Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [delmarvastargazers] 2 queries: goto a goto? where are the planetariums?

Expand Messages
  • Steven Long
    ... Doug, the Orion Intelliscope that I think we re all talking about is a Dobsonian-style scope with the addition of digital setting circles. Most Dobsonian
    Message 1 of 17 , Nov 5, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Douglas Hemmick wrote:

      >
      >
      > I do appreciate very much the thoughtful and detailed advice
      > Jean-Paul and Rodney!
      >
      > How can one go wrong with wise people to talk to?
      >
      > Perhaps one of the best choices is the Orion intelliscope described by
      > Jean-Paul?
      >
      > I think what I will do from here is to investigate the capabilities of
      > the Orion scope without the computer. What I wonder is simply:
      > can one aim the scope by inputting directional data somehow?
      >
      > Thanks again.
      >
      >

      Doug, the Orion Intelliscope that I think we're all talking about is a
      Dobsonian-style scope with the addition of digital setting circles. Most
      Dobsonian telescopes are reflector scopes with simple alt-azimuth platform
      mounts and are not motorized; and these are no different.

      Without the hand-held computer model, you must know exactly where in the sky
      to point the scope (by hand) to see a particular object. This is easy if the
      object is visible to the naked eye, or in a finder scope or Telrad. If it
      isn't visible, then you must star-hop or otherwise aim the telescope to find
      your target. Once the target is located, you must move the scope by hand to
      track it as the Earth rotates.

      With the handheld computer module, the only thing that changes is that, once
      you align the scope to the sky above you and ask to see one of the 14,000
      objects in the computer's data base, the computer display will tell you
      whether to push the scope tube *by hand* left or right, up or down, to find
      what you are looking for. When the computer says "stop pushing," the object
      should be in or near the field of view in the eyepiece. Once you acquire the
      target, the Intelliscope still requires that you move the tube *by hand* to
      follow your target object. *You* are the telescope's "drive motor."

      Go to www.telescope.com and check out the specs on the Intelliscope 8" and 10"
      models. If you can get by without motors on your scope, I think that either
      of these will be a good choice for you.

      Steve
    • Douglas Hemmick
      actually, I think I can show in this case that the opposite of your claim is true. I do not need naked eye visibility, if I know the coordinates I seek, and
      Message 2 of 17 , Nov 5, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        actually, I think I can show in this case that the opposite of your claim is true.

        I do not need naked eye visibility, if I know the coordinates I seek, and that is easy to obtain via the what I know from my home macintosh computer and the "Voyager" program, which gives me coordinates as accuately as I want...

        On 11/5/06, Steven Long <longsteven@...> wrote:
        Douglas Hemmick wrote:

        >
        >
        > I do appreciate very much the thoughtful and detailed advice
        > Jean-Paul and Rodney!
        >
        > How can one go wrong with wise people to talk to?
        >
        > Perhaps one of the best choices is the Orion intelliscope described by
        > Jean-Paul?
        >
        > I think what I will do from here is to investigate the capabilities of
        > the Orion scope without the computer. What I wonder is simply:
        > can one aim the scope by inputting directional data somehow?
        >
        > Thanks again.
        >
        >

        Doug, the Orion Intelliscope that I think we're all talking about is a
        Dobsonian-style scope with the addition of digital setting circles.  Most
        Dobsonian telescopes are reflector scopes with simple alt-azimuth platform
        mounts and are not motorized; and these are no different.

        Without the hand-held computer model, you must know exactly where in the sky
        to point the scope (by hand) to see a particular object.  This is easy if the
        object is visible to the naked eye, or in a finder scope or Telrad.  If it
        isn't visible, then you must star-hop or otherwise aim the telescope to find
        your target.  Once the target is located, you must move the scope by hand to
        track it as the Earth rotates.

        With the handheld computer module, the only thing that changes is that, once
        you align the scope to the sky above you and ask to see one of the 14,000
        objects in the computer's data base, the computer display will tell you
        whether to push the scope tube *by hand* left or right, up or down, to find
        what you are looking for.  When the computer says "stop pushing," the object
        should be in or near the field of view in the eyepiece.  Once you acquire the
        target, the Intelliscope still requires that you move the tube *by hand* to
        follow your target object.  *You* are the telescope's "drive motor."

