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June Happenings...

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  • Norton Douglas (DTI)
    OK folks, just in case you weren t aware, Mercury is going to quickly pass Venus in the sky and will actually be in the same eyepiece field of view on the 26th
    Message 1 of 10 , Jun 19 4:38 PM
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      June Happenings...

      OK folks, just in case you weren't aware, Mercury is going to quickly pass Venus in the sky and will actually be in the same eyepiece field of view on the 26th and 27th of June. Beginning June 24th start watching Mercury get closer to Venus on successive nights. This should prove to be not only a good opportunity visually but photographically as well. So get out the scope as early as possible before the sun sets and start searching for Venus. At their closest they will be a mere 9 arc minutes away from each other. I can say from my own personal experience, seeing Mercury is very exciting and very rewarding. It is a tiny object and seeing the phase on it is very neat. So mark your calendars and get out starting the 24th of June and keep watching until the 30th. Clear skies!



      Douglas A. Norton
      Department of Technology & Information
      William Penn Data Center
      Phone: 302-739-9604
      Fax: 302-739-3925
      Email: Douglas.Norton@...

      Sent from my BlackBerry Wireless Handheld

    • Norton Douglas (DTI)
      Success! I am looking at Venus and Mercury right now. Mercury appears to be around half phase. A little more actually. It is way outside a low power eyepiece
      Message 2 of 10 , Jun 19 5:31 PM
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        Re: [delmarvastargazers] June Happenings...

        Success! I am looking at Venus and Mercury right now. Mercury appears to be around half phase. A little more actually. It is way outside a low power eyepiece field. Both objects are beautiful. Go out and look!


        Douglas A. Norton
        Department of Technology & Information
        William Penn Data Center
        Phone: 302-739-9604
        Fax: 302-739-3925
        Email: Douglas.Norton@...

        Sent from my BlackBerry Wireless Handheld


        -----Original Message-----
        From: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com <delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com>
        To: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com <delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sun Jun 19 19:38:32 2005
        Subject: [delmarvastargazers] June Happenings...

        OK folks, just in case you weren't aware, Mercury is going to quickly pass Venus in the sky and will actually be in the same eyepiece field of view on the 26th and 27th of June. Beginning June 24th start watching Mercury get closer to Venus on successive nights. This should prove to be not only a good opportunity visually but photographically as well. So get out the scope as early as possible before the sun sets and start searching for Venus. At their closest they will be a mere 9 arc minutes away from each other. I can say from my own personal experience, seeing Mercury is very exciting and very rewarding. It is a tiny object and seeing the phase on it is very neat. So mark your calendars and get out starting the 24th of June and keep watching until the 30th. Clear skies!



        Douglas A. Norton
        Department of Technology & Information
        William Penn Data Center
        Phone: 302-739-9604
        Fax: 302-739-3925
        Email: Douglas.Norton@...

        Sent from my BlackBerry Wireless Handheld



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      • Michael Enright
        Doug, I m new at this but I don t understand this. You said in this note to get out your telescope before the sum sets and the other memo where you say you are
        Message 3 of 10 , Jun 19 5:47 PM
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          Doug,
           
          I'm new at this but I don't understand this. You said in this note to get out your telescope before the sum sets and the other memo where you say you are looking at Mercury and Venus was sent at 8:30 before the sun had set.  My question is, if you can't see Polaris to find North or any other stars to align your telescope with how do you find Mercury and Venus before it gets dark?
           
          Mike Enright

          "Norton Douglas (DTI)" <douglas.norton@...> wrote:

          OK folks, just in case you weren't aware, Mercury is going to quickly pass Venus in the sky and will actually be in the same eyepiece field of view on the 26th and 27th of June. Beginning June 24th start watching Mercury get closer to Venus on successive nights. This should prove to be not only a good opportunity visually but photographically as well. So get out the scope as early as possible before the sun sets and start searching for Venus. At their closest they will be a mere 9 arc minutes away from each other. I can say from my own personal experience, seeing Mercury is very exciting and very rewarding. It is a tiny object and seeing the phase on it is very neat. So mark your calendars and get out starting the 24th of June and keep watching until the 30th. Clear skies!



          Douglas A. Norton
          Department of Technology & Information
          William Penn Data Center
          Phone: 302-739-9604
          Fax: 302-739-3925
          Email: Douglas.Norton@...

