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Re: [delmarvastargazers] goto scopes, and planetariums

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  • rodney owens
    DOUG, Oh my , I didn t realize you were shopping on EBAY. Of all places to avoid astro equipment that is the one. Try AstroMart. The stuff on Ebay is generally
    Message 1 of 13 , Oct 31, 2006
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      DOUG,
      Oh my , I didn't realize you were shopping on EBAY. Of all places to avoid astro equipment that is the one. Try AstroMart. The stuff on Ebay is generally very very low quality. No matter how much they make it look like a great deal, it is not. I am sure a number of other members will chime in on this observation.
      Rodney
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Tuesday, October 31, 2006 10:47 PM
      Subject: [delmarvastargazers] goto scopes, and planetariums

      muchos gracious to rodney and steve!

      your advice is appreciated.

      to make things clear, I now own just
      one scope: the 3.5" maksukov casssegrain.
      (sold the 6" newtonian reflector years ago...)

      I guess I will not be able to resist the low
      prices offered at an eBay astronomy store I
      found: $130 for a 5" goto reflector...

      for the planetarium info I thank you also!

      seems like I asked the right people, very clearly.

      Doug

      --
      "A good conscience is a continual feast"
      Robert Burton

    • Douglas Hemmick
      well, I was not looking at plain-vanilla eBay listings, but an eBay Store , which offered hundreds of Meade products, actually.
      Message 2 of 13 , Nov 1, 2006
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        well, I was not looking at plain-vanilla eBay listings, but an "eBay Store",
        which offered hundreds of Meade products, actually.

        http://stores.ebay.com/Telescope-Warehouse_W0QQcolZ4QQdirZ1QQfsubZ0QQftidZ2QQpZ8QQtZkm

        I also called "Shutan Camera" in Chicago Illinois, and the gentleman there
        informed me of several good gotos, but the least expensive was already
        $400.. : (

        His store listed online less expensive goto's but he said that since I had
        used a 3.5" Mak, these would be disappointing to me...

        On 10/31/06, rodney owens <rodbo1967@...> wrote:
        DOUG,
        Oh my , I didn't realize you were shopping on EBAY. Of all places to avoid astro equipment that is the one. Try AstroMart. The stuff on Ebay is generally very very low quality. No matter how much they make it look like a great deal, it is not. I am sure a number of other members will chime in on this observation.
        Rodney
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Tuesday, October 31, 2006 10:47 PM
        Subject: [delmarvastargazers] goto scopes, and planetariums

        muchos gracious to rodney and steve!

        your advice is appreciated.

        to make things clear, I now own just
        one scope: the 3.5" maksukov casssegrain.
        (sold the 6" newtonian reflector years ago...)

        I guess I will not be able to resist the low
        prices offered at an eBay astronomy store I
        found: $130 for a 5" goto reflector...

        for the planetarium info I thank you also!

        seems like I asked the right people, very clearly.

        Doug

        --
        "A good conscience is a continual feast"
        Robert Burton




        --
        "A good conscience is a continual feast"
        Robert Burton
      • rodney owens
        I actually bought a Celestron 8inch SCT from him last year, it was not listed on his site. He picked up my ad on Cloudy Nights. Depending on what you want to
        Message 3 of 13 , Nov 1, 2006
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          I actually bought a Celestron 8inch SCT from him last year, it was not listed on his site. He picked up my ad on Cloudy Nights. Depending on what you want to do and go in the future with amateur astronomy most of those scopes are callbacks from places like WalMart and Ritz Camera. The guy is super nice and easy to deal with. Again, a deal that is super good is not always as it appears. The next time you are at WalMart look at the Meade scopes they have up by the registers, proclaiming some ridiculous magnifications (500X or better). These are the scopes Telescope Warehouse has. I agree with the earlier post, head to a star party and check out what is out there. If you have the time, shop around as much as possible.
           
          Good luck, Rodney
           
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Wednesday, November 01, 2006 7:05 AM
          Subject: Re: [delmarvastargazers] goto scopes, and planetariums

          well, I was not looking at plain-vanilla eBay listings, but an "eBay Store",
          which offered hundreds of Meade products, actually.

          http://stores. ebay.com/ Telescope- Warehouse_ W0QQcolZ4QQdirZ1 QQfsubZ0QQftidZ2 QQpZ8QQtZkm

          I also called "Shutan Camera" in Chicago Illinois, and the gentleman there
          informed me of several good gotos, but the least expensive was already
          $400.. : (

          His store listed online less expensive goto's but he said that since I had
          used a 3.5" Mak, these would be disappointing to me...