        Go to www.telescope.com and check out the specs on the Intelliscope 8" and 10"
        models.  If you can get by without motors on your scope, I think that either
        of these will be a good choice for you.

        Steve



        Yahoo! Groups Links

        <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/delmarvastargazers/

        <*> Your email settings:
            Individual Email | Traditional

        <*> To change settings online go to:
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/delmarvastargazers/join
            (Yahoo! ID required)

        <*> To change settings via email:
            mailto:delmarvastargazers-digest@yahoogroups.com
            mailto: delmarvastargazers-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

        <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            delmarvastargazers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

        <*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
            http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/





        --
        "A good conscience is a continual feast"
        Robert Burton
      • Steven Long
        ... I used to find all the things I couldn t see in the sky using the visual setting circles on my Celestron C-8. Once I leveled the platform and got a good
        Message 3 of 17 , Nov 5, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          Douglas Hemmick wrote:
          > actually, I think I can show in this case that the opposite of your
          > claim is true.
          >
          > I do not need naked eye visibility, if I know the coordinates I seek,
          > and that is easy to obtain via the what I know from my home macintosh
          > computer and the "Voyager" program, which gives me coordinates as
          > accuately as I want...
          >
          >

          I used to find all the things I couldn't see in the sky using the visual
          setting circles on my Celestron C-8. Once I leveled the platform and got a
          good polar alignment of the scope's rotational axis, most things I wanted to
          find ended up in the 1-degree field of view of my Pentax 40, and the rest were
          usually no more than a half-degree away. I attribute this to the very useable
          setting circles on my C-8's equatorial mount. The right ascension circle in
          particular was about 8" in diameter >and< rotated with the motor drive; so I
          could easily swing the scope to a dec/RA coordinate point and be pretty sure
          that I was there.

          A standard Dobsonian has a rotating box platform that sits level on the ground
          with a pair of swivel points that let the telescope tube move in altitude.
          Think of how a howitzer is aimed. (And all you Dob owners, this is not to put
          down the DOB design. Please be aware that my next telescope, whenever I get
          it, will be a 10" Intelliscope.) No part of a standard DOB rotates in
          alignment with celestial North. I don't believe it would be possible to
          attach dec/RA circles, because the scope doesn't move along celestial
          coordinate lines, and is not polar aligned.

          The Orion Intelliscope platform has senders located around the two pivot
          points which count "steps." When the computer is attached, movement of the
          scope tube in altitude or azimuth sends information to the computer about how
          many "steps" the tube has been moved in either plane. This is how the
          computer "knows" where the scope is pointing, or how far and in what direction
          it needs to be moved to locate a target (assuming it has previously been
          aligned with the sky.)

          If you buy the hand computer that goes with the Orion Intelliscope, I
          >believe< it will let you enter the dec/RA coordinates for, say, the Eskimo
          Nebula, and it will tell you how to move the telescope to find that object.
          But if you have the Intelliscope, you could more easily tell it to find the
          Eskimo Nebula (which is probably in the computer's database,) and end up in
          the same place in the sky. You should only need coordinates for things that
          are not in the computer's database, like new comets, supernovae, and such.

          I think that without the Intelliscope computer, celestial coordinates and
          names are meaningless on an Orion DOB, because there isn't any way to align
          the scope and platform with the celestial coordinate grid.

          It might be possible to place a 360-point compass rose on the box and a 0-90
          degree scale on the tube pivot, so that if you aligned north on the base to
          North (probably true North -- you don't want a north that wobbles around the
          sky) and could get your dec/RA coordinates convertyed to bearing
          angle/altitude angle, it would work.


          Steve
        • Douglas Hemmick
          Steven: the business of using a dob with digital circles was due to Jean-Paul, so maybe he can get in on the debate, perhaps...? at this point, I have my eyes
          Message 4 of 17 , Nov 5, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            Steven:

            the business of using a dob with digital circles was due to Jean-Paul, so maybe he can get in on the debate, perhaps...?

            at this point, I have my eyes on a meade etx 80 mm refractor with autostar.

