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Astronomy at the Library

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  • Jerry Truitt
    I have arranged with the Elkton Central Library on Newark Road in Elkton to hold an Astronomy night on Friday November 19th. 6-8:30 PM. The library is
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 14, 2004
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      I have arranged with the Elkton Central Library on Newark Road
      in Elkton to hold an Astronomy night on Friday November 19th. 6-8:30
      PM.
      The library is providing a protected court yard which has access
      to electricity for our use. They are also allowing us to use the
      meeting room and computer projector for presentations.
      I will give the NASA/JPL Night Sky network presentation
      PlanetQuest followed by the moon presentation James Morgan has
      developed for the public.
      The moon will be up early that night and we will proceed to
      viewing the moon after the presentations and instruction on how to
      use viewing equipment.
      If you can attend please let me know and let me know what
      viewing equipment you can bring to the event. Thanks Jerry
    • Jerry Truitt
      Keith Lohmeyer, Leonard White and I went to North County Library in Greensboro MD on Friday March 18th with telescopes in tow. We gave a short presentation
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 19, 2005
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        Keith Lohmeyer, Leonard White and I went to North County Library
        in Greensboro MD on Friday March 18th with telescopes in tow.
        We gave a short presentation using information from JPL Planet
        Quest explaining how we're finding distant worlds around far away
        stars. We distributed star maps that show which stars you can see
        with the naked eye that we know have planets around them.
        I had also been granted permission from Skymaps.com to
        distribute copies of their star charts for 2005 and provide them for
        the attendees also.
        After Planet Quest we gave a presentation on the Moon which is
        at first quarter. The presentation showed them some facts and
        features about our moon and also showed how it stacks up to other
        moons in our solar system. The presentation includes detailed
        explanation of the phases of the moon, an animation of a Lunation, a
        picture at apogee and perigee and my animation of last years eclipse.
        We next sent them out to the scopes and binoculars. It was a clear
        night with lots to look at in the sky. We spent some time on the
        moon, I had my Bushnell and children were able to use it and easily
        find the moon without any assistance from us.
        We pointed out features to look for on the moon, craters,
        mountains and lava flows.
        Saturn was without a doubt the hit of the event early on. Many
        just couldn't believe that you could see the rings. Titan was
        also
        clearly visible. When I got the power up we could even see some
        faint cloud bands on Saturn's surface. We were also able to see
        the
        Cassini division in the rings too.
        I put on my O-III filter and moved to Orion and M42. I don't
        think anyone had seen a nebula first hand before. They were really
        struck with its beauty.
        We had a couple of young people who brought their own
        telescopes. Leonard spent a lot of time with them. Showing them how
        to find things and giving tips on using the scopes.
        The crowd started to thin about 8:15 and we thought we were just
        about done. Someone asked about Jupiter, Keith looked over at the
        horizon and asked, "Is that Jupiter coming up now?" In the
        distance
        a big red ball of a star appeared to be rising. We turned our scopes
        on it and it was mighty Jupiter, red and waving through the thick
        atmosphere. You couldn't even see its moons at first.
        It's funny how things work out sometime, for as Jupiter
        climbed
        in the sky, and the moons came into view, the thick atmosphere which
        precipitated the red color actually acted as a filter, the cloud
        bands seemed to jump out. I have never seen them as prominent as
        they were last night.
        Needless to say, the crowd went wild, well for an astronomical
        event anyway. People were very excited to see Jupiter and the moons,
        but were most impressed with seeing the cloud bands so prominent.
        I think I can speak for all of us, we really enjoyed this event.
        We had a crowd of nice people who were thrilled by what we were able
        to show them.
        I put the club's web site first page as the cover with our
        address on the hand out and we encouraged people to stop by at a
        meeting and see us.
        This is logged as a JPL Night Sky Network event. Thanks Jerry
      • Steve Long
        Jerry, congratulations to you and Keith and Leonard. Sounds like you put on a great show! (With a little help from the Moon, Saturn Jupiter, and Orion, of
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 19, 2005
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          Jerry, congratulations to you and Keith and Leonard. Sounds like you put
          on a great show! (With a little help from the Moon, Saturn Jupiter, and
          Orion, of course.)