          On 10/31/06, rodney owens <rodbo1967@msn. com> wrote:
          DOUG,
          Oh my , I didn't realize you were shopping on EBAY. Of all places to avoid astro equipment that is the one. Try AstroMart. The stuff on Ebay is generally very very low quality. No matter how much they make it look like a great deal, it is not. I am sure a number of other members will chime in on this observation.
          Rodney
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Tuesday, October 31, 2006 10:47 PM
          Subject: [delmarvastargazers ] goto scopes, and planetariums

          muchos gracious to rodney and steve!

          your advice is appreciated.

          to make things clear, I now own just
          one scope: the 3.5" maksukov casssegrain.
          (sold the 6" newtonian reflector years ago...)

          I guess I will not be able to resist the low
          prices offered at an eBay astronomy store I
          found: $130 for a 5" goto reflector...

          for the planetarium info I thank you also!

          seems like I asked the right people, very clearly.

          Doug

          --
          "A good conscience is a continual feast"
          Robert Burton




          --
          "A good conscience is a continual feast"
          Robert Burton

        • Don R Surles
          here s my 2 cents worth of advice: 1) buy as much aperture as you can afford; avoid F ratios under 5 because the probability of getting a well-figured mirror
          Message 4 of 13 , Nov 1, 2006
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            here's my 2 cents worth of advice:

            1) buy as much aperture as you can afford; avoid F ratios under 5 because the probability of getting a well-figured mirror decreases significantly as the F-ratio gets shorter...I prefer F-6 or F-7 because I can use longer focal length eyepieces that provide longer eye relief.

            2) forget the stepper-motor-driven versions of GOTO...each movement of the scope must be done via the motors/handcontroller or you lose your alignment...you will forever more be atrtached to the handcontroller.  I have owned and attempted to use several versions of these; some of them could not find the Milky Way.   And another drawback of stepper motor GOTO scopes...motors cause vibrations in the entire scope assembly that will impair the use of the scope at high powers...I have seen some expensive stepper motor driven scopes that just would not split a given double star until the motors were turned off ...and the alignment lost.  There are versions that couple synchronous motors with optical encoders that allow movement of the scope by hand and/or hand controller but these are very expensive...I would rather put my $$$ into some super eyepieces and other accessories.

            3) if you need computer pointing assistance go for the Orion version (optical encoders and computer for $249.00); movement is by your hand attached to the tube - no alignment lost - no trying to draw circles with an Etch-A-Sketch

            4) avoid truss type scopes if possible, especially for scopes under 16"...that short assembly/disassembly period (more like 30 minutes to assemble and collimate) and a similar amount of time to disassemble, is time you could spend doing something much more enjoyable...as a matter fo fact after assembling/disassembling the scope a few times you will probably grow to dislike the experience.  The dislike will increase exponentially with each setup and takedown.

            5)  get yourself a good star atlas, finder scope, telrad, and a nice widefield eyepiece...then learn to starhop.  no batteries, no cables, no alignments...FREEDOM to roam the skies and enjoy the nighttime.

            6) go to where people are star gazing and use their scopes, ask questions, and ask what they would buy if they could start over or find someone to purchase what they are currently using.  You may even find a scope you like at  a reasonable price.

            7) Simple is better than complex

            8) there is no Perfect Scope for all types of star gazing, ie, you probably will accumulate at least a dozen...small grab and go's, long focal length refractors for planets, light buckets for deep sky, schmidt-cass to fit the back seat of your sport sedan, and others because you like their appearance (Questars, Televues, etc).

            Good luck...

            Don...




            "Douglas Hemmick" <jsbell.ontarget@...>
            Sent by: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com

            10/31/2006 11:01 PM

            Please respond to
            delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com

            To
            delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com
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            [delmarvastargazers] goto scopes, and planetariums





            muchos gracious to rodney and steve!

            your advice is appreciated.

            to make things clear, I now own just
            one scope: the 3.5" maksukov casssegrain.
            (sold the 6" newtonian reflector years ago...)

            I guess I will not be able to resist the low
            prices offered at an eBay astronomy store I
            found: $130 for a 5" goto reflector...

            for the planetarium info I thank you also!

            seems like I asked the right people, very clearly.

            Doug

            --
            "A good conscience is a continual feast"
            Robert Burton

            This communication is for use by the intended recipient and contains
            information that may be Privileged, confidential or copyrighted under
            applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby
            formally notified that any use, copying or distribution of this e-mail,
            in whole or in part, is strictly prohibited. Please notify the sender by
            return e-mail and delete this e-mail from your system. Unless explicitly
            and conspicuously designated as "E-Contract Intended", this e-mail does
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          • Jerry Truitt
            Doug If $400 is scaring you off, you re not really looking for a good Goto. I would suggest before you buy anything stop down to Tuckahoe when some other
            Message 5 of 13 , Nov 1, 2006
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              Doug

              If $400 is scaring you off, you're not really looking for a good
              Goto.