            I don't see that this is such a bad little scope,
            even if its a mere 80mm aperature.

            remember that Charlie Brown's christmas tree was eventually seen as the greatest thing there was...  : )

            the scope:

            http://www.shutan.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=1&Product_Code=250-5391&Category_Code=telcat5

            Doug

            On 11/5/06, Steven Long <longsteven@...> wrote:
            Douglas Hemmick wrote:
            > actually, I think I can show in this case that the opposite of your
            > claim is true.
            >
            > I do not need naked eye visibility, if I know the coordinates I seek,
            > and that is easy to obtain via the what I know from my home macintosh
            > computer and the "Voyager" program, which gives me coordinates as
            > accuately as I want...
            >
            >

            I used to find all the things I couldn't see in the sky using the visual
            setting circles on my Celestron C-8.  Once I leveled the platform and got a
            good polar alignment of the scope's rotational axis, most things I wanted to
            find ended up in the 1-degree field of view of my Pentax 40, and the rest were
            usually no more than a half-degree away.  I attribute this to the very useable
            setting circles on my C-8's equatorial mount.  The right ascension circle in
            particular was about 8" in diameter >and< rotated with the motor drive; so I
            could easily swing the scope to a dec/RA coordinate point and be pretty sure
            that I was there.

            A standard Dobsonian has a rotating box platform that sits level on the ground
            with a pair of swivel points that let the telescope tube move in altitude.
            Think of how a howitzer is aimed.  (And all you Dob owners, this is not to put
            down the DOB design.  Please be aware that my next telescope, whenever I get
            it, will be a 10" Intelliscope.)  No part of a standard DOB rotates in
            alignment with celestial North.  I don't believe it would be possible to
            attach dec/RA circles, because the scope doesn't move along celestial
            coordinate lines, and is not polar aligned.

            The Orion Intelliscope platform has senders located around the two pivot
            points which count "steps."  When the computer is attached, movement of the
            scope tube in altitude or azimuth sends information to the computer about how
            many "steps" the tube has been moved in either plane.  This is how the
            computer "knows" where the scope is pointing, or how far and in what direction
            it needs to be moved to locate a target (assuming it has previously been
            aligned with the sky.)

            If you buy the hand computer that goes with the Orion Intelliscope, I
            >believe< it will let you enter the dec/RA coordinates for, say, the Eskimo
            Nebula, and it will tell you how to move the telescope to find that object.
            But if you have the Intelliscope, you could more easily tell it to find the
            Eskimo Nebula (which is probably in the computer's database,) and end up in
            the same place in the sky.  You should only need coordinates for things that
            are not in the computer's database, like new comets, supernovae, and such.

            I think that without the Intelliscope computer, celestial coordinates and
            names are meaningless on an Orion DOB, because there isn't any way to align
            the scope and platform with the celestial coordinate grid.

            It might be possible to place a 360-point compass rose on the box and a 0-90
            degree scale on the tube pivot, so that if you aligned north on the base to
            North (probably true North -- you don't want a north that wobbles around the
            sky) and could get your dec/RA coordinates convertyed to bearing
            angle/altitude angle, it would work.


            Steve



            Yahoo! Groups Links

            <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/delmarvastargazers/

            <*> Your email settings:
                Individual Email | Traditional

            <*> To change settings online go to:
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/delmarvastargazers/join
                (Yahoo! ID required)

            <*> To change settings via email:
                mailto:delmarvastargazers-digest@yahoogroups.com
                mailto: delmarvastargazers-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

            <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                delmarvastargazers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

            <*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
                http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/





            --
            "A good conscience is a continual feast"
            Robert Burton
          • Don R Surles
            surles rule of thumb...buy no scope less than 10 in aperture...a 10 dob is your best buy...has been for 25 years. Don.. Douglas Hemmick
            Message 5 of 17 , Nov 6, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              surles' rule of thumb...buy no scope less than 10" in aperture...a 10" dob is your best buy...has been for 25 years.

              Don..



              "Douglas Hemmick" <jsbell.ontarget@...>
              Sent by: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com

              11/05/2006 10:51 PM

              Please respond to
              delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com

              To
              delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com
              cc
              Subject
              Re: [delmarvastargazers] 2 queries: goto a goto? where are the planetariums?





              Steven:

              the business of using a dob with digital circles was due to Jean-Paul, so maybe he can get in on the debate, perhaps...?

              at this point, I have my eyes on a meade etx 80 mm refractor with autostar.

