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"Paraliterature"

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  • David Cozy
    ... PARALITERATURE, the category of written works relegated to the margins of recognized literature and often dismissed as subliterary despite evident
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 14 8:10 PM
      Eli Bishop writes:

      >On a tangent: I never saw the term "para-literary" before I subscribed to
      >this
      >list. I gather it includes SF and maybe other disreputable things that are
      >more commonly called genres. Where did the term come from, and can someone
      >define it more clearly?

      PARALITERATURE, the category of written works relegated to the margins
      of recognized literature and often dismissed as subliterary despite
      evident resemblances to the respectable literature of the official
      canon. Paraliterature thus includes many modern forms of popular
      fiction and drama: children's adventure stories, most detective and spy
      thrillers, most science fiction and fantasy writing, pornography and
      women's romances, along with much television and radio drama.

      (From _The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms_ [1990] by Chris
      Baldick)

      Yours,

      David Cozy
      mailto:cozy@...-net.ne.jp
    • Eli Bishop
      ... Thanks. Hmm... so which SF and fantasy does Oxford consider to make the grade? And what about men s romances? -- Eli Bishop /
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 15 3:02 PM
        David Cozy wrote:

        > PARALITERATURE, the category of written works relegated to the margins
        > of recognized literature and often dismissed as subliterary despite
        > evident resemblances to the respectable literature of the official
        > canon. Paraliterature thus includes many modern forms of popular
        > fiction and drama: children's adventure stories, most detective and spy
        > thrillers, most science fiction and fantasy writing, pornography and
        > women's romances, along with much television and radio drama.
        >
        > (From _The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms_ [1990] by Chris
        > Baldick)

        Thanks. Hmm... so which SF and fantasy does Oxford consider to make the grade?
        And what about men's romances?

        --
        Eli Bishop / http://www.concentric.net/~Elib
        "I been tryin' to put a chicken in the window,
        to chase away the wolf from the door" - John Prine
      • David Cozy
        ... Well, since you asked . . . From their definition of science fiction: Once uniformly dismissed as pulp trash, SF gained greater respect during the 1950s,
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 16 5:18 PM
          Eli Bishop wonders:

          >Hmm... so which SF and fantasy does Oxford consider to make the grade?

          Well, since you asked . . .

          From their definition of "science fiction:"

          Once uniformly dismissed as pulp trash, SF gained greater respect
          during
          the 1950s, as writers like Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, and Arthur C.
          Clarke expanded its range. SF has also had an important influence on
          postmodernist fiction by writers not devoted to this genre alone:
          Thomas
          Pynchon, Kurt Vonnegut, Doris Lessing, and Italo Calvino are
          significant
          examples.

          Yours,


          David Cozy
          mailto:cozy@...-net.ne.jp
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