              I would suggest before you buy anything stop down to Tuckahoe when
              some other members are present with the scope you have now and let
              them help you find some things.

              I'm saying this from personal experience. If you're think getting a
              Goto or a bigger scope is your answer to finding things you'll be
              very disappointed, trust me on this, you'll end up very frustrated.

              If you read this site you'll often hear some of our most experienced
              Observers telling what they found with 4.5" scopes. I'm not saying
              big isn't better, it is, it just isn't everything.

              Once you learn your way around the sky you'll really have a better
              idea of what kind of scope you want and need and will be able to
              make a good purchase.

              Going to Tuckahoe with others will give you a chance to view through
              other types of scopes and members are always willing to help each
              other out. I'm sure if it wasn't for people like Leonard White,
              Keith Lohmeyer and Don Surles teaching me how to find things I would
              still be lost in space.

              Also Mt. Cuba has a planetarium, and we will be holding our December
              meeting at the facility.

              If you can't get to Tuckahoe, try coming out to some out reach
              events. I'll be at Port Deposit Maryland on the 13th.

              Good Luck Jerry

              --- In delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com, "Douglas Hemmick"
              <jsbell.ontarget@...> wrote:
              >
              > well, I was not looking at plain-vanilla eBay listings, but
              an "eBay Store",
              > which offered hundreds of Meade products, actually.
              >
              > http://stores.ebay.com/Telescope-
              Warehouse_W0QQcolZ4QQdirZ1QQfsubZ0QQftidZ2QQpZ8QQtZkm
              >
              > I also called "Shutan Camera" in Chicago Illinois, and the
              gentleman there
              > informed me of several good gotos, but the least expensive was
              already
              > $400.. : (
              >
              > His store listed online less expensive goto's but he said that
              since I had
              > used a 3.5" Mak, these would be disappointing to me...
              >
              > On 10/31/06, rodney owens <rodbo1967@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > DOUG,
              > > Oh my , I didn't realize you were shopping on EBAY. Of all
              places to avoid
              > > astro equipment that is the one. Try AstroMart. The stuff on
              Ebay is
              > > generally very very low quality. No matter how much they make it
              look like a
              > > great deal, it is not. I am sure a number of other members will
              chime in on
              > > this observation.
              > > Rodney
              > >
              > > ----- Original Message -----
              > > *From:* Douglas Hemmick <jsbell.ontarget@...>
              > > *To:* delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com
              > > *Sent:* Tuesday, October 31, 2006 10:47 PM
              > > *Subject:* [delmarvastargazers] goto scopes, and planetariums
              > >
              > > muchos gracious to rodney and steve!
              > >
              > > your advice is appreciated.
              > >
              > > to make things clear, I now own just
              > > one scope: the 3.5" maksukov casssegrain.
              > > (sold the 6" newtonian reflector years ago...)
              > >
              > > I guess I will not be able to resist the low
              > > prices offered at an eBay astronomy store I
              > > found: $130 for a 5" goto reflector...
              > >
              > > for the planetarium info I thank you also!
              > >
              > > seems like I asked the right people, very clearly.
              > >
              > > Doug
              > >
              > > --
              > > "A good conscience is a continual feast"
              > > Robert Burton
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              > --
              > "A good conscience is a continual feast"
              > Robert Burton
              >
            • David M Groski
              I ve been in this hobby for around 30 years now and have a basement full of telescopes of just about every type. I agree with Don totally. Get the biggest Dob
              Message 6 of 13 , Nov 1, 2006
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                 I've been in this hobby for around 30 years now and  have a basement full of telescopes of just about every type. I agree with Don totally. Get the biggest Dob that you can EASILY move in at out of the house/car etc. My favorite 'scope is 8" f/7 dob, with a solid tube. It's out of the basement and  in the back yard in under 3 minutes. The 8" mirror does a nice job Deepsky objects and the f-ratio of 7 gives me a long enough focal length that I can get some high mag. without going to "pin hole" eyepieces to observe the planets. I'll add to Don's statements, that you want a Dob with tube length of around 4 to 5 feet. At that size you can handle it and you'll be standing in a comfortable position while your doing most of your observing. It's no fun being all hunched over trying to look thru the eyepiece or getting wet knees/backside from sitting the in grass.

                                      - Dave


                Don R Surles/AE/DuPont@DuPont
                Sent by: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com

                11/01/2006 08:19 AM

                Please respond to
                delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com

                To
                delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com
                cc
                Subject
                Re: [delmarvastargazers] goto scopes, and planetariums






                here's my 2 cents worth of advice:


                1) buy as much aperture as you can afford; avoid F ratios under 5 because the probability of getting a well-figured mirror decreases significantly as the F-ratio gets shorter...I prefer F-6 or F-7 because I can use longer focal length eyepieces that provide longer eye relief.