          Sent from my BlackBerry Wireless Handheld

          __________________________________________________
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          Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
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        • Bob Bunge
          Venus is often pretty bright and can sometimes be seen before the sun sets. Especially if you know where to look in the sky, using landmarks on the horizon.
          Message 4 of 10 , Jun 19 5:54 PM
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            Venus is often pretty bright and can sometimes be seen before the sun
            sets. Especially if you know where to look in the sky, using landmarks
            on the horizon. Once you see them after it's darker, it's not too hard
            to come back the next night and find them before sunset. This is way
            easier if you use simple binoculars.

            If your telescope has a equatorial mount and you are setting up at a
            standard place ... like a drive way, you can mark where the tripod legs
            need to go to get rough alignment using chalk or paint. For visual use,
            normally a telescope doesn't have to be all that well polar aligned to
            use looking through the eyepiece. However, if you are using a computer
            to find the object, all bets are off... I would suspect your alignment
            would have to be somewhat close.

            Bob Bunge

            Michael Enright wrote:

            > Doug,
            >
            > I'm new at this but I don't understand this. You said in this note to
            > get out your telescope before the sum sets and the other memo where
            > you say you are looking at Mercury and Venus was sent at 8:30 before
            > the sun had set. My question is, if you can't see Polaris to find
            > North or any other stars to align your telescope with how do you find
            > Mercury and Venus before it gets dark?
            >
            > Mike Enright
            >
            > */"Norton Douglas (DTI)" <douglas.norton@...>/* wrote:
            >
            > OK folks, just in case you weren't aware, Mercury is going to
            > quickly pass Venus in the sky and will actually be in the same
            > eyepiece field of view on the 26th and 27th of June. Beginning
            > June 24th start watching Mercury get closer to Venus on successive
            > nights. This should prove to be not only a good opportunity
            > visually but photographically as well. So get out the scope as
            > early as possible before the sun sets and start searching for
            > Venus. At their closest they will be a mere 9 arc minutes away
            > from each other. I can say from my own personal experience, seeing
            > Mercury is very exciting and very rewarding. It is a tiny object
            > and seeing the phase on it is very neat. So mark your calendars
            > and get out starting the 24th of June and keep watching until the
            > 30th. Clear skies!
            >
            >
            >
            > Douglas A. Norton
            > Department of Technology & Information
            > William Penn Data Center
            > Phone: 302-739-9604
            > Fax: 302-739-3925
            > Email: Douglas.Norton@...
            >
            > Sent from my BlackBerry Wireless Handheld
            >
            > __________________________________________________
            > Do You Yahoo!?
            > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
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            >
          • Norton Douglas (DTI)
            Bob is right. Last night I marked where Venus was by a house it sets behind so I knew about where it should have been tonight. Using the chart in the Canadian
            Message 5 of 10 , Jun 19 6:02 PM
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              Re: [delmarvastargazers] June Happenings...

              Bob is right. Last night I marked where Venus was by a house it sets behind so I knew about where it should have been tonight. Using the chart in the Canadian astronomy magazine I had to search in ever widening circles to find Mercury. Venus is easily seen way before the sun sets. So that's how I found both planets (which are both behind the house I used as my reference point). I did show both planets to my neighbors and I also showed them Jupiter, Vega and the moon. I still can't find saturn yet as I forgot where it was from last night when I observed it. It is very low and does not offer much detail.



              Douglas A. Norton
              Department of Technology & Information
              William Penn Data Center
              Phone: 302-739-9604
              Fax: 302-739-3925
              Email: Douglas.Norton@...

              Sent from my BlackBerry Wireless Handheld


              -----Original Message-----
              From: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com <delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com>
              To: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com <delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Sun Jun 19 20:47:53 2005
              Subject: Re: [delmarvastargazers] June Happenings...

              Doug,

              I'm new at this but I don't understand this. You said in this note to get out your telescope before the sum sets and the other memo where you say you are looking at Mercury and Venus was sent at 8:30 before the sun had set.  My question is, if you can't see Polaris to find North or any other stars to align your telescope with how do you find Mercury and Venus before it gets dark?

