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Re: [delany-list] Stars/Sand roman a clef

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  • de koninck
    ... = own work as Muels Aralynde and other noms de merde, isn t this Oh, I feel so pathetic that I haven t noticed this anagram before.
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 1, 2004
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      --- Jim <jcomer2001@...> wrote:
      = own work as Muels Aralynde and other noms de merde, isn't this

      Oh, I feel so pathetic that I haven't noticed this anagram before.


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    • Nalo Hopkinson
      ... NH: Hell, I once asked Delany where it had come from, and had to feel pathetic as he explained. Dang. -nalo url: http://www.sff.net/people/nalo/ ng:
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 2, 2004
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        At 12:05 PM 2/1/2004 -0800, you wrote:

        >--- Jim <jcomer2001@...> wrote:
        >= own work as Muels Aralynde and other noms de merde, isn't this
        >
        >Oh, I feel so pathetic that I haven't noticed this anagram before.

        NH: Hell, I once asked Delany where it had come from, and had to feel
        pathetic as he explained. Dang.

        -nalo

        url: http://www.sff.net/people/nalo/
        ng: news://news.sff.net/sff.people.nalo/
        journal: http://www.sff.net/people/nalo/writing/naloblogger.html
        -Collection SKIN FOLK winner of the Sunburst Award for Canadian fiction of
        the fantastic
        -Novel THE SALT ROADS, Warner Books, November 2003
      • rdumain
        I took the occasion to give a scrute to Ms. Hopkinson s blog, and followed a link to the essay: Brown Girl in the Ring and White Witches on TV (and how magic
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 2, 2004
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          I took the occasion to give a scrute to Ms. Hopkinson's blog, and
          followed a link to the essay: "Brown Girl in the Ring and White
          Witches on TV (and how magic is just too racy)" by Ashok Mathur. I
          have not yet read any of Ms. Hopkinson's novels so I will not comment
          on them, but I do have a few words to say about this essay, which is
          both clever and unintelligent in the contemporary English Dept.
          manner.

          (1) The (non)whiteness of Jeannie and Samantha in those '60s sitcoms:
          the author neglects to point out that in reality no one was white
          enough for these squeaky-clean suburbanite sitcoms, which presented
          an ideal which few people were living. That sitcom world was also a
          world without serious problems, divorce, white ethnics even ... i.e.
          everything outside of the ideal suburbanite WASP mythical universe.
          So I suppose in that scenario everything "exotic" is non-white.
          Mathur's observations are clever, but his framework does not go very
          deep. I grew up in a multi-ethnic blue collar Rust Belt city, and
          for me those sitcoms I watched on TV were science fiction--completely
          outside of my frame of reference--and that goes for every black,
          Puerto Rican, Jewish, Irish, German, Italian, Polish kid I ever met.

          (2) Mathur's remarks about the blurbs and characterizations of West
          Indian folklore and the nature of Ms. Hopkinson's fiction--the way it
          is pigeonholed--are interesting; to be sure, something to think
          about. But . . .

          (3) His final assertion that the embrace of grandma's folk traditions
          represents some successful personal integration and ethnic/racial
          assertion is really a piece of contemptible stupidity, a typical
          specimen of postmodern multiculti lit prof bullshit. The liberation
          from superstition and repressive tradition is the very hallmark of
          the modernist perspective, embraced by some black writers, most
          outstandingly Richard Wright, who has never been forgiven for it and
          is continually slandered for it now--only by black intellectuals,
          tellingly. Countering one ignorant mythology with another frees no-
          one. What a shame the sorry lessons of Ishmael Reed's neo-hoodoo
          drivel have not been learned.

          --- In delany-list@yahoogroups.com, Nalo Hopkinson <nalo@w...> wrote:
          > At 12:05 PM 2/1/2004 -0800, you wrote:
          >
          > >--- Jim <jcomer2001@y...> wrote:
          > >= own work as Muels Aralynde and other noms de merde, isn't this
          > >
          > >Oh, I feel so pathetic that I haven't noticed this anagram before.
          >
          > NH: Hell, I once asked Delany where it had come from, and had to
          feel
          > pathetic as he explained. Dang.
          >
          > -nalo
          >
          > url: http://www.sff.net/people/nalo/
          > ng: news://news.sff.net/sff.people.nalo/
          > journal: http://www.sff.net/people/nalo/writing/naloblogger.html
          > -Collection SKIN FOLK winner of the Sunburst Award for Canadian
          fiction of
          > the fantastic
          > -Novel THE SALT ROADS, Warner Books, November 2003
        • Steve M
          ... I haven t gone back to the text, but I remeber on previous readings thinking that one of these books was Voyage Orestes! -- Delany s lost novel.
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 3, 2004
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            At 10:13 PM +0000 1/31/04, Jim wrote:
            >On p 56, he reads a
            >huge, desertlike novel in which a poet is a secondary hero. Isn't
            >this Stars/Sand itself, with Vondramach Okk as the hero?
            >Is the 750,000 word experimental novel on p 47 Dhalgren? Isn't
            >that a fair _description_ of Dhalgren?

            I haven't gone back to the text, but I remeber on previous readings
            thinking that one of these books was "Voyage Orestes!" -- Delany's
            lost novel.
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