              I don't see that this is such a bad little scope,
              even if its a mere 80mm aperature.

              remember that Charlie Brown's christmas tree was eventually seen as the greatest thing there was...  : )

              the scope:

              http://www.shutan.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=1&Product_Code=250-5391&Category_Code=telcat5

              Doug

              On 11/5/06, Steven Long <longsteven@...> wrote:
              Douglas Hemmick wrote:
              > actually, I think I can show in this case that the opposite of your
              > claim is true.
              >
              > I do not need naked eye visibility, if I know the coordinates I seek,
              > and that is easy to obtain via the what I know from my home macintosh
              > computer and the "Voyager" program, which gives me coordinates
              as
              > accuately as I want...
              >
              >

              I used to find all the things I couldn't see in the sky using the visual
              setting circles on my Celestron C-8.  Once I leveled the platform and got a
              good polar alignment of the scope's rotational axis, most things I wanted to
              find ended up in the 1-degree field of view of my Pentax 40, and the rest were
              usually no more than a half-degree away.  I attribute this to the very useable
              setting circles on my C-8's equatorial mount.  The right ascension circle in
              particular was about 8" in diameter >and< rotated with the motor drive; so I
              could easily swing the scope to a dec/RA coordinate point and be pretty sure
              that I was there.

              A standard Dobsonian has a rotating box platform that sits level on the ground
              with a pair of swivel points that let the telescope tube move in altitude.
              Think of how a howitzer is aimed.  (And all you Dob owners, this is not to put
              down the DOB design.  Please be aware that my next telescope, whenever I get
              it, will be a 10" Intelliscope.)  No part of a standard DOB rotates in
              alignment with celestial North.  I don't believe it would be possible to
              attach dec/RA circles, because the scope doesn't move along celestial
              coordinate lines, and is not polar aligned.

              The Orion Intelliscope platform has senders located around the two pivot
              points which count "steps."  When the computer is attached, movement of the
              scope tube in altitude or azimuth sends information to the computer about how
              many "steps" the tube has been moved in either plane.  This is how the
              computer "knows" where the scope is pointing, or how far and in what direction
              it needs to be moved to locate a target (assuming it has previously been
              aligned with the sky.)

              If you buy the hand computer that goes with the Orion Intelliscope, I
              >believe< it will let you enter the dec/RA coordinates for, say,
              the Eskimo
              Nebula, and it will tell you how to move the telescope to find that object.
              But if you have the Intelliscope, you could more easily tell it to find the
              Eskimo Nebula (which is probably in the computer's database,) and end up in
              the same place in the sky.  You should only need coordinates for things that
              are not in the computer's database, like new comets, supernovae, and such.

              I think that without the Intelliscope computer, celestial coordinates and
              names are meaningless on an Orion DOB, because there isn't any way to align
              the scope and platform with the celestial coordinate grid.

              It might be possible to place a 360-point compass rose on the box and a 0-90
              degree scale on the tube pivot, so that if you aligned north on the base to
              North (probably true North -- you don't want a north that wobbles around the
              sky) and could get your dec/RA coordinates convertyed to bearing
              angle/altitude angle, it would work.


              Steve



              Yahoo! Groups Links

              <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
                 
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/delmarvastargazers/

              <*> Your email settings:
                 Individual Email | Traditional

              <*> To change settings online go to:
                 
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/delmarvastargazers/join
                 (Yahoo! ID required)

              <*> To change settings via email:
                 mailto:
              delmarvastargazers-digest@yahoogroups.com
                 mailto:
              delmarvastargazers-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

              <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                 
              delmarvastargazers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

              <*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
                 
              http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/





              --
              "A good conscience is a continual feast"
              Robert Burton

              This communication is for use by the intended recipient and contains
              information that may be Privileged, confidential or copyrighted under
              applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby
              formally notified that any use, copying or distribution of this e-mail,
              in whole or in part, is strictly prohibited. Please notify the sender by
              return e-mail and delete this e-mail from your system. Unless explicitly
              and conspicuously designated as "E-Contract Intended", this e-mail does
              not constitute a contract offer, a contract amendment, or an acceptance
              of a contract offer. This e-mail does not constitute a consent to the
              use of sender's contact information for direct marketing purposes or for
              transfers of data to third parties.
              