              Mike Enright

              "Norton Douglas (DTI)" <douglas.norton@...> wrote:

                      OK folks, just in case you weren't aware, Mercury is going to quickly pass Venus in the sky and will actually be in the same eyepiece field of view on the 26th and 27th of June. Beginning June 24th start watching Mercury get closer to Venus on successive nights. This should prove to be not only a good opportunity visually but photographically as well. So get out the scope as early as possible before the sun sets and start searching for Venus. At their closest they will be a mere 9 arc minutes away from each other. I can say from my own personal experience, seeing Mercury is very exciting and very rewarding. It is a tiny object and seeing the phase on it is very neat. So mark your calendars and get out starting the 24th of June and keep watching until the 30th. Clear skies!
                     
                     
                     
                      Douglas A. Norton
                      Department of Technology & Information
                      William Penn Data Center
                      Phone: 302-739-9604
                      Fax: 302-739-3925
                      Email: Douglas.Norton@...
                     
                      Sent from my BlackBerry Wireless Handheld
                     

              __________________________________________________
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            • Norton Douglas (DTI)
              When June 24th gets closer it will be easier to find Mercury. If anyone sees this planet earlier in the evening or has a better horizon and atmosphere, confirm
              Message 6 of 10 , Jun 19 6:07 PM
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                Re: [delmarvastargazers] June Happenings...

                When June 24th gets closer it will be easier to find Mercury. If anyone sees this planet earlier in the evening or has a better horizon and atmosphere, confirm the phase for me. It looked like the moon when it is a few days past half. Waxing I believe is the correct term. (Not much of a good memory when it comes to moon phases... Sorry.



                Douglas A. Norton
                Department of Technology & Information
                William Penn Data Center
                Phone: 302-739-9604
                Fax: 302-739-3925
                Email: Douglas.Norton@...

                Sent from my BlackBerry Wireless Handheld


                -----Original Message-----
                From: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com <delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com>
                To: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com <delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Sun Jun 19 20:54:22 2005
                Subject: Re: [delmarvastargazers] June Happenings...

                Venus is often pretty bright and can sometimes be seen before the sun
                sets.  Especially if you know where to look in the sky, using landmarks
                on the horizon.  Once you see them after it's darker, it's not too hard
                to come back the next night and find them before sunset.  This is way
                easier if you use simple binoculars. 

                If your telescope has a equatorial mount and you are setting up at a
                standard place ... like a drive way, you can mark where the tripod legs
                need to go to get rough alignment using chalk or paint.  For visual use,
                normally a telescope doesn't have to be all that well polar aligned to
                use looking through the eyepiece.  However, if you are using a computer
                to find the object, all bets are off... I would suspect your alignment
                would have to be somewhat close.

                Bob Bunge

                Michael Enright wrote:

                > Doug,

                > I'm new at this but I don't understand this. You said in this note to
                > get out your telescope before the sum sets and the other memo where
                > you say you are looking at Mercury and Venus was sent at 8:30 before
                > the sun had set.  My question is, if you can't see Polaris to find
                > North or any other stars to align your telescope with how do you find
                > Mercury and Venus before it gets dark?

                > Mike Enright
                >
                > */"Norton Douglas (DTI)" <douglas.norton@...>/* wrote:
                >
                >     OK folks, just in case you weren't aware, Mercury is going to
                >     quickly pass Venus in the sky and will actually be in the same
                >     eyepiece field of view on the 26th and 27th of June. Beginning
                >     June 24th start watching Mercury get closer to Venus on successive
                >     nights. This should prove to be not only a good opportunity
                >     visually but photographically as well. So get out the scope as
                >     early as possible before the sun sets and start searching for
                >     Venus. At their closest they will be a mere 9 arc minutes away
                >     from each other. I can say from my own personal experience, seeing
                >     Mercury is very exciting and very rewarding. It is a tiny object
                >     and seeing the phase on it is very neat. So mark your calendars
                >     and get out starting the 24th of June and keep watching until the
                >     30th. Clear skies!
                >
                >
                >
                >     Douglas A. Norton
                >     Department of Technology & Information
                >     William Penn Data Center
                >     Phone: 302-739-9604
                >     Fax: 302-739-3925
                >     Email: Douglas.Norton@...
                >
                >     Sent from my BlackBerry Wireless Handheld
                >
                > __________________________________________________
                > Do You Yahoo!?
                > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                > http://mail.yahoo.com
                > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                > *Yahoo! Groups Links*
                >
                >     * To visit your group on the web, go to:
                >       http://groups.yahoo.com/group/delmarvastargazers/
                >       
                >     * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                >       delmarvastargazers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                >       <mailto:delmarvastargazers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe>
                >       
                >     * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                >       Service <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>.
                >
                >



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              • Norton Douglas (DTI)
                I found Saturn. It is very close to Venus naked eye. I ran out in the street to see if I could spot it. It s two or three binocular fields away to the
                Message 7 of 10 , Jun 19 6:13 PM
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                  Re: [delmarvastargazers] June Happenings...