                2) forget the stepper-motor-driven versions of GOTO...each movement of the scope must be done via the motors/handcontroller or you lose your alignment...you will forever more be atrtached to the handcontroller.  I have owned and attempted to use several versions of these; some of them could not find the Milky Way.   And another drawback of stepper motor GOTO scopes...motors cause vibrations in the entire scope assembly that will impair the use of the scope at high powers...I have seen some expensive stepper motor driven scopes that just would not split a given double star until the motors were turned off ...and the alignment lost.  There are versions that couple synchronous motors with optical encoders that allow movement of the scope by hand and/or hand controller but these are very expensive...I would rather put my $$$ into some super eyepieces and other accessories.


                3) if you need computer pointing assistance go for the Orion version (optical encoders and computer for $249.00); movement is by your hand attached to the tube - no alignment lost - no trying to draw circles with an Etch-A-Sketch


                4) avoid truss type scopes if possible, especially for scopes under 16"...that short assembly/disassembly period (more like 30 minutes to assemble and collimate) and a similar amount of time to disassemble, is time you could spend doing something much more enjoyable...as a matter fo fact after assembling/disassembling the scope a few times you will probably grow to dislike the experience.  The dislike will increase exponentially with each setup and takedown.


                5)  get yourself a good star atlas, finder scope, telrad, and a nice widefield eyepiece...then learn to starhop.  no batteries, no cables, no alignments...FREEDOM to roam the skies and enjoy the nighttime.


                6) go to where people are star gazing and use their scopes, ask questions, and ask what they would buy if they could start over or find someone to purchase what they are currently using.  You may even find a scope you like at  a reasonable price.


                7) Simple is better than complex


                8) there is no Perfect Scope for all types of star gazing, ie, you probably will accumulate at least a dozen...small grab and go's, long focal length refractors for planets, light buckets for deep sky, schmidt-cass to fit the back seat of your sport sedan, and others because you like their appearance (Questars, Televues, etc).


                Good luck...


                Don...




                "Douglas Hemmick" <jsbell.ontarget@...>
                Sent by: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com

                10/31/2006 11:01 PM

                Please respond to
                delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com

                To
                delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com
                cc
                Subject
                [delmarvastargazers] goto scopes, and planetariums







                muchos gracious to rodney and steve!

                your advice is appreciated.

                to make things clear, I now own just
                one scope: the 3.5" maksukov casssegrain.
                (sold the 6" newtonian reflector years ago...)

                I guess I will not be able to resist the low
                prices offered at an eBay astronomy store I
                found: $130 for a 5" goto reflector...

                for the planetarium info I thank you also!

                seems like I asked the right people, very clearly.

                Doug

                --
                "A good conscience is a continual feast"
                Robert Burton


                This communication is for use by the intended recipient and contains
                information that may be Privileged, confidential or copyrighted under
                applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby
                formally notified that any use, copying or distribution of this e-mail,
                in whole or in part, is strictly prohibited. Please notify the sender by
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                and conspicuously designated as "E-Contract Intended", this e-mail does
                not constitute a contract offer, a contract amendment, or an acceptance
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                This communication is for use by the intended recipient and contains
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              • Don R Surles
                As usual for the past several years(at least 10 and maybe 12) I put a scope at the end of my driveway last night to offer a view of the 3/4 full moon to our
                Message 7 of 13 , Nov 1, 2006
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                  As usual for the past several years(at least 10 and maybe 12) I put a scope at the end of my driveway last night to offer a view of the 3/4 full moon to our trick or treaters.  Mother Nature co-operated by clearing the sky and offering a nice moon for low power viewing.

                  I get a special treat from watching a little angel or devil costumed T-ot-T'er climb the ladder to peer thru the eyepiece...a bucket of candy in one hand, the other hand grabbing for the eyepiece, surprised when the old 17.5" Coulter moves off target.  But, with a little explaining about not grabbing the eyepiece they get the drift and let us know they have seen the intended target with the familiar "Wow!".

                  Last night, I had a few young parents with their T-or-T'er remind me that TIME marches on.  It seems the young parents remember coming by our house when they were kids and got their first peek thru the scope.  So, does that make the 17.5"er a grandparent?

                  In addition to looking at the moon last night, the sky cleared twixt us and Hercules so I decided to gaze uponst Comet SWAN.  I can report to you the backside of the Comet is definitely on the bluish-green side as viewed with my eye and the eyes of two off-the-street non-descript parents who confirmed the bluish-green hue.

                  So, I would say we had an enjoyable Trick-or-Treat session.

                  Next year we may set up the 25"er in a more public place.

                  Don...

