Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

star finding

Expand Messages
  • lance biechele
    Hi Folks,    I am trying to find a binary pair, but the directions are rather vague.    They all seem to agree 1 degree west and slightly N of another
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 5, 2014
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Folks,
         I am trying to find a binary pair, but the directions are rather vague.
         They all seem to agree "1 degree west and slightly N" of another
      obvious star pair.
         My question is:  How far is one degree from a star?  How does one
      determine this in a scope [i.e., is it different in a 4.5" and 6"?]
         I will appreciate any help with these questions.
      Thank you.
      Lance
    • Michael P. Borgia
      Well, it depends on a lot of things. The field of view of your scope depends upon the focal length and ratio of your telescope and the focal length and
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 5, 2014
      • 0 Attachment
        Well, it depends on a lot of things. The field of view of your scope depends upon the focal length and ratio of your telescope and the focal length and relative field of view of your eyepiece. The actual aperture of the telescope has little to do with field of view.  My CPC 1100 can have a field of view of nearly two degrees, or less than 1/8 degree depending upon what eyepiece is in it and if I'm using a focal reducer or Barlow. 

        Sent from my iPad

        On Jul 5, 2014, at 11:10 AM, "lance biechele ltb0076@... [delmarvastargazers]" <delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

         

        Hi Folks,
           I am trying to find a binary pair, but the directions are rather vague.
           They all seem to agree "1 degree west and slightly N" of another
        obvious star pair.
           My question is:  How far is one degree from a star?  How does one
        determine this in a scope [i.e., is it different in a 4.5" and 6"?]
           I will appreciate any help with these questions.
        Thank you.
        Lance

      • Greg Lee
        Adding to Mike s comments... One way to judge degrees in your particular scope/eyepiece combination is a moon width . The moon is about 1/2 degree wide - so
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 5, 2014
        • 0 Attachment
          Adding to Mike's comments...
          One way to judge degrees in your particular scope/eyepiece combination is a "moon width".  The moon is about 1/2 degree wide - so if you know your field of view is close to a full moon then you know you need to star hop about two fields to be about 1 degree from a known object.
          Another way is to compare your view to a star chart.  If you can identify two stars in your view with those on the chart you can measure on the chart to determine the degrees or minutes in your view.
          Greg


          On Sat, Jul 5, 2014 at 11:43 AM, 'Michael P. Borgia ' mborgia@... [delmarvastargazers] <delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
           

          Well, it depends on a lot of things. The field of view of your scope depends upon the focal length and ratio of your telescope and the focal length and relative field of view of your eyepiece. The actual aperture of the telescope has little to do with field of view.  My CPC 1100 can have a field of view of nearly two degrees, or less than 1/8 degree depending upon what eyepiece is in it and if I'm using a focal reducer or Barlow. 

          Sent from my iPad

          On Jul 5, 2014, at 11:10 AM, "lance biechele ltb0076@... [delmarvastargazers]" <delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

           

          Hi Folks,
             I am trying to find a binary pair, but the directions are rather vague.
             They all seem to agree "1 degree west and slightly N" of another
          obvious star pair.
             My question is:  How far is one degree from a star?  How does one
          determine this in a scope [i.e., is it different in a 4.5" and 6"?]
             I will appreciate any help with these questions.
          Thank you.
          Lance


        • Douglas Norton
          What binary are you looking for? Sent from my iPhone Douglas Norton www.douglasnorton.com IMCA #7432 www.imca.cc
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 5, 2014
          • 0 Attachment
            What binary are you looking for?

            Sent from my iPhone

            Douglas Norton
            IMCA #7432

            On Jul 5, 2014, at 11:10 AM, "lance biechele ltb0076@... [delmarvastargazers]" <delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

             

            Hi Folks,
               I am trying to find a binary pair, but the directions are rather vague.
               They all seem to agree "1 degree west and slightly N" of another
            obvious star pair.
               My question is:  How far is one degree from a star?  How does one
            determine this in a scope [i.e., is it different in a 4.5" and 6"?]
               I will appreciate any help with these questions.
            Thank you.
            Lance

          • lance biechele
            It s a difficult one - Struve 2398 [Draco] Thanks, Lance On Saturday, July 5, 2014 12:30 PM, Douglas Norton dnorton618@outlook.com [delmarvastargazers]
            Message 5 of 5 , Jul 5, 2014
            • 0 Attachment
              It's a difficult one - Struve 2398 [Draco]
              Thanks,
              Lance


              On Saturday, July 5, 2014 12:30 PM, "Douglas Norton dnorton618@... [delmarvastargazers]" <delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


               
              What binary are you looking for?

              Sent from my iPhone

              Douglas Norton
              IMCA #7432

              On Jul 5, 2014, at 11:10 AM, "lance biechele ltb0076@... [delmarvastargazers]" <delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

               
              Hi Folks,
                 I am trying to find a binary pair, but the directions are rather vague.
                 They all seem to agree "1 degree west and slightly N" of another
              obvious star pair.
                 My question is:  How far is one degree from a star?  How does one
              determine this in a scope [i.e., is it different in a 4.5" and 6"?]
                 I will appreciate any help with these questions.
              Thank you.
              Lance


            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.