                  I found Saturn. It is very close to Venus naked eye. I ran out in the street to see if I could spot it. It's two or three binocular fields away to the northwest. Very low.



                  Douglas A. Norton
                  Department of Technology & Information
                  William Penn Data Center
                  Phone: 302-739-9604
                  Fax: 302-739-3925
                  Email: Douglas.Norton@...

                  Sent from my BlackBerry Wireless Handheld


                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com <delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com>
                  To: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com <delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Sun Jun 19 20:54:22 2005
                  Subject: Re: [delmarvastargazers] June Happenings...

                  Venus is often pretty bright and can sometimes be seen before the sun
                  sets.  Especially if you know where to look in the sky, using landmarks
                  on the horizon.  Once you see them after it's darker, it's not too hard
                  to come back the next night and find them before sunset.  This is way
                  easier if you use simple binoculars. 

                  If your telescope has a equatorial mount and you are setting up at a
                  standard place ... like a drive way, you can mark where the tripod legs
                  need to go to get rough alignment using chalk or paint.  For visual use,
                  normally a telescope doesn't have to be all that well polar aligned to
                  use looking through the eyepiece.  However, if you are using a computer
                  to find the object, all bets are off... I would suspect your alignment
                  would have to be somewhat close.

                  Bob Bunge

                  Michael Enright wrote:

                  > Doug,

                  > I'm new at this but I don't understand this. You said in this note to
                  > get out your telescope before the sum sets and the other memo where
                  > you say you are looking at Mercury and Venus was sent at 8:30 before
                  > the sun had set.  My question is, if you can't see Polaris to find
                  > North or any other stars to align your telescope with how do you find
                  > Mercury and Venus before it gets dark?

                  > Mike Enright
                  >
                  > */"Norton Douglas (DTI)" <douglas.norton@...>/* wrote:
                  >
                  >     OK folks, just in case you weren't aware, Mercury is going to
                  >     quickly pass Venus in the sky and will actually be in the same
                  >     eyepiece field of view on the 26th and 27th of June. Beginning
                  >     June 24th start watching Mercury get closer to Venus on successive
                  >     nights. This should prove to be not only a good opportunity
                  >     visually but photographically as well. So get out the scope as
                  >     early as possible before the sun sets and start searching for
                  >     Venus. At their closest they will be a mere 9 arc minutes away
                  >     from each other. I can say from my own personal experience, seeing
                  >     Mercury is very exciting and very rewarding. It is a tiny object
                  >     and seeing the phase on it is very neat. So mark your calendars
                  >     and get out starting the 24th of June and keep watching until the
                  >     30th. Clear skies!
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >     Douglas A. Norton
                  >     Department of Technology & Information
                  >     William Penn Data Center
                  >     Phone: 302-739-9604
                  >     Fax: 302-739-3925
                  >     Email: Douglas.Norton@...
                  >
                  >     Sent from my BlackBerry Wireless Handheld
                  >
                  > __________________________________________________
                  > Do You Yahoo!?
                  > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                  > http://mail.yahoo.com
                  > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  > *Yahoo! Groups Links*
                  >
                  >     * To visit your group on the web, go to:
                  >       http://groups.yahoo.com/group/delmarvastargazers/
                  >       
                  >     * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  >       delmarvastargazers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  >       <mailto:delmarvastargazers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe>
                  >       
                  >     * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                  >       Service <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>.
                  >
                  >



                  Yahoo! Groups Links

                  <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
                      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/delmarvastargazers/

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                • Michael P. Borgia
                  Re: [delmarvastargazers] June Happenings...When in the evening sky, Mercury is actually waning from full through a gibbous phase. Mike ... From: Norton
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jun 19 8:32 PM
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                    Re: [delmarvastargazers] June Happenings...
                    When in the evening sky, Mercury is actually "waning" from full through a "gibbous" phase. 
                     