                  This communication is for use by the intended recipient and contains
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                • twforte@cox.net
                  Mother Nature was too much of a tease here in Virginia Beach. I look forward, each Halloween, to setting up a telescope at the end of my drive too. But last
                  Message 8 of 13 , Nov 1, 2006
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                    Mother Nature was too much of a tease here in Virginia Beach. I look forward, each Halloween, to setting up a telescope at the end of my drive too. But last night the clouds wouldn't allow more than a hint of a moon and little else. Too bad, so many of my neighbors look forward to it; I think they enjoy it almost as much as I do.

                    By the way, anyone know how to remove grease paint make-up and chocolate stains from Naglers?

                    Ted Forte



                    ---- Don R Surles <Don.R.Surles-1@...> wrote:
                    > As usual for the past several years(at least 10 and maybe 12) I put a
                    > scope at the end of my driveway last night to offer a view of the 3/4 full
                    > moon to our trick or treaters. Mother Nature co-operated by clearing the
                    > sky and offering a nice moon for low power viewing.
                    >
                    > I get a special treat from watching a little angel or devil costumed
                    > T-ot-T'er climb the ladder to peer thru the eyepiece...a bucket of candy
                    > in one hand, the other hand grabbing for the eyepiece, surprised when the
                    > old 17.5" Coulter moves off target. But, with a little explaining about
                    > not grabbing the eyepiece they get the drift and let us know they have
                    > seen the intended target with the familiar "Wow!".
                    >
                    > Last night, I had a few young parents with their T-or-T'er remind me that
                    > TIME marches on. It seems the young parents remember coming by our house
                    > when they were kids and got their first peek thru the scope. So, does
                    > that make the 17.5"er a grandparent?
                    >
                    > In addition to looking at the moon last night, the sky cleared twixt us
                    > and Hercules so I decided to gaze uponst Comet SWAN. I can report to you
                    > the backside of the Comet is definitely on the bluish-green side as viewed
                    > with my eye and the eyes of two off-the-street non-descript parents who
                    > confirmed the bluish-green hue.
                    >
                    > So, I would say we had an enjoyable Trick-or-Treat session.
                    >
                    > Next year we may set up the 25"er in a more public place.
                    >
                    > Don...
                    >
                    >
                    > This communication is for use by the intended recipient and contains
                    > information that may be Privileged, confidential or copyrighted under
                    > applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby
                    > formally notified that any use, copying or distribution of this e-mail,
                    > in whole or in part, is strictly prohibited. Please notify the sender by
                    > return e-mail and delete this e-mail from your system. Unless explicitly
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                    > of a contract offer. This e-mail does not constitute a consent to the
                    > use of sender's contact information for direct marketing purposes or for
                    > transfers of data to third parties.
                    >
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                  • Don R Surles
                    Since there seems to be some differing opinions on the best type of scopes let me be a bit more specific in my 2 cents worth of advice: 1) all aspiring
                    Message 9 of 13 , Nov 1, 2006
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                      Since there seems to be some differing opinions on the best type of scopes let me be a bit more specific in my 2 cents worth of advice:

                      1) all aspiring astronomers should seriously consider a 1 ton cube-truck to store and transport their gear...short of that a cargo trailer will suffice but you then need a heavy duty towing vehicle...mirrors and naglers are heavy.  Often I have contemplated a used diesel powered school bus.

                      2) imho, any scope less than 16-18" in aperture should be a solid tube arrangement...most of them will fit comfortably into the cube truck or the cargo trailer or a long bed F-150 (the abolute minimum astronomy vehicle).  Hand trucks and appliance dollies make transportation around the garage, into and out of the truck or trailer very manageable.

                      3) solid tube scopes (especially cardboard types) remove the truss-type hassle of assembly, collimation, dew fighting, recollimation during the night after cool down of dis-similar scope construction materials, and finally the disassembly with tired, cold hands.  solid tube telescopes are just SOLID, dependable well performing instruments

                      4) don't ever, ie, never, ever, look thru a scope larger than the one you own or have actually purchased (you are just waiting for the motor freight carrirer to deliver it - notice that scopes delivered by UPS or FEDEX do not qualify - too small).  

                      5) if you do succum to the enticements of the larger scope, your smaller scope will never, ever perform as well as it did prior to your being seduced by the larger scope.  yes, it is kind of like marriage and being caught looking or %$#@$#%

                      So, bottom line, we all have our priorities and they are very different from person to person.  Just prepare yourself for a longterm relationship with your scope...if you like it.  if you don't then Astromart is a good way to sever the relationship and there will be no alimony payments.

                      Don...

                       


                      Don R Surles/AE/DuPont@DuPont
                      Sent by: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com

                      11/01/2006 08:20 AM

                      Please respond to
                      delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com

                      To
                      delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com
                      cc
                      Subject
                      Re: [delmarvastargazers] goto scopes, and planetariums






                      here's my 2 cents worth of advice:


                      1) buy as much aperture as you can afford; avoid F ratios under 5 because the probability of getting a well-figured mirror decreases significantly as the F-ratio gets shorter...I prefer F-6 or F-7 because I can use longer focal length eyepieces that provide longer eye relief.


