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RE: [delmarvastargazers] Saturday, April 28th Tuckahoe...

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  • Dan Kidwell
    Doug, Heck of a write up. I m surprised you fully recovered so quickly. See you next time. Dan ... From: Norton Doug
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 30 11:42 AM
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      Doug,
      Heck of a write up. I'm surprised you fully recovered so quickly. See you
      next time.
      Dan

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Norton Doug [mailto:doug.norton@...]
      Sent: Monday, April 30, 2001 12:11 PM
      To: Delmarva Stargazers (E-mail)
      Subject: [delmarvastargazers] Saturday, April 28th Tuckahoe...

      Saturday April 28th,
      The moon was going to hang around for a while tonight but there was a pretty
      good chance that the skies would be as good as they were the previous
      Thursday. Since Thursday was a work night for me, I had to leave "early" at
      1:30am. But tonight I was going to stay till the cows came home, or at least
      the owls. There was quite a good showing of people too. Dan Kidwell, Steve
      Long, Tim Milligan, Teresa Young, Jesse Fortner, Dave Petrucci, Danka Gale
      and her husband Rob and myself. (Hope I got you all). I also expected a few
      visitors, people I knew from work. And I even had a few boy scouts come over
      and take a look at Jupiter, Saturn and the moon. It's great to show kids
      what they can see with a telescope. I brought my C8 and I spent almost the
      entire first half of the night showing things to people through my scope.
      Then Dan and I looked at the moon through my binocular viewers at the moon.
      Dan said it's the best view of the moon he's ever seen. It was a pretty
      remarkable sight. It wasn't until after midnight that I got down to
      business. That's when the moon set and when everyone that was looking
      through my scope decided they were too tired and too cold to stay any
      longer. Anyone that went home before the moon was down missed the most
      amazing night they surely would have ever seen. Dan, Tim and I managed to
      see M13 naked eye again. And the Milky Way literally looked like clouds in
      the sky. It was disgusting! Dan warned us that we had a cloudbank moving in
      from the east! And it really looked like there was. Stars were visible all
      the way down to the tree line.
      Teresa and Danka were doing an excellent job of finding objects in their
      scopes. They are really getting the hang of it and I'm afraid that they will
      be the ones writing these summaries in the near future! Teresa found several
      difficult objects including M53, M64 and M3. And all by star hopping using
      the Telrad finder charts. She had excellent images through her scope, a C8
      on a Great Polaris mount, and there was a great amount of detail in the
      images. The "black eye" galaxy was great because the dark lane showed itself
      nicely. M3 was excellent and showed lots of stars throughout the eyepiece!
      She is a real trooper, because even though she had a brace on her leg, she
      still managed to make it out to the field! And stayed until around 2:00am.
      Now that's dedication! I taught Danka how to star hop to the tiny galaxy,
      NGC6207, next to M13. She seemed surprised that it was so close and easy to
      see. She also had an excellent image of M13 in her scope as well. Her new
      Celestron binoculars also had super images. M81 and M82 as well as M3 were
      easily visible through them and had razor sharp images.
      Tim brought his 4-inch refractor to the field for the first time since I've
      known him. I had been giving him a hard time about never using it so he
      finally gave in and brought it. He tried to leave early but Dan and I forced
      him to stay even though he was cold. Dan gave him coffee and later
      remembered he had an Army jacket so we kept him there a little while longer.

      My original plan was to find the two asteroids, Hebe and Pallas and the last
      five Messier objects on my list to get the Messier certificate. But because
      of my visitors most of the evening, I gave up on finding the asteroids. From
      the previous Thursday night, I also wanted to find all 21 globular clusters
      in Ophiuchus. I actually had no intention of doing a "Globular Marathon" but
      since tonight was a rare one, I thought I could do it before twilight. I had
      prepared excellent and detailed finder charts for all of the objects I hoped
      to find. This allowed me plenty of time to take in each object in full
      detail, write a detailed description of each and run through each object
      with all powers going up and down the magnification range. But I got side
      tracked quite a bit with planetaries that were in nearby fields. It was
      impossible to pass these objects by. Dan was giving me a hard time warning
      me that I only had a few hours left to finish my Messier list. But I managed
      to finish it. I will just give the highlights of the best objects observed
      because I ended up finding 27 new objects and 18 of the 21 globulars in
      Ophiuchus.