          Steve
        • Michael Enright
          I m curious. What size scope did you use to view Saturn and Titan? Mike Jerry Truitt wrote: Keith Lohmeyer, Leonard White and I went to
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 21, 2005
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            I"m curious. What size scope did you use to view Saturn and Titan?
             
            Mike

            Jerry Truitt <Truittjs@...> wrote:

                Keith Lohmeyer, Leonard White and I went to North County Library
            in Greensboro MD on Friday March 18th with telescopes in tow.
                We gave a short presentation using information from JPL Planet
            Quest explaining how we're finding distant worlds around far away
            stars. We distributed star maps that show which stars you can see
            with the naked eye that we know have planets around them.
                I had also been granted permission from Skymaps.com to
            distribute copies of their star charts for 2005 and provide them for
            the attendees also.
                After Planet Quest we gave a presentation on the Moon which is
            at first quarter. The presentation showed them some facts and
            features about our moon and also showed how it stacks up to other
            moons in our solar system. The presentation includes detailed
            explanation of the phases of the moon, an animation of a Lunation, a
            picture at apogee and perigee and my animation of last years eclipse.
            We next sent them out to the scopes and binoculars. It was a clear
            night with lots to look at in the sky. We spent some time on the
            moon, I had my Bushnell and children were able to use it and easily
            find the moon without any assistance from us.
                We pointed out features to look for on the moon, craters,
            mountains and lava flows.
                Saturn was without a doubt the hit of the event early on. Many
            just couldn't believe that you could see the rings. Titan was
            also
            clearly visible. When I got the power up we could even see some
            faint cloud bands on Saturn's surface. We were also able to see
            the
            Cassini division in the rings too.
                I put on my O-III filter and moved to Orion and M42. I don't
            think anyone had seen a nebula first hand before. They were really
            struck with its beauty.
                We had a couple of young people who brought their own
            telescopes. Leonard spent a lot of time with them. Showing them how
            to find things and giving tips on using the scopes.
                The crowd started to thin about 8:15 and we thought we were just
            about done. Someone asked about Jupiter, Keith looked over at the
            horizon and asked, "Is that Jupiter coming up now?" In the
            distance
            a big red ball of a star appeared to be rising. We turned our scopes
            on it and it was mighty Jupiter, red and waving through the thick
            atmosphere. You couldn't even see its moons at first.
                It's funny how things work out sometime, for as Jupiter
            climbed
            in the sky, and the moons came into view, the thick atmosphere which
            precipitated the red color actually acted as a filter, the cloud
            bands seemed to jump out. I have never seen them as prominent as
            they were last night.
                Needless to say, the crowd went wild, well for an astronomical
            event anyway. People were very excited to see Jupiter and the moons,
            but were most impressed with seeing the cloud bands so prominent.
                I think I can speak for all of us, we really enjoyed this event.
            We had a crowd of nice people who were thrilled by what we were able
            to show them.
                I put the club's web site first page as the cover with our
            address on the hand out and we encouraged people to stop by at a
            meeting and see us.
            This is logged as a JPL Night Sky Network event. Thanks Jerry





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          • Keith Lohmeyer
            Mike, We were using 4.5 and 10 reflectors. Keith ... From: Michael Enright To: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com Sent: Monday, March 21, 2005 10:06 AM
            Message 5 of 8 , Mar 21, 2005
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              Mike,
              We were using 4.5" and 10" reflectors.
               
              Keith
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Monday, March 21, 2005 10:06 AM
              Subject: Re: [delmarvastargazers] Astronomy at the Library

              I"m curious. What size scope did you use to view Saturn and Titan?
               
              Mike

              Jerry Truitt <Truittjs@...> wrote:

                  Keith Lohmeyer, Leonard White and I went to North County Library
              in Greensboro MD on Friday March 18th with telescopes in tow.
                  We gave a short presentation using information from JPL Planet
              Quest explaining how we're finding distant worlds around far away
              stars. We distributed star maps that show which stars you can see
              with the naked eye that we know have planets around them.
                  I had also been granted permission from Skymaps.com to
              distribute copies of their star charts for 2005 and provide them for
              the attendees also.
                  After Planet Quest we gave a presentation on the Moon which is
              at first quarter. The presentation showed them some facts and
              features about our moon and also showed how it stacks up to other
              moons in our solar system. The presentation ! includes detailed
              explanation of the phases of the moon, an animation of a Lunation, a
              picture at apogee and perigee and my animation of last years eclipse.
              We next sent them out to the scopes and binoculars. It was a clear
              night with lots to look at in the sky. We spent some time on the
              moon, I had my Bushnell and children were able to use it and easily
              find the moon without any assistance from us.
                  We pointed out features to look for on the moon, craters,
              mountains and lava flows.
                  Saturn was without a doubt the hit of the event early on. Many
              just couldn't believe that you could see the rings. Titan was
              also
              clearly visible. When I got the power up we could even see some
              faint cloud bands on Saturn's surface. We were also able to see
              the
              Cassini division in the rings too.
                  I put on my O-III filter and moved to Orion and M42. I don't
              think anyone had seen a nebula f! irst hand before. They were really
              struck with its beauty.
                  We had a couple of young people who brought their own
              telescopes. Leonard spent a lot of time with them. Showing them how
              to find things and giving tips on using the scopes.
                  The crowd started to thin about 8:15 and we thought we were just
              about done. Someone asked about Jupiter, Keith looked over at the
              horizon and asked, "Is that Jupiter coming up now?" In the
              distance
              a big red ball of a star appeared to be rising. We turned our scopes
              on it and it was mighty Jupiter, red and waving through the thick
              atmosphere. You couldn't even see its moons at first.
                  It's funny how things work out sometime, for as Jupiter
              climbed
              in the sky, and the moons came into view, the thick atmosphere which
              precipitated the red color actually acted as a filter, the cloud
              bands seemed to jump out. I have never seen them as prominen! t as
              they were last night.
                  Needless to say, the crowd went wild, well for an astronomical
              event anyway. People were very excited to see Jupiter and the moons,
              but were most impressed with seeing the cloud bands so prominent.
                  I think I can speak for all of us, we really enjoyed this event.
              We had a crowd of nice people who were thrilled by what we were able
              to show them.
                  I put the club's web site first page as the cover with our
              address on the hand out and we encouraged people to stop by at a
              meeting and see us.
              This is logged as a JPL Night Sky Network event. Thanks Jerry





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            • Jerry Truitt
              Prior to our Astronomy at the Library outreach at Greensboro Friday night I had received an e-mail. The e-mail was obviously from someone young and stated they
              Message 6 of 8 , Mar 21, 2005
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                Prior to our Astronomy at the Library outreach at Greensboro
                Friday night I had received an e-mail. The e-mail was obviously from
                someone young and stated they were interested in astronomy, had their
                own telescope and wanted to come to the event.
                This engaging young man showed up with his telescope, a Mead ETX.
                I enjoyed talking and interacting with him immensely. There is
                nothing more satisfying than seeing a youth excited about science.
                He also noted that he was reading books to learn because he had
                no one to show him things. He said there was no place around where he
                could go and meet others his age that were interested in astronomy.
                This is one of the things Don had mentioned needed to be done in
                his presentation to DAS about DMSG. The problem is how do you do it
                and what about the liability?
                I don't know, but I'm going to try to find out. We as an
                organization need to reach out to the youth of America. Getting them
                excited about astronomy is getting them excited about science. This
                seems like a natural thing we should do.
                I have a lot of experiance working with our youth, I'm willing
                to take on this project as I think it will be very worth while.
                I will have a proposal ready for our April meeting on starting a
                Junior Delmarva Stargazers club.
                .
              • Jerry Truitt
                CJ, I just scheduled the Greensboro library for November 16 at 6:30 PM for Astronomy at the library. All the talk here about IDs and hot dogs, I know one guy
                Message 7 of 8 , Oct 11, 2005
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                  CJ, I just scheduled the Greensboro library for November 16 at
                  6:30 PM for Astronomy at the library.
                  All the talk here about IDs and hot dogs, I know one guy who's
                  going to lo-jack his hot dogs next year.
                  Kent, thank you again for allowing me to see the Vail Nebula with
                  your 25" scope. Wow!
                • Charles Wood Jr.
                  Great! I ll be there
                  Message 8 of 8 , Oct 12, 2005
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                    Great! I'll be there
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