              Francais Deutsch Italiano  Espanol  Portugues  Japanese  Chinese  Korean
              
                         http://www.DuPont.com/corp/email_disclaimer.html
              
            • Norton Douglas (DTI)
              I got my 10-inch Dob for $300. I spent another $300 for a complete set of Meade Series 4000 Plössl eyepieces. I carry one set of charts. I can t imagine
              Message 6 of 17 , Nov 6, 2006
              • 0 Attachment

                I got my 10-inch Dob for $300. I spent another $300 for a complete set of Meade Series 4000 Plössl eyepieces. I carry one set of charts.

                 

                I can’t imagine buying an 80mm scope. That’s too small and you will not enjoy it after a few months. Just my 2 cents worth.

                 

                And besides, the Meade 80mm scope is not a TMB or a William Optics quality scope either. You will soon find out its shortcomings. I concur with Don’s 2 cents. Buy big. Now you have 4 cents worth of advice.

                 

                Douglas A. Norton

                Department of Technology & Information

                System Administrator

                William Penn Data Center

                Phone: 302-739-9604

                Fax: 302-739-3925


                From: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com [mailto: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Don R Surles
                Sent: Monday, November 06, 2006 7:21 AM
                To: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [delmarvastargazers] 2 queries: goto a goto? where are the planetariums?

                 


                surles' rule of thumb...buy no scope less than 10" in aperture...a 10" dob is your best buy...has been for 25 years.

                Don..


                "Douglas Hemmick" <jsbell.ontarget@ gmail.com>
                Sent by: delmarvastargazers@ yahoogroups. com

                11/05/2006 10:51 PM

                Please respond to
                delmarvastargazers@ yahoogroups. com

                To

                delmarvastargazers@ yahoogroups. com

                cc

                 

                Subject

                Re: [delmarvastargazers ] 2 queries: goto a goto? where are the planetariums?

                 

                 

                 




                Steven:

                the business of using a dob with digital circles was due to Jean-Paul, so maybe he can get in on the debate, perhaps...?

                at this point, I have my eyes on a meade etx 80 mm refractor with autostar.

                I don't see that this is such a bad little scope,
                even if its a mere 80mm aperature.

                remember that Charlie Brown's christmas tree was eventually seen as the greatest thing there was...  : )

                the scope:

                http://www.shutan. com/Merchant2/ merchant. mv?Screen= PROD&Store_Code=1&Product_Code= 250-5391&Category_Code= telcat5

                Doug

                On 11/5/06, Steven Long <longsteven@comcast. net> wrote:
                Douglas Hemmick wrote:

                > actually, I think I can show in this case that the opposite of your
                > claim is true.
                >
                > I do not need naked eye visibility, if I know the coordinates I seek,
                > and that is easy to obtain via the what I know from my home macintosh
                > computer and the "Voyager" program, which gives me coordinates
                as
                > accuately as I want...
                >
                >

                I used to find all the things I couldn't see in the sky using the visual
                setting circles on my Celestron C-8.  Once I leveled the platform and got a
                good polar alignment of the scope's rotational axis, most things I wanted to
                find ended up in the 1-degree field of view of my Pentax 40, and the rest were
                usually no more than a half-degree away.  I attribute this to the very useable
                setting circles on my C-8's equatorial mount.  The right ascension circle in
                particular was about 8" in diameter >and< rotated with the motor drive; so I
                could easily swing the scope to a dec/RA coordinate point and be pretty sure
                that I was there.

                A standard Dobsonian has a rotating box platform that sits level on the ground
                with a pair of swivel points that let the telescope tube move in altitude.
                Think of how a howitzer is aimed.  (And all you Dob owners, this is not to put
                down the DOB design.  Please be aware that my next telescope, whenever I get
                it, will be a 10" Intelliscope. )  No part of a standard DOB rotates in
                alignment with celestial North.  I don't believe it would be possible to
                attach dec/RA circles, because the scope doesn't move along celestial
                coordinate lines, and is not polar aligned.

                The Orion Intelliscope platform has senders located around the two pivot
                points which count "steps."  When the computer is attached, movement of the
                scope tube in altitude or azimuth sends information to the computer about how
                many "steps" the tube has been moved in either plane.  This is how the
                computer "knows" where the scope is pointing, or how far and in what direction
                it needs to be moved to locate a target (assuming it has previously been
                aligned with the sky.)