      The two most memorable objects I found late in the search were the
      planetaries, NGC6445 and NGC6369. These sidetracked me for quite a while.
      NGC6369 was a wonderful object. It is a tiny version of the Ring Nebula in
      Lyra. It was a perfect circular smoke ring. I couldn't detect the central
      star but there was no doubt it was in the shape of a doughnut. I used my UHC
      filter on it and my 11mm Nagler to bring out more detail but the best view
      was with no filter and the 20mm Nagler. Dan looked at it through my scope
      but couldn't see the smoke ring. I looked it up when I got home and it is
      definitely there although it says that the ring effect doesn't show up in
      scopes smaller than 12". But I saw it, it's there. A testament to the night,
      or my eye? Probably the night.
      NGC6445 was an outstanding object. Right next to it in the same field was
      the globular, NGC6440. That is a really neat sight seeing two different
      objects in the same field. The only other example of that effect I have seen
      is with IC1295 and NGC6712 in Scutum. When I zoomed in on the planetary it
      had a decidedly elongated, bipolar appearance and seemed to be divided
      horizontally through the middle. Dan took a look through my scope and saw
      the elongation but not the division. I looked it up when I got home and
      there was no division but it was pinched in the middle, had dark lobes in
      the center of each lobe and looked like the dumbbell nebula in Vulpecula. I
      guess the dark lobes made it look like a division along with the pinch in
      the middle It was very tiny even at high power and the best views of it were
      with no filter using the 20mm Nagler.
      Another neat find was M73. It's listed as an Open Cluster and when I hopped
      to the field, all I saw was a triangle of stars. I had to ask Dan if what I
      was seeing was the cluster. It turns out it is just an asterism of four
      stars arranged in a Y-shape, but it looked more like a triangle to me. I had
      no idea what to expect because I try not to go out with any preconceived
      ideas of what an object is going to look like so I can sharpen my observing
      skills. And in this case, it threw me for a loop.
      The most challenging of the evening was NGC6366. This one turns out to be a
      twin of the other globular that took me more than five observing sessions to
      find, NGC5053. It is a large and extremely faint gathering of stars. It's
      spread so thin it was impossible to tell where the cluster ended and the sky
      began. Only a few of the brightest members would pop into view on occasion.
      I found this one only because of the practice I had with NGC5053. I had Dan
      come over and confirm it was there. It was only slightly easier to see than
      NGC5053.
      The last object of the evening was NGC7009, the Saturn Nebula. It was a very
      green object and only the 13mm Nagler showed the first hint of the "rings".
      The 11mm Nagler confirmed that they were there and showed the best view of
      it. I managed to find the last five objects on my Messier list, which
      included M72, M73, M54, M55 and M75. I was cutting it close though and had
      to give up my globular search in Ophiuchus to finish those Messier objects
      before twilight. I did it but I really did cut it close. The only other
      object I could find before it was too light was the Saturn nebula.
      I took a quick look at Mars before packing it up. It showed an incredible
      amount of detail and a very large disk. Tim and Teresa were the last two to
      leave before Dan and myself. I think they left around 2am. I don't remember.
      Dan and I left at twilight around 4:30am. Venus was showing itself very
      brightly above the tree line as we rolled out of the field. What a night!
      Doug Norton
      OIS/Customer Services
      Phone: 302.739.9524
      E-Mail: Doug.Norton@...




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    • tspg@tspg.com
      Hi Doug, This is Ray Lokay. Thanks for all the help last night at the meeting. I am on the way to www.angelfire.com now. I will look for postings for when you
      Message 2 of 3 , May 2, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Doug,
        This is Ray Lokay.
        Thanks for all the help last night at the meeting. I am on the way
        to
        www.angelfire.com now.
