend in Australia who is the champion amatuer
                            supernova hunter.

                            Doug

                            On 3/9/07, Thomas Collins Jr <tom041652@...> wrote:

                            I won't go any further into this and I don't mean to step on any toes.

                            "TOM COLLINS OPINION FOLLOWS: YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED!!!"

                            I converted to the Catholic Church in April 2000. I have a Strong
                            and Firm belief in the Trinity. I don't believe in evolution, we did
                            not come from apes and the Big Bang IMHO was God snapping his fingers
                            to start this thing we call the Universe.

                            The biggest problem in Physics today is combining the Theory of
                            Relativity and Quantum Mechanics. The problem they are running into
                            is the Randomness of particle behavior in QM which is a no-no in
                            Relativity. Also, they have been unable to grasp the gravitation
                            energy wave and work it into their calculations of Theory of
                            Relativity.

                            IMHO they "Physicists" will never get beyond where they are now, I
                            believe 1 Second after the Big Bang, why? How does one work God into
                            an equation. I believe it was Steven Hawking that said something
                            like "I want to look into the mind of God." When talking about
                            solving the Big Bang.

                            As I said, my Opinion and that and $2.50 will get you a cup of coffee!

                            Clear Skies To All
                            Regards,

                            Tom Collins Jr, WI3P

                            Celestron C8-SGT /Nextar CG-5 Mount
                            Meade 290 60mm Refractor EQ Manual Mount
                            38.5714N 75.2875W Millsboro, Delaware USA
                            "Pluto will always be a Planet to me!!!"

                            --- In delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com, tony codella
                            <tonytowels@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Holy Crap! Is the whole textbook like that? Far as I can tell, it's
                            an unassailable proof that God doesn't micro-manage the universe.
                            Even with infinite time, he'd run out of patience.
                            > Tony
                            >
                            >
                            > ---------------------------------
                            > Bored stiff? Loosen up...
                            > Download and play hundreds of games for free on Yahoo! Games.
                            >




                            --
                            "A good conscience is a continual feast"
                            Robert Burton
                          • Don R Surles
                            First, I want to state that I truly enjoy observing, making telescopes, astro photography, and amateur astronomers. Second, I want to say that anytime I want
                            Message 13 of 16 , Mar 9, 2007
                            • 0 Attachment

                              First, I want to state that I truly enjoy observing, making telescopes, astro photography, and amateur astronomers.

                              Second, I want to say that anytime I want to take a nap all I have to do is put an astronomy tape, cd, program on the tv and bam! i am out in less than 5 minutes.
                              Every recorded program, other than Star Hustler, is so poorly done - shame on the professional astro community.  Our professional astronomers should learn from Carl Sagan and Gene Roddenberry and liven up their presentations.  Fillipenko included!

                              Third, nothing beats the real thing.. Get yourself and your scope under the stars.  

                              Don...




                              Douglas <jsbell.ontarget@...>
                              Sent by: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com

                              03/09/2007 11:29 AM

                              Please respond to
                              delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com

                              To
                              delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com
                              cc
                              Subject
                              Re: [delmarvastargazers] Re: sometimes things are fuzzy!






                              clearly you have access to some special inside track,
                              because the catalog I got shows Filepenko II for
                              over $200!!!

                              I'm not sure how you qualified to get your discount,
                              on that deal!

                              But yes, Filepenko is great as I menioned in my previous
                              post.

                              I will have to look for that Nova, Thomas.

                              On 3/9/07, Thomas Collins Jr <tom041652@...> wrote:

                              Another good course is from The Teaching Company.

                              Understanding the Universe: An Introduction to Astronomy 2nd Edition.
                              Its taught by Alex Filippenko (If you watch any of the Science
                              Channel Astronomy Series you'll see his mug lots)

                              The course is a bit pricey $190 for the DVDs, but its 96 30minute
                              lectures, sort of like a at home college course. Also on Nova, PBS,
                              I think early Wednesday mornings they are in the middle of a
                              Astronomy and Observation Theory course. I use my DVR box to record
                              everything then record those I want to keep for future reference on
                              DVD. Right now I have about 30-40 4 hour DVDs just with astronomy
                              stuff.