                    Mike
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: Sunday, June 19, 2005 9:07 PM
                    Subject: Re: [delmarvastargazers] June Happenings...

                    When June 24th gets closer it will be easier to find Mercury. If anyone sees this planet earlier in the evening or has a better horizon and atmosphere, confirm the phase for me. It looked like the moon when it is a few days past half. Waxing I believe is the correct term. (Not much of a good memory when it comes to moon phases... Sorry.



                    Douglas A. Norton
                    Department of Technology & Information
                    William Penn Data Center
                    Phone: 302-739-9604
                    Fax: 302-739-3925
                    Email: Douglas.Norton@...

                    Sent from my BlackBerry Wireless Handheld


                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com <delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com>
                    To: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com <delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Sun Jun 19 20:54:22 2005
                    Subject: Re: [delmarvastargazers] June Happenings...

                    Venus is often pretty bright and can sometimes be seen before the sun
                    sets.  Especially if you know where to look in the sky, using landmarks
                    on the horizon.  Once you see them after it's darker, it's not too hard
                    to come back the next night and find them before sunset.  This is way
                    easier if you use simple binoculars. 

                    If your telescope has a equatorial mount and you are setting up at a
                    standard place ... like a drive way, you can mark where the tripod legs
                    need to go to get rough alignment using chalk or paint.  For visual use,
                    normally a telescope doesn't have to be all that well polar aligned to
                    use looking through the eyepiece.  However, if you are using a computer
                    to find the object, all bets are off... I would suspect your alignment
                    would have to be somewhat close.

                    Bob Bunge

                    Michael Enright wrote:

                    > Doug,

                    > I'm new at this but I don't understand this. You said in this note to
                    > get out your telescope before the sum sets and the other memo where
                    > you say you are looking at Mercury and Venus was sent at 8:30 before
                    > the sun had set.  My question is, if you can't see Polaris to find
                    > North or any other stars to align your telescope with how do you find
                    > Mercury and Venus before it gets dark?

                    > Mike Enright
                    >
                    > */"Norton Douglas (DTI)" <douglas.norton@...>/* wrote:
                    >
                    >     OK folks, just in case you weren't aware, Mercury is going to
                    >     quickly pass Venus in the sky and will actually be in the same
                    >     eyepiece field of view on the 26th and 27th of June. Beginning
                    >     June 24th start watching Mercury get closer to Venus on successive
                    >     nights. This should prove to be not only a good opportunity
                    >     visually but photographically as well. So get out the scope as
                    >     early as possible before the sun sets and start searching for
                    >     Venus. At their closest they will be a mere 9 arc minutes away
                    >     from each other. I can say from my own personal experience, seeing
                    >     Mercury is very exciting and very rewarding. It is a tiny object
                    >     and seeing the phase on it is very neat. So mark your calendars
                    >     and get out starting the 24th of June and keep watching until the
                    >     30th. Clear skies!
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >     Douglas A. Norton
                    >     Department of Technology & Information
                    >     William Penn Data Center
                    >     Phone: 302-739-9604
                    >     Fax: 302-739-3925
                    >     Email: Douglas.Norton@...
                    >
                    >     Sent from my BlackBerry Wireless Handheld
                    >
                    > __________________________________________________
                    > Do You Yahoo!?
                    > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                    > http://mail.yahoo.com
                    > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    > *Yahoo! Groups Links*
                    >
                    >     * To visit your group on the web, go to:
                    >       http://groups.yahoo.com/group/delmarvastargazers/
                    >       
                    >     * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                    >       delmarvastargazers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    >       <mailto:delmarvastargazers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe>
                    >       
                    >     * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                    >       Service <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>.
                    >
                    >



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                  • Michael P. Borgia
                    Re: [delmarvastargazers] June Happenings... Just for the record, Mercury is about 2.6 degrees to the lower right of Venus tomorrow night (June 20,2005).
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jun 19 8:43 PM
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                      Re: [delmarvastargazers] June Happenings...
                          Just for the record, Mercury is about 2.6 degrees to the lower right of Venus tomorrow night (June 20,2005).  Mercury is magnitude -0.5 and its disk is 73% illuminated and barely 5" across.  Mercury tends to take on a pinkish hue in telescopes because of atmospheric refraction.
                       
