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Re: [delany-list] Re: Reading Phallos

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  • sknhdjohn@aol.com
    ... I took it as a pisstake on Lacan, in contrast to the Mad Man which involved taking piss.
    Message 1 of 20 , Jun 22, 2006
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      In a message dated 6/22/06 12:48:54, bllsln@... writes:

      >*Phallos* leans largely on Lacan

      I took it as a pisstake on Lacan, in contrast to the Mad Man which involved
      taking piss.
    • pete lenz
      I will take a look at the 1/3 of Phallos and try and come up with some questions of my own. I m excited to get a reading of Phallos started. Best, -Pete ... Do
      Message 2 of 20 , Jul 4, 2006
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        I will take a look at the 1/3 of Phallos and try and come up with some questions of my own. I'm excited to get a reading of Phallos started.

        Best,

        -Pete


        ---------------------------------
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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • bllsln
        Bill here again, back from Maryland. My apologies to those who were waiting for me on the 10th. At the risk of a little overkill, I thought I d get together
        Message 3 of 20 , Jul 12, 2006
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          Bill here again, back from Maryland. My apologies to those who were
          waiting for me on the 10th. At the risk of a little overkill, I
          thought I'd get together some links for those who were still
          interested in the Phallos Group Read. Bellow are all names referred to
          in the first four pages of Delany's novella. No one is obliged to
          follow all the links I provide or to read everything, but even looking
          at a few of them at random should be interesting. Okay, here goes.


          Walter Pater: A gay critic of the late 19th's century. He was a great
          influence on all the modernists, including Joyce and Woolf. In About
          Writing Delany cites him repeatedly as a critic important for writers
          even today. The link below will lead you to Edmond Gosse's
          appreciation of Pater, written on his death.)

          <http://www.pseudopodium.org/repress/gosse/walter-pater-a-portrait.html>

          Lionel Pigot Johnson (1867–02) was a poet, a member of the Rhymers'
          Club, a critic, and religious thinker. Nearly a midget, Johnson was a
          gay alcoholic, a friend of Pater's and Earnest Dowson. The love of his
          life was the adventurer and soldier of fortune Austin Ferrand, who was
          killed at Ladysmith. A volume of Johnson's selected poems, published
          in 1915, was introduced by a major essay by Ezra Pound. A cherished
          copy of this edition was in the poet Hart Crane's adolescent library.

          Arthur Symons (who, while he was not gay, was deeply sympathetic
          to a number of men and artists who were, including Pater, Johnson,
          and Verlaine. Click on the chronology):

          <http://homepages.nildram.co.uk/~simmers/symons1.htm>

          John Addington Symonds:

          <http://www.infopt.demon.co.uk/symindex.htm>

          Baron Crovo (a.k.a Frederic Rolfe):

          <http://www.studiocleo.com/librarie/rolfe/main.html>

          Marc Blitzstein (1905–63):

          <http://www.glbtq.com/arts/blitzstein_m.html>

          Leonard Bernstein borrowed the tune for "There's a Place for Us . . ."
          from a Blitzstein song that never found its way into one of
          Blitzstein's own actual shows/operas, called "Mr. What's His Name . .
          ."—certainly Blitzstein's best known melody today. He was beaten and
          killed in Martinique by some Portuguese sailors he cruised one night.
          As well as his own shows, Cradle Will Rock, No for an Answer, and
          Regina, he was the arranger for the phenomenally successful production
          of the Brecht/Weill Threepenny Opera in the 1954 production.

          Gregory Battcock (1937–80), writer and art critic, was part of the
          circle around the radical Dutch psychiatrist Dr. Hendrick Rouytenbeek,
          and his young protégé, Richard McConckie, in the early 1960, along
          with film-maker Gregory Markopoulus (Twice a Man, The Illiac Passion),
          a circle with which Delany himself was briefly associated during his
          year at CUNY and just after it. (Personal communication with SRD.)
          Delany several times dined with Battcock at Ruytenbeek's NYCiy home.
          In 1980, Battcock was murdered during a visit to Puerto Rico when he
          picked up a young hustler on the beach and brought him back to his
          hotel room.

          The Bibliotheque Nationale is the national library of France,
          comparable to the Library of the British Museum or the U. S. Library
          of Congress. The Enfer is the nickname for the BN's considerable
          holdings in the genre of pornography, in which, at the beginning of
          the century, the surrealist poet Guillaume Apollinaire was a managing
          librarian. Henry Spencer Ashbee and Jules Gay are 19th century
          biographers, respectively English and French, famous for keeping track
          of the erotica published in and out of their respective languages.

          Now, what do all these figures have in common? They are involved with
          gay rights, gay art, or—in the case of Winkelmann, Blitzstein and
          Battock—they were the victims of moral homophobic oppression.

          I believe this web of associations suggest both the history out of
          wjhich Phallos grows and the audience to which it addressed—an
          audience who might be concerned with such a history. I suspect this
          is really meaningful in terms of where the tale told in Phallos takes us.

          Any comments?

          Best—
          Bill
        • bllsln
          Bill here, once more. Apologies for the occasional mis-typings in my last long message. The one that might actually confuse people: Gay and Ashbee are, of
          Message 4 of 20 , Jul 13, 2006
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            Bill here, once more.
            Apologies for the occasional mis-typings in my last long message. The
            one that might actually confuse people: Gay and Ashbee are, of course,
            19th century "bibliographers," not "biographers." (And their works
            with the fancy titles--*Cetena Liborum Tacandorum* [1885],
            *Bibliographie des ouvrages relatifs a l'Amour* [six vols., 1871-73],
            etc.--are large, annotated bibliographies of pornography.) Sorry,
            folks. If you want more information about any of this, see Steven
            Marcus's book *The Other Victorians* [1964]. Oh, and the production of
            the Marc Blitzstein arrangememnt of *The Threepenny Opera* I referred
            to opened in 1952, not '54. You will find others.
            Too much sun down in Maryland . . .

            Best,
            Bill
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