        I will look for postings for when you freelance at Tuckahoe. I would
        like to proceed on this new quest.
        With Best Regards,
        Ray

        --- In delmarvastargazers@y..., "Norton Doug" <doug.norton@e...>
        wrote:
        > Saturday April 28th,
        >
        > The moon was going to hang around for a while tonight but there was
        a
        > pretty good chance that the skies would be as good as they were the
        > previous Thursday. Since Thursday was a work night for me, I had to
        > leave "early" at 1:30am. But tonight I was going to stay till the
        cows
        > came home, or at least the owls. There was quite a good showing of
        > people too. Dan Kidwell, Steve Long, Tim Milligan, Teresa Young,
        Jesse
        > Fortner, Dave Petrucci, Danka Gale and her husband Rob and myself.
        (Hope
        > I got you all). I also expected a few visitors, people I knew from
        work.
        > And I even had a few boy scouts come over and take a look at
        Jupiter,
        > Saturn and the moon. It's great to show kids what they can see with
        a
        > telescope. I brought my C8 and I spent almost the entire first half
        of
        > the night showing things to people through my scope. Then Dan and I
        > looked at the moon through my binocular viewers at the moon. Dan
        said
        > it's the best view of the moon he's ever seen. It was a pretty
        > remarkable sight. It wasn't until after midnight that I got down to
        > business. That's when the moon set and when everyone that was
        looking
        > through my scope decided they were too tired and too cold to stay
        any
        > longer. Anyone that went home before the moon was down missed the
        most
        > amazing night they surely would have ever seen. Dan, Tim and I
        managed
        > to see M13 naked eye again. And the Milky Way literally looked like
        > clouds in the sky. It was disgusting! Dan warned us that we had a
        > cloudbank moving in from the east! And it really looked like there
        was.
        > Stars were visible all the way down to the tree line.
        >
        > Teresa and Danka were doing an excellent job of finding objects in
        their
        > scopes. They are really getting the hang of it and I'm afraid that
        they
        > will be the ones writing these summaries in the near future! Teresa
        > found several difficult objects including M53, M64 and M3. And all
        by
        > star hopping using the Telrad finder charts. She had excellent
        images
        > through her scope, a C8 on a Great Polaris mount, and there was a
        great
        > amount of detail in the images. The "black eye" galaxy was great
        because
        > the dark lane showed itself nicely. M3 was excellent and showed
        lots
        of
        > stars throughout the eyepiece! She is a real trooper, because even
        > though she had a brace on her leg, she still managed to make it out
        to
        > the field! And stayed until around 2:00am. Now that's dedication! I
        > taught Danka how to star hop to the tiny galaxy, NGC6207, next to
        M13.
        > She seemed surprised that it was so close and easy to see. She also
        had
        > an excellent image of M13 in her scope as well. Her new Celestron
        > binoculars also had super images. M81 and M82 as well as M3 were
        easily
        > visible through them and had razor sharp images.
        >
        > Tim brought his 4-inch refractor to the field for the first time
        since
        > I've known him. I had been giving him a hard time about never using
        it
        > so he finally gave in and brought it. He tried to leave early but
        Dan
        > and I forced him to stay even though he was cold. Dan gave him
        coffee
        > and later remembered he had an Army jacket so we kept him there a
        little
        > while longer.
        >
        > My original plan was to find the two asteroids, Hebe and Pallas and
        the
        > last five Messier objects on my list to get the Messier
        certificate.
        But
        > because of my visitors most of the evening, I gave up on finding the
        > asteroids. From the previous Thursday night, I also wanted to find
        all
        > 21 globular clusters in Ophiuchus. I actually had no intention of
        doing
        > a "Globular Marathon" but since tonight was a rare one, I thought I
        > could do it before twilight. I had prepared excellent and detailed
        > finder charts for all of the objects I hoped to find. This allowed
        me
        > plenty of time to take in each object in full detail, write a
        detailed
        > description of each and run through each object with all powers
        going up
        > and down the magnification range. But I got side tracked quite a bit
        > with planetaries that were in nearby fields. It was impossible to
        pass
        > these objects by. Dan was giving me a hard time warning me that I
        only
        > had a few hours left to finish my Messier list. But I managed to
        finish
        > it. I will just give the highlights of the best objects observed
        because
        > I ended up finding 27 new objects and 18 of the 21 globulars in
        > Ophiuchus.
