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Re: [delmarvastargazers] Sunday April 27th Observation Notes

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  • jrtf
    Tuckahoe last Sunday night was indeed a very pleasant evening. The sky was quite dark and without clouds. Significant dew was at the rendez-vous but did not
    Message 1 of 2 , May 2, 2003
      Tuckahoe last Sunday night was indeed a very pleasant evening. The sky
      was quite dark and without clouds. Significant dew was at the rendez-vous
      but did not prevent observations.
      Besides looking at a few Messiers, I was most impressed by two objects.
      The first one, pointed to us by Dave and referred to by Ralph, was
      Caldwell 25
      (NGC 2419), an intergalactic cluster, going by the name of the
      Intergalactic Tramp" given
      to it by Shapley in 1944 and also by the name of the "Intergalactic
      Wanderer".
      It is a quite far cluster 275,000 light years away, way outside of our
      galaxy but is
      estimated to be gravity bound to our galaxy (and not really wandering about
      unbounded as thought at the time the name wanderer was given). Stars could
      not be distinguished in my 18" Obsession.
      The second object was Caldwell 35 (NGC 4889), an elliptical galaxy in
      Coma Berenices, mag 11.5. It was a dim sight in the 18" and
      for good reason: the distance is 300 million light years, approximately
      2% of
      the current estimate of the dimension of the universe. That was the
      farthest
      object I had ever looked at in a telescope.
      These two images stayed with me for a few days.
      The company (Ralph, Tim, Tom and Dave) was wonderful. It was a very
      delightful small scale star party.
      Jean-Paul Richard
    • David Corum
      I just wanted to say how much I enjoyed last Sunday night with Jean-Paul, Ralph, Tom, Tim, and Nathan. It was my first time at Tuckahoe, other than for
      Message 2 of 2 , May 3, 2003
        I just wanted to say how much I enjoyed last Sunday night with Jean-Paul,
        Ralph, Tom, Tim, and Nathan. It was my first time at Tuckahoe, other than
        for planned star parties. It's an hour and 20 minute drive from my home in
        Wheaton, MD -- but worth every mile. I'm guessing that the sky is a full
        magnitude darker than my usual observing site in northern Montgomery County,
        where the Southern sky is almost completely obliterated by the DC area. NGC
        2419, which Jean-Paul and Ralph referred to, is an extraordinary object to
        contemplate although not that exciting visually. Every reference I check
        gives widely varying reports on its distance, but all agree that its way way
        out there. Robert Burnham, in his Celestial Handbook, has an interesting
        drawing that suggests just how unique it is. I look forward to many future
        nights at Tuckahoe.

        David Corum
        Wheaton, Maryland


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "jrtf" <jrtf@...>
        To: <delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Friday, May 02, 2003 10:04 PM
        Subject: Re: [delmarvastargazers] Sunday April 27th Observation Notes


        > Tuckahoe last Sunday night was indeed a very pleasant evening. The sky
        > was quite dark and without clouds. Significant dew was at the rendez-vous
        > but did not prevent observations.
        > Besides looking at a few Messiers, I was most impressed by two
        objects.
        > The first one, pointed to us by Dave and referred to by Ralph, was
        > Caldwell 25
        > (NGC 2419), an intergalactic cluster, going by the name of the
        > Intergalactic Tramp" given
        > to it by Shapley in 1944 and also by the name of the "Intergalactic
        > Wanderer".
        > It is a quite far cluster 275,000 light years away, way outside of our
        > galaxy but is
        > estimated to be gravity bound to our galaxy (and not really wandering
        about
        > unbounded as thought at the time the name wanderer was given). Stars could
        > not be distinguished in my 18" Obsession.
        > The second object was Caldwell 35 (NGC 4889), an elliptical galaxy in
        > Coma Berenices, mag 11.5. It was a dim sight in the 18" and
        > for good reason: the distance is 300 million light years, approximately
        > 2% of
        > the current estimate of the dimension of the universe. That was the
        > farthest
        > object I had ever looked at in a telescope.
        > These two images stayed with me for a few days.
        > The company (Ralph, Tim, Tom and Dave) was wonderful. It was a very
        > delightful small scale star party.
        > Jean-Paul Richard
        >
        >
        >
        >
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