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Re: [delany-list] The List is sleeping...

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  • Maurizio Nati
    ... From: Lyshol, Heidi To: Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2003 3:09 PM Subject: SV: [delany-list] The List is
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 4, 2003
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      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Lyshol, Heidi" <heidi.lyshol@...>
      To: <delany-list@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2003 3:09 PM
      Subject: SV: [delany-list] The List is sleeping...


      > Maurizio, I was in Milano a couple of weeks ago - my first visit to Italy.
      I thought of you when passing libraries...

      Well, I'm about 700 km southeast from Milano. Marches region.
      I hope you