                          Venus by comparison is pure white, the real color shines through because it is so bright.  Tomorrow Venus is magnitude -3.7 and its disk is 92% illuminated and about 10" across, about as small and "faint" (relative term) as it can ever be.  Venus' appearance will not change much during this conjunction period.  Mercury however will change from night to night.  Watch as it gets bigger, slimmer and fainter each night.
                       
                          Over the next few days Mercury will close to within less than 0.1 degree of Venus but will never pass it.  Mercury will reach greatest elongation on the night of the 24th, hang very close to Venus for a couple of days, then retreat back in the direction it came from and will fade out of view within the next few days.
                       
                      Mike
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: Sunday, June 19, 2005 9:02 PM
                      Subject: Re: [delmarvastargazers] June Happenings...

                      Bob is right. Last night I marked where Venus was by a house it sets behind so I knew about where it should have been tonight. Using the chart in the Canadian astronomy magazine I had to search in ever widening circles to find Mercury. Venus is easily seen way before the sun sets. So that's how I found both planets (which are both behind the house I used as my reference point). I did show both planets to my neighbors and I also showed them Jupiter, Vega and the moon. I still can't find saturn yet as I forgot where it was from last night when I observed it. It is very low and does not offer much detail.



                      Douglas A. Norton
                      Department of Technology & Information
                      William Penn Data Center
                      Phone: 302-739-9604
                      Fax: 302-739-3925
                      Email: Douglas.Norton@...

                      Sent from my BlackBerry Wireless Handheld


                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com <delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com>
                      To: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com <delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Sun Jun 19 20:47:53 2005
                      Subject: Re: [delmarvastargazers] June Happenings...

                      Doug,

                      I'm new at this but I don't understand this. You said in this note to get out your telescope before the sum sets and the other memo where you say you are looking at Mercury and Venus was sent at 8:30 before the sun had set.  My question is, if you can't see Polaris to find North or any other stars to align your telescope with how do you find Mercury and Venus before it gets dark?

                      Mike Enright

                      "Norton Douglas (DTI)" <douglas.norton@...> wrote:

                              OK folks, just in case you weren't aware, Mercury is going to quickly pass Venus in the sky and will actually be in the same eyepiece field of view on the 26th and 27th of June. Beginning June 24th start watching Mercury get closer to Venus on successive nights. This should prove to be not only a good opportunity visually but photographically as well. So get out the scope as early as possible before the sun sets and start searching for Venus. At their closest they will be a mere 9 arc minutes away from each other. I can say from my own personal experience, seeing Mercury is very exciting and very rewarding. It is a tiny object and seeing the phase on it is very neat. So mark your calendars and get out starting the 24th of June and keep watching until the 30th. Clear skies!
                             
                             
                             
                              Douglas A. Norton
                              Department of Technology & Information
                              William Penn Data Center
                              Phone: 302-739-9604
                              Fax: 302-739-3925
                              Email: Douglas.Norton@...
                             
                              Sent from my BlackBerry Wireless Handheld
                             

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                    • David M Groski
                      Since Venus and Mercury stay close to the horizon at sunset/sunrise, they are best viewed in the daytime when they are high in the sky. Venus is easily seen in
                      Message 10 of 10 , Jun 20 7:29 AM
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Since Venus and Mercury stay close to the horizon at sunset/sunrise, they
                        are best viewed in the daytime when they are high in the sky. Venus is
                        easily seen in the daytime with a pair of binoculars and once you know were
                        it look is easily seen with the an aided eye. If you have a GOTO telescope
                        or one with setting circles, it easy to find the planets and many of the
                        brighter stars in the daytime. For a 'scope with standard setting circles,
                        just set the 'scope up the night before and get it polar aligned and mark
                        the position of the tripod legs. The next day set it up in the same spot,
                        use the Sun or the Moon to set the circles to the read correctly and dial
                        up Venus or the Moon They will be visible in your finder and once centered
                        in your 'scope you can refine the settings of your circles and find
                        Mercury and the other planets. I've viewed Saturn anumber of time in broad
                        daylight. Mars is also easy in the daytime.
                        If you have a GOTO 'scope you can use the Sun or the Moon to align it,
                        find Venus or the Moon and 'Sync' on it to refine your alignment, then look
                        for the other planets and bright stars. The Summer is great time to view
                        some the bright winter stars in the daytime, Sirus, Capella, Castor, Pollux
                        are pretty easy when we get one of those high pressure fronts that give use
                        those dark blue skies.

                        - Dave



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