                              Clear Skies To All
                              Regards,

                              Tom Collins Jr, WI3P

                              Celestron C8-SGT /Nextar CG-5 Mount
                              Meade 290 60mm Refractor EQ Manual Mount
                              38.5714N 75.2875W Millsboro, Delaware USA
                              "Pluto will always be a Planet to me!!!"




                              --
                              "A good conscience is a continual feast"
                              Robert Burton


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                            • Douglas
                              Well, my feeling is that its always good to have strong passions about ideas, but its never good to attack individuals in and of themselves. Its just not right
                              Message 14 of 16 , Mar 9, 2007
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                                Well, my feeling is that its always good to have strong
                                passions about ideas, but its never good to attack
                                individuals in and of themselves.

                                Its just not right to say "shame on you!" to
                                professional astronomers, or really most any
                                professional group for that matter (unless we consider
                                lawyers? : )  ).

                                You can attack the job they did, without attacking
                                them as individuals.

                                Best,
                                Doug

                                On 3/9/07, Don R Surles <Don.R.Surles-1@...> wrote:


                                First, I want to state that I truly enjoy observing, making telescopes, astro photography, and amateur astronomers.

                                Second, I want to say that anytime I want to take a nap all I have to do is put an astronomy tape, cd, program on the tv and bam! i am out in less than 5 minutes.
                                Every recorded program, other than Star Hustler, is so poorly done - shame on the professional astro community.  Our professional astronomers should learn from Carl Sagan and Gene Roddenberry and liven up their presentations.  Fillipenko included!

                                Third, nothing beats the real thing.. Get yourself and your scope under the stars.  

                                Don...




                                Douglas <jsbell.ontarget@gmail.com>
                                Sent by: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com

                                03/09/2007 11:29 AM


                                To
                                delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com
                                cc

                                Subject
                                Re: [delmarvastargazers] Re: sometimes things are fuzzy!








                                clearly you have access to some special inside track,
                                because the catalog I got shows Filepenko II for
                                over $200!!!

                                I'm not sure how you qualified to get your discount,
                                on that deal!

                                But yes, Filepenko is great as I menioned in my previous
                                post.

                                I will have to look for that Nova, Thomas.

                                On 3/9/07, Thomas Collins Jr <tom041652@... > wrote:

                                Another good course is from The Teaching Company.

                                Understanding the Universe: An Introduction to Astronomy 2nd Edition.
                                Its taught by Alex Filippenko (If you watch any of the Science
                                Channel Astronomy Series you'll see his mug lots)

                                The course is a bit pricey $190 for the DVDs, but its 96 30minute
                                lectures, sort of like a at home college course. Also on Nova, PBS,
                                I think early Wednesday mornings they are in the middle of a
                                Astronomy and Observation Theory course. I use my DVR box to record
                                everything then record those I want to keep for future reference on
                                DVD. Right now I have about 30-40 4 hour DVDs just with astronomy
                                stuff.

                                Clear Skies To All
                                Regards,

                                Tom Collins Jr, WI3P

                                Celestron C8-SGT /Nextar CG-5 Mount
                                Meade 290 60mm Refractor EQ Manual Mount
                                38.5714N 75.2875W Millsboro, Delaware USA
                                "Pluto will always be a Planet to me!!!"




                                --
                                "A good conscience is a continual feast"
                                Robert Burton


                                This communication is for use by the intended recipient and contains
                                information that may be Privileged, confidential or copyrighted under
                                applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby
                                formally notified that any use, copying or distribution of this e-mail,
                                in whole or in part, is strictly prohibited. Please notify the sender by
                                return e-mail and delete this e-mail from your system. Unless explicitly
                                and conspicuously designated as "E-Contract Intended", this e-mail does
                                not constitute a contract offer, a contract amendment, or an acceptance
                                of a contract offer. This e-mail does not constitute a consent to the
                                use of sender's contact information for direct marketing purposes or for
                                transfers of data to third parties.

                                Francais Deutsch Italiano Espanol Portugues Japanese Chinese Korean

                                http://www.DuPont.com/corp/email_disclaimer.html




                                --
                                "A good conscience is a continual feast"
                                Robert Burton
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