                If you buy the hand computer that goes with the Orion Intelliscope, I
                >believe< it will let you enter the dec/RA coordinates for, say, the
                Eskimo
                Nebula, and it will tell you how to move the telescope to find that object.
                But if you have the Intelliscope, you could more easily tell it to find the
                Eskimo Nebula (which is probably in the computer's database,) and end up in
                the same place in the sky.  You should only need coordinates for things that
                are not in the computer's database, like new comets, supernovae, and such.

                I think that without the Intelliscope computer, celestial coordinates and
                names are meaningless on an Orion DOB, because there isn't any way to align
                the scope and platform with the celestial coordinate grid.

                It might be possible to place a 360-point compass rose on the box and a 0-90
                degree scale on the tube pivot, so that if you aligned north on the base to
                North (probably true North -- you don't want a north that wobbles around the
                sky) and could get your dec/RA coordinates convertyed to bearing
                angle/altitude angle, it would work.


                Steve



                Yahoo! Groups Links

                <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
                   http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/delmarvast argazers/

                <*> Your email settings:
                   Individual Email | Traditional

                <*> To change settings online go to:
                   http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/delmarvast argazers/ join
                   (Yahoo! ID required)

                <*> To change settings via email:
                   mailto:delmarvastargazers- digest@yahoogrou ps.com
                   mailto: delmarvastargazers- fullfeatured@ yahoogroups. com

                <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                   delmarvastargazers- unsubscribe@ yahoogroups. com

                <*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
                   http://docs. yahoo.com/ info/terms/





                --
                "A good conscience is a continual feast"
                Robert Burton

                  
                This communication is for use by the intended recipient and contains
                information that may be Privileged, confidential or copyrighted under
                applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby
                formally notified that any use, copying or distribution of this e-mail,
                in whole or in part, is strictly prohibited. Please notify the sender by
                return e-mail and delete this e-mail from your system. Unless explicitly
                and conspicuously designated as "E-Contract Intended", this e-mail does
                not constitute a contract offer, a contract amendment, or an acceptance
                of a contract offer. This e-mail does not constitute a consent to the
                use of sender's contact information for direct marketing purposes or for
                transfers of data to third parties.
                  
                Francais Deutsch Italiano  Espanol  Portugues  Japanese  Chinese  Korean
                  
                           http://www.DuPont. com/corp/ email_disclaimer .html
              • Jean-Paul Richard
                Doug: A dob with digital circles is an inexpensive way to obtain a large aperture telescope. the Orion adds the possibility of buying the object locator later
                Message 7 of 17 , Nov 6, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  Doug:
                  A dob with digital circles is an inexpensive way to obtain
                  a large aperture telescope. the Orion adds the possibility of
                  buying the object locator later to help in finding objects in the sky.
                  I for one am almost exclusively interested in deep sky objects
                  (DSO's). For these, a large aperture and a dark site are of
                  great benefit. If you are not looking for a large aperture telescope,
                  the problem is very different.A 80mm good quality refractor
                  (little color aberration) could give you many nights of observing
                  pleasure. The moon, the planets, comets would be interesting
                  to observe. The color of stars might be more difficult to observe
                  if there is residual color aberration. Such aberration would
                  also make it more difficult to split close double stars. Reflectors
                  have no color aberration produced by the main and secondary
                  mirrors.
                  Jean-Paul.


                  Douglas Hemmick wrote:

                  > Steven:
                  >
                  > the business of using a dob with digital circles was due to Jean-Paul,
                  > so maybe he can get in on the debate, perhaps...?
                  >
                  > at this point, I have my eyes on a meade etx 80 mm refractor with
                  > autostar.
                  >
                  > I don't see that this is such a bad little scope,
                  > even if its a mere 80mm aperature.
                  >
                  > remember that Charlie Brown's christmas tree was eventually seen as
                  > the greatest thing there was... : )
                  >
                  > the scope:
                  >
                  > http://www.shutan.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=1&Product_Code=250-5391&Category_Code=telcat5
                  > <http://www.shutan.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=1&Product_Code=250-5391&Category_Code=telcat5>
                  >
                  > Doug
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.