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Re: [delmarvastargazers] Re: "normal" Arps??

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  • Frank Sheldon
    Bob, Bob, Back in December of 2001, we had a speaker talking on the Big Bang dilemma in which the subject of Halton Arp and Arp galaxies came up. I m am
    Message 1 of 11 , Nov 10, 2004
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      Bob,
      Bob,
      Back in December of 2001, we had a speaker talking on the Big Bang dilemma in which the subject of Halton Arp and Arp galaxies came up.  I'm am little fuzzy on the details but as I remember, Arp rejected the  Big Bang theory and the Arp galaxies were part of his evidence.  Apparently these galaxies have components which exhibit different red shifts therebye refuting the theory that red shift necessarily indicates that high red shift objects are far away.   Do you know antthing about this aspect?
      Frank Sheldon
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Bob Bunge" <bbunge@...>
      Sent: Tuesday, November 09, 2004 8:33 PM
      Subject: Re: [delmarvastargazers] Re: "normal" Arps??

      >
      > That's
      pretty funny, although in my case, I'm pretty much left with the
      > faint
      ones.  Just seeing them is the challenge.
      >
      > Bob
      >
    • Bob Bunge
      I believe your story is pretty much correct, but I don t have anything to add in that aspect. But... The Arp list is a good list for amateurs with moderate to
      Message 2 of 11 , Nov 10, 2004
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        I believe your story is pretty much correct, but I don't have anything
        to add in that aspect. But...

        The Arp list is a good list for amateurs with moderate to large scopes
        as there is a wide varity in type and brightness of galaxies on the
        list... from brighter multiple galaxies that appear to be interacting in
        the eyepiece view to very difficult faint objects. Most of the objects
        are pretty well studied, so there are photos on the web for all
        (including a number of websites by amateurs - the Astro League list was
        originally designed for CCD imagers) to a couple of sites that have put
        up scans of Arp's original photos.

        Info on the AL Arp club is here:

        http://www.astroleague.org/al/obsclubs/arppec/arppec.html

        FYI, I took the "rules" of the "club" and extended them in that I have a
        goal of observing all 327 of the objects, record my impressions in words
        AND make a eyepeice drawing of each. I haven't counted up since last
        Friday, but I think I'm missing about 80 objects at this time. Most are
        faint late fall, or early spring objects or brighter winter time objects.

        For me, this has been a great and very fun project that has required
        miminal homework in order to see fun and challenging objects. I just
        work from the known list. Before I had started, I had already seen
        about a hundred of the objects over the prior 15 years, but had not
        recorded them in a standard way.

        So that's why I tend to set up my 20-inch off to the side of any group
        at Tuckahoe. If you walk by and ask what I'm looking at, you are
        welcome to wait until I have one in the eyepiece, but the view might not
        be very sexy. :-)

        Clear Skies,

        Bob

        Frank Sheldon wrote:
        > Bob,
        > Bob,
        > Back in December of 2001, we had a speaker talking on the /Big Bang/
        > dilemma in which the subject of Halton Arp and Arp galaxies came up.
        > I'm am little fuzzy on the details but as I remember, Arp rejected
        > the /Big Bang/ theory and the Arp galaxies were part of his evidence.
        > Apparently these galaxies have components which exhibit different red
        > shifts therebye refuting the theory that red shift necessarily indicates
        > that high red shift objects are far away. Do you know antthing about
        > this aspect?
        > Frank Sheldon
        >
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: "Bob Bunge" <bbunge@... <mailto:bbunge@...>>
        > To: <delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com
        > <mailto:delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com>>
        > Sent: Tuesday, November 09, 2004 8:33 PM
        > Subject: Re: [delmarvastargazers] Re: "normal" Arps??
        >
        > >
        > > That's pretty funny, although in my case, I'm pretty much left with the
        > > faint ones. Just seeing them is the challenge.
        > >
        > > Bob
        > >
      • marc feuerberg
        My read of the Arps is that they originally made it into his list of peculiar galaxies because of their irregular shapes, rather than their red shifts, which
        Message 3 of 11 , Nov 10, 2004
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          My read of the Arps is that they originally made it
          into his list of peculiar galaxies because of their
          irregular shapes, rather than their red shifts, which
          he studied later. I just completed observing 100 of
          them for the Astro League list, but found that few of
          them looked really odd. Faint maybe, but not all that
          odd! I'll add another plug to what Bob said about
          observing Arps, and that is how much they challenge,
          and thus improve, your observing skills. In fact, it
          wasn't until I started observing Arps that I realized
          that it's true about how higher magnification allows
          you to see fainter objects. I had never been
          convinced of that before, but on several of the Arps I
          could only see them at the higher magnifications.
          marc

