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Apogee 25 x 100's update

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  • Eric Todd
    Well, I m happy to say that the binoculars finally arrived the Monday after Christmas. The delay time was significant compared to what Apogee quoted to me on
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 1, 2004
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      Well, I'm happy to say that the binoculars finally arrived the Monday after Christmas.  The delay time was significant compared to what Apogee quoted to me on the phone (they said 2-3 weeks, but it took 6), but there was no damage and the packing was decent.  Still not having a tripod built (I was waiting on the binocs for dimensions) and desperate to try them, I fashioned a dovetail to couple the binoculars to the CG-5 mount. This is a temporary solution and the mounting is awkward, but it works ok for now.  I tried them out this past Monday night.
       
      My first target was the moon.  The craters popped out immediately and the view was crisp.  As expected from the reviews I read beforehand, there was a slight bluish glow along the edge of the moon.  To me, the color wasn't objectionable but maybe to some it would be.  Also, I noticed that my eyes weren't forcing the view together.  From what I understand, this means that the collimation is good, although I still have to officially check collimation.      
       
      My next target was Saturn.  I was pleasantly surprised to see the rings!  The view was sure tiny compared to what I am used to, but the planet was there and showed fairly accurate color.  
       
      I swung over to Mars, but there wasn't much to see.  I could tell that the planet was a disc maybe showing phase, but that's about all.  The color was fairly accurate here too, but the planet did seem "washed out".  Neighbor's spotlights are in that direction, so that's probably the cause.    
       
      I was then going to try for M31, but the odd configuration of the temporary setup wouldn't let me swing that high without great difficulty.  So, my last target of the evening was M42.
       
      This is where any defects in the binoculars showed themselves when I focused on the trapezium.  I could see some distortion in stars along the edge of the field (perhaps the outer third) and some coma in the center of one monocular.  The coma had me a bit worried at first, but once I refocused the one monocular, I believe it  disappeared (still have to reconfirm).  Overall, the nebulous regions were very faint and I could barely discern the two regions, but they were there.  I suspect light pollution from the moon and all the Christmas lights around here had something to do with it.  That night was far from dark!  I could resolve at least 3 trapezium stars, and maybe a 4th.     
       
      On the whole, I am quite pleased with these HUGE binoculars, especially when considering the price.  A tripod is a MUST though.  I tried hand holding these, but can do so for only a few seconds.  I look forward to trying them on a dark night.  Now I realize how "bad" my Focal 20 x 60's must have been from years ago, as I recall constantly forcing views together and the stars never focused as points.  I guess if I had a complaint, my only one would be having to refocus the monoculars if the eye or hand applies moderate pressure.  I had to refocus several times the other night.  However, once I get a more reasonable mount, I think that difficulty will disappear.  
       
      On a scale of 1 to 10, I'd give these binoculars an 8.
       
      Happy New Year,
      Eric Todd
       
    • Dave Wells
      My wife gave me a pair of Apogee 25x100 s for Christmas and they also arrived on Tuesday. Luckily I have an old tripod with liquid head that will hold them, so
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 1, 2004
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        My wife gave me a pair of Apogee 25x100's for Christmas and they
        also arrived on Tuesday. Luckily I have an old tripod with liquid
        head that will hold them, so I was able to try them out that night.
        I also was impressed with the clarity of the moon and was not
        displeased by the minor color along the outer edge. My view of M42
        was faint, obviously affected by the light pollution in Newark. I
        did not have to force convergence of the images at all and when
        looking tat the eyepieces in daylight the exit pupils both appeared
        round, so I feel the binoculars are well collimated. Yes there is
        some distortion of stars near the edge of the view, but for $250 I
        waqsn't expecting perfection. After my first views, under less than
        ideal conditions I would rate the bino's at 9 for bang for the buck.

        I look forward to mounting a red dot finder on them and modifying
        the mounting to the tripod to make it easier to view near the
        zenith. Long term I plan to build an Artemyeff Comet Couch to make
        viewing more comfortable; and I can't wait to get them to TSP for
        some dark skies.

        Dave
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