                      2) forget the stepper-motor-driven versions of GOTO...each movement of the scope must be done via the motors/handcontroller or you lose your alignment...you will forever more be atrtached to the handcontroller.  I have owned and attempted to use several versions of these; some of them could not find the Milky Way.   And another drawback of stepper motor GOTO scopes...motors cause vibrations in the entire scope assembly that will impair the use of the scope at high powers...I have seen some expensive stepper motor driven scopes that just would not split a given double star until the motors were turned off ...and the alignment lost.  There are versions that couple synchronous motors with optical encoders that allow movement of the scope by hand and/or hand controller but these are very expensive...I would rather put my $$$ into some super eyepieces and other accessories.


                      3) if you need computer pointing assistance go for the Orion version (optical encoders and computer for $249.00); movement is by your hand attached to the tube - no alignment lost - no trying to draw circles with an Etch-A-Sketch


                      4) avoid truss type scopes if possible, especially for scopes under 16"...that short assembly/disassembly period (more like 30 minutes to assemble and collimate) and a similar amount of time to disassemble, is time you could spend doing something much more enjoyable...as a matter fo fact after assembling/disassembling the scope a few times you will probably grow to dislike the experience.  The dislike will increase exponentially with each setup and takedown.


                      5)  get yourself a good star atlas, finder scope, telrad, and a nice widefield eyepiece...then learn to starhop.  no batteries, no cables, no alignments...FREEDOM to roam the skies and enjoy the nighttime.


                      6) go to where people are star gazing and use their scopes, ask questions, and ask what they would buy if they could start over or find someone to purchase what they are currently using.  You may even find a scope you like at  a reasonable price.


                      7) Simple is better than complex


                      8) there is no Perfect Scope for all types of star gazing, ie, you probably will accumulate at least a dozen...small grab and go's, long focal length refractors for planets, light buckets for deep sky, schmidt-cass to fit the back seat of your sport sedan, and others because you like their appearance (Questars, Televues, etc).


                      Good luck...


                      Don...




                      "Douglas Hemmick" <jsbell.ontarget@...>
                      Sent by: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com

                      10/31/2006 11:01 PM

                      Please respond to
                      delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com

                      To
                      delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com
                      cc
                      Subject
                      [delmarvastargazers] goto scopes, and planetariums







                      muchos gracious to rodney and steve!

                      your advice is appreciated.

                      to make things clear, I now own just
                      one scope: the 3.5" maksukov casssegrain.
                      (sold the 6" newtonian reflector years ago...)

                      I guess I will not be able to resist the low
                      prices offered at an eBay astronomy store I
                      found: $130 for a 5" goto reflector...

                      for the planetarium info I thank you also!

                      seems like I asked the right people, very clearly.

                      Doug

                      --
                      "A good conscience is a continual feast"
                      Robert Burton


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                    • kentblackwell
                      Ted Forte writes, By the way, anyone know how to remove grease paint make-up and chocolate stains from Naglers? Kent writes, Yea, don t let kids anywhere
                      Message 10 of 13 , Nov 1, 2006
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Ted Forte writes,
                        "By the way, anyone know how to remove grease paint make-up and
                        chocolate stains from Naglers?"

                        Kent writes,
                        "Yea, don't let kids anywhere near your telescope!"



