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More Planetary Nebulae

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  • kentblackwell
    Last night was supposed to be cloudy. As I stepped outside it was beautifully clear so the 25 got set up in the driveway. Even with that damn moon casting a
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 6, 2003
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      Last night was supposed to be cloudy. As I stepped outside it was
      beautifully clear so the 25" got set up in the driveway. Even with
      that damn moon casting a shadow of the telescope on the driveway I
      still thought it would be fun to try seeing a few small planetary
      nebulae. Though I did use a 25", all of these should be visible in an
      8" scope under a dark sky. These are interesting because they are
      quite bright, yet in more esoteric catalogs that Messier or NGC.

      IC 4997 Sge
      20h 20m
      +16 40'
      Mag 11.6
      Size 1.6"
      A bright and gloriously green nearly stellar PN at 200x. I knew it
      was a PN even unfiltered because of its tell-tale color. The OIII
      fitler confirmed, as it outshown everything else in the field of
      view. It blinks beautifully with 9.9 mag star GSC1631:1973, only 1.1'
      to the SW.

      IC 1747 Cas
      01h 57m
      +63 20'
      Mag 13.6
      Size 13"
      A small, slightly oblong shaped PN, fairly faint. Responds well to
      OIII filter. There are a number of stars in the field, mostly
      brighter than IC 1747. With the OIII fitler, the nebula nearly
      outshines them all.

      Hu 1-1 Cas
      PN G119.6-06
      00h 28m
      +55 59'
      Mag 13.3
      Size 5.0"
      I can't belive this is the first time I have ever observed this
      before, as it's quite bright. It's not stellar with averted vision,
      but nearly so. Quite blue in color. Responds well to OIII filter.


      Vyssotsky 11 Cas
      00h 18m
      +55 59'
      Magnitude 12.6
      Size 5.0"
      A small PN, but extended enough and bright enough for me to recognize
      it as a PN immediately, even without a filter on a bright moonlit
      night. By staring directly at it it disappears completely. MegaStar
      shows an associated 12.9 mag star superimposed over the PN, but I
      only see its faint 14.1 mag central star.

      Well, there you have it. Hope you see them on the next clear night.
      If you do, or have already done so please let me know.

      Kent Blackwell
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