        >
        > The two most memorable objects I found late in the search were the
        > planetaries, NGC6445 and NGC6369. These sidetracked me for quite a
        > while. NGC6369 was a wonderful object. It is a tiny version of the
        Ring
        > Nebula in Lyra. It was a perfect circular smoke ring. I couldn't
        detect
        > the central star but there was no doubt it was in the shape of a
        > doughnut. I used my UHC filter on it and my 11mm Nagler to bring out
        > more detail but the best view was with no filter and the 20mm
        Nagler.
        > Dan looked at it through my scope but couldn't see the smoke ring. I
        > looked it up when I got home and it is definitely there although it
        says
        > that the ring effect doesn't show up in scopes smaller than 12".
        But
        I
        > saw it, it's there. A testament to the night, or my eye? Probably
        the
        > night.
        >
        > NGC6445 was an outstanding object. Right next to it in the same
        field
        > was the globular, NGC6440. That is a really neat sight seeing two
        > different objects in the same field. The only other example of that
        > effect I have seen is with IC1295 and NGC6712 in Scutum. When I
        zoomed
        > in on the planetary it had a decidedly elongated, bipolar
        appearance
        and
        > seemed to be divided horizontally through the middle. Dan took a
        look
        > through my scope and saw the elongation but not the division. I
        looked
        > it up when I got home and there was no division but it was pinched
        in
        > the middle, had dark lobes in the center of each lobe and looked
        like
        > the dumbbell nebula in Vulpecula. I guess the dark lobes made it
        look
        > like a division along with the pinch in the middle It was very tiny
        even
        > at high power and the best views of it were with no filter using the
        > 20mm Nagler.
        >
        > Another neat find was M73. It's listed as an Open Cluster and when I
        > hopped to the field, all I saw was a triangle of stars. I had to
        ask
        Dan
        > if what I was seeing was the cluster. It turns out it is just an
        > asterism of four stars arranged in a Y-shape, but it looked more
        like a
        > triangle to me. I had no idea what to expect because I try not to
        go
        out
        > with any preconceived ideas of what an object is going to look like
        so I
        > can sharpen my observing skills. And in this case, it threw me for a
        > loop.
        >
        > The most challenging of the evening was NGC6366. This one turns out
        to
        > be a twin of the other globular that took me more than five
        observing
        > sessions to find, NGC5053. It is a large and extremely faint
        gathering
        > of stars. It's spread so thin it was impossible to tell where the
        > cluster ended and the sky began. Only a few of the brightest members
        > would pop into view on occasion. I found this one only because of
        the
        > practice I had with NGC5053. I had Dan come over and confirm it was
        > there. It was only slightly easier to see than NGC5053.
        >
        > The last object of the evening was NGC7009, the Saturn Nebula. It
        was a
        > very green object and only the 13mm Nagler showed the first hint of
        the
        > "rings". The 11mm Nagler confirmed that they were there and showed
        the
        > best view of it. I managed to find the last five objects on my
        Messier
        > list, which included M72, M73, M54, M55 and M75. I was cutting it
        close
        > though and had to give up my globular search in Ophiuchus to finish
        > those Messier objects before twilight. I did it but I really did
        cut
        it
        > close. The only other object I could find before it was too light
        was
        > the Saturn nebula.
        >
        > I took a quick look at Mars before packing it up. It showed an
        > incredible amount of detail and a very large disk. Tim and Teresa
        were
        > the last two to leave before Dan and myself. I think they left
        around
        > 2am. I don't remember. Dan and I left at twilight around 4:30am.
        Venus
        > was showing itself very brightly above the tree line as we rolled
        out of
        > the field. What a night!
        >
        > Doug Norton
        > OIS/Customer Services
        > Phone: 302.739.9524
        > E-Mail: Doug.Norton@e...
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