                        --- In delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com, <twforte@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Mother Nature was too much of a tease here in Virginia Beach. I
                        look forward, each Halloween, to setting up a telescope at the end of
                        my drive too. But last night the clouds wouldn't allow more than a
                        hint of a moon and little else. Too bad, so many of my neighbors
                        look forward to it; I think they enjoy it almost as much as I do.
                        >
                        > By the way, anyone know how to remove grease paint make-up and
                        chocolate stains from Naglers?
                        >
                        > Ted Forte
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > ---- Don R Surles <Don.R.Surles-1@...> wrote:
                        > > As usual for the past several years(at least 10 and maybe 12) I
                        put a
                        > > scope at the end of my driveway last night to offer a view of the
                        3/4 full
                        > > moon to our trick or treaters. Mother Nature co-operated by
                        clearing the
                        > > sky and offering a nice moon for low power viewing.
                        > >
                        > > I get a special treat from watching a little angel or devil
                        costumed
                        > > T-ot-T'er climb the ladder to peer thru the eyepiece...a bucket
                        of candy
                        > > in one hand, the other hand grabbing for the eyepiece, surprised
                        when the
                        > > old 17.5" Coulter moves off target. But, with a little
                        explaining about
                        > > not grabbing the eyepiece they get the drift and let us know they
                        have
                        > > seen the intended target with the familiar "Wow!".
                        > >
                        > > Last night, I had a few young parents with their T-or-T'er remind
                        me that
                        > > TIME marches on. It seems the young parents remember coming by
                        our house
                        > > when they were kids and got their first peek thru the scope. So,
                        does
                        > > that make the 17.5"er a grandparent?
                        > >
                        > > In addition to looking at the moon last night, the sky cleared
                        twixt us
                        > > and Hercules so I decided to gaze uponst Comet SWAN. I can
                        report to you
                        > > the backside of the Comet is definitely on the bluish-green side
                        as viewed
                        > > with my eye and the eyes of two off-the-street non-descript
                        parents who
                        > > confirmed the bluish-green hue.
                        > >
                        > > So, I would say we had an enjoyable Trick-or-Treat session.
                        > >
                        > > Next year we may set up the 25"er in a more public place.
                        > >
                        > > Don...
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > This communication is for use by the intended recipient and
                        contains
                        > > information that may be Privileged, confidential or copyrighted
                        under
                        > > applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are
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                        mail,
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                        > > of a contract offer. This e-mail does not constitute a consent to
                        the
                        > > use of sender's contact information for direct marketing purposes
                        or for
                        > > transfers of data to third parties.
                        > >
                        > > Francais Deutsch Italiano Espanol Portugues Japanese Chinese
                        Korean
                        > >
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                        >
                      • Joe Morris
                        I m interested in either the Celestron or Apogee binocs so put me on a list. I thought that the 45 degree angled eyepieces would be the best for old, sore
                        Message 11 of 13 , Nov 1, 2006
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                          Message
                          I'm interested in either the Celestron or Apogee binocs so put me on a list.  I thought that the 45 degree angled eyepieces would be the best for old, sore necks using these big binocs.  Is that not true if one is using a tripod or parallelogram mount?
                           
                          Speaking of Astromart, I've not gotten any emails from them for 4 days or so.  I don't see from their website that they're having any problems.  Anyone else having problems?  Any tips on signing back on if they've lost me?
                           
                          Joe

                          --
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                        • Douglas Hemmick
                          Hello Don, David and Jerry Thanks for your well thought out and generous advice. I need to digest all the advice given and compare it to my own inclinations,
                          Message 12 of 13 , Nov 4, 2006
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Hello Don, David and Jerry

                            Thanks for your well thought out and generous advice.

                            I need to digest all the advice given and compare it to my own inclinations, ideas, and so on.

                            Tuckahoe is tough for me to get to, but we'll see.

                            Maybe I should just forget the struggle to calculate the ideal scope and buy a set of photos from the Keck and just gaze at these...????    : )

                            I had another question to ask, but I forgot it.

                            Perhaps that's why I was thinking of a computer brain for my scope's drive, since my own brain tends to forget at the slightest opportunity... : )

                            Doug

                            On 11/1/06, Don R Surles <Don.R.Surles-1@...> wrote:

                            Since there seems to be some differing opinions on the best type of scopes let me be a bit more specific in my 2 cents worth of advice:

                            1) all aspiring astronomers should seriously consider a 1 ton cube-truck to store and transport their gear...short of that a cargo trailer will suffice but you then need a heavy duty towing vehicle...mirrors and naglers are heavy.  Often I have contemplated a used diesel powered school bus.

                            2) imho, any scope less than 16-18" in aperture should be a solid tube arrangement...most of them will fit comfortably into the cube truck or the cargo trailer or a long bed F-150 (the abolute minimum astronomy vehicle).  Hand trucks and appliance dollies make transportation around the garage, into and out of the truck or trailer very manageable.

                            3) solid tube scopes (especially cardboard types) remove the truss-type hassle of assembly, collimation, dew fighting, recollimation during the night after cool down of dis-similar scope construction materials, and finally the disassembly with tired, cold hands.  solid tube telescopes are just SOLID, dependable well performing instruments

                            4) don't ever, ie, never, ever, look thru a scope larger than the one you own or have actually purchased (you are just waiting for the motor freight carrirer to deliver it - notice that scopes delivered by UPS or FEDEX do not qualify - too small).  

                            5) if you do succum to the enticements of the larger scope, your smaller scope will never, ever perform as well as it did prior to your being seduced by the larger scope.  yes, it is kind of like marriage and being caught looking or %$#@$#%

                            So, bottom line, we all have our priorities and they are very different from person to person.  Just prepare yourself for a longterm relationship with your scope...if you like it.  if you don't then Astromart is a good way to sever the relationship and there will be no alimony payments.

                            Don...