          --- Bob Bunge <bbunge@...> wrote:

          >
          >
          > I believe your story is pretty much correct, but I
          > don't have anything
          > to add in that aspect. But...
          >
          > The Arp list is a good list for amateurs with
          > moderate to large scopes
          > as there is a wide varity in type and brightness of
          > galaxies on the
          > list... from brighter multiple galaxies that appear
          > to be interacting in
          > the eyepiece view to very difficult faint objects.
          > Most of the objects
          > are pretty well studied, so there are photos on the
          > web for all
          > (including a number of websites by amateurs - the
          > Astro League list was
          > originally designed for CCD imagers) to a couple of
          > sites that have put
          > up scans of Arp's original photos.
          >
          > Info on the AL Arp club is here:
          >
          >
          http://www.astroleague.org/al/obsclubs/arppec/arppec.html
          >
          > FYI, I took the "rules" of the "club" and extended
          > them in that I have a
          > goal of observing all 327 of the objects, record my
          > impressions in words
          > AND make a eyepeice drawing of each. I haven't
          > counted up since last
          > Friday, but I think I'm missing about 80 objects at
          > this time. Most are
          > faint late fall, or early spring objects or brighter
          > winter time objects.
          >
          > For me, this has been a great and very fun project
          > that has required
          > miminal homework in order to see fun and challenging
          > objects. I just
          > work from the known list. Before I had started, I
          > had already seen
          > about a hundred of the objects over the prior 15
          > years, but had not
          > recorded them in a standard way.
          >
          > So that's why I tend to set up my 20-inch off to the
          > side of any group
          > at Tuckahoe. If you walk by and ask what I'm
          > looking at, you are
          > welcome to wait until I have one in the eyepiece,
          > but the view might not
          > be very sexy. :-)
          >
          > Clear Skies,
          >
          > Bob
          >
          > Frank Sheldon wrote:
          > > Bob,
          > > Bob,
          > > Back in December of 2001, we had a speaker talking
          > on the /Big Bang/
          > > dilemma in which the subject of Halton Arp and Arp
          > galaxies came up.
          > > I'm am little fuzzy on the details but as I
          > remember, Arp rejected
          > > the /Big Bang/ theory and the Arp galaxies were
          > part of his evidence.
          > > Apparently these galaxies have components which
          > exhibit different red
          > > shifts therebye refuting the theory that red shift
          > necessarily indicates
          > > that high red shift objects are far away. Do you
          > know antthing about
          > > this aspect?
          > > Frank Sheldon
          > >
          > >
          > > ----- Original Message -----
          > > From: "Bob Bunge" <bbunge@...
          > <mailto:bbunge@...>>
          > > To: <delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com
          > > <mailto:delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com>>
          > > Sent: Tuesday, November 09, 2004 8:33 PM
          > > Subject: Re: [delmarvastargazers] Re: "normal"
          > Arps??
          > >
          > > >
          > > > That's pretty funny, although in my case, I'm
          > pretty much left with the
          > > > faint ones. Just seeing them is the challenge.
          > > >
          > > > Bob
          > > >
          >
          >
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