                             


                            Don R Surles/AE/DuPont@DuPont
                            Sent by: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com

                            11/01/2006 08:20 AM


                            To
                            delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com
                            cc

                            Subject
                            Re: [delmarvastargazers] goto scopes, and planetariums








                            here's my 2 cents worth of advice:


                            1) buy as much aperture as you can afford; avoid F ratios under 5 because the probability of getting a well-figured mirror decreases significantly as the F-ratio gets shorter...I prefer F-6 or F-7 because I can use longer focal length eyepieces that provide longer eye relief.


                            2) forget the stepper-motor-driven versions of GOTO...each movement of the scope must be done via the motors/handcontroller or you lose your alignment...you will forever more be atrtached to the handcontroller.  I have owned and attempted to use several versions of these; some of them could not find the Milky Way.   And another drawback of stepper motor GOTO scopes...motors cause vibrations in the entire scope assembly that will impair the use of the scope at high powers...I have seen some expensive stepper motor driven scopes that just would not split a given double star until the motors were turned off ...and the alignment lost.  There are versions that couple synchronous motors with optical encoders that allow movement of the scope by hand and/or hand controller but these are very expensive...I would rather put my $$$ into some super eyepieces and other accessories.


                            3) if you need computer pointing assistance go for the Orion version (optical encoders and computer for $249.00); movement is by your hand attached to the tube - no alignment lost - no trying to draw circles with an Etch-A-Sketch


                            4) avoid truss type scopes if possible, especially for scopes under 16"...that short assembly/disassembly period (more like 30 minutes to assemble and collimate) and a similar amount of time to disassemble, is time you could spend doing something much more enjoyable...as a matter fo fact after assembling/disassembling the scope a few times you will probably grow to dislike the experience.  The dislike will increase exponentially with each setup and takedown.


                            5)  get yourself a good star atlas, finder scope, telrad, and a nice widefield eyepiece...then learn to starhop.  no batteries, no cables, no alignments...FREEDOM to roam the skies and enjoy the nighttime.


                            6) go to where people are star gazing and use their scopes, ask questions, and ask what they would buy if they could start over or find someone to purchase what they are currently using.  You may even find a scope you like at  a reasonable price.


                            7) Simple is better than complex


                            8) there is no Perfect Scope for all types of star gazing, ie, you probably will accumulate at least a dozen...small grab and go's, long focal length refractors for planets, light buckets for deep sky, schmidt-cass to fit the back seat of your sport sedan, and others because you like their appearance (Questars, Televues, etc).


                            Good luck...


                            Don...




                            "Douglas Hemmick" <jsbell.ontarget@...>
                            Sent by: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com

                            10/31/2006 11:01 PM

                            To
                            delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com
                            cc

                            Subject
                            [delmarvastargazers] goto scopes, and planetariums









                            muchos gracious to rodney and steve!

                            your advice is appreciated.

                            to make things clear, I now own just
                            one scope: the 3.5" maksukov casssegrain.
                            (sold the 6" newtonian reflector years ago...)

                            I guess I will not be able to resist the low
                            prices offered at an eBay astronomy store I
                            found: $130 for a 5" goto reflector...

                            for the planetarium info I thank you also!

                            seems like I asked the right people, very clearly.

                            Doug

                            --
                            "A good conscience is a continual feast"
                            Robert Burton


                            This communication is for use by the intended recipient and contains
                            information that may be Privileged, confidential or copyrighted under
                            applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby
                            formally notified that any use, copying or distribution of this e-mail,
                            in whole or in part, is strictly prohibited. Please notify the sender by
                            return e-mail and delete this e-mail from your system. Unless explicitly
                            and conspicuously designated as "E-Contract Intended", this e-mail does
                            not constitute a contract offer, a contract amendment, or an acceptance
                            of a contract offer. This e-mail does not constitute a consent to the
                            use of sender's contact information for direct marketing purposes or for
                            transfers of data to third parties.

                            Francais Deutsch Italiano  Espanol  Portugues  Japanese  Chinese  Korean

                                      http://www.DuPont.com/corp/email_disclaimer.html


                            This communication is for use by the intended recipient and contains
                            information that may be Privileged, confidential or copyrighted under
                            applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby
                            formally notified that any use, copying or distribution of this e-mail,
                            in whole or in part, is strictly prohibited. Please notify the sender by
                            return e-mail and delete this e-mail from your system. Unless explicitly
                            and conspicuously designated as "E-Contract Intended", this e-mail does
                            not constitute a contract offer, a contract amendment, or an acceptance
                            of a contract offer. This e-mail does not constitute a consent to the
                            use of sender's contact information for direct marketing purposes or for
                            transfers of data to third parties.

                            Francais Deutsch Italiano Espanol Portugues Japanese Chinese Korean

                            http://www.DuPont.com/corp/email_disclaimer.html



                            --
                            "A good conscience is a continual feast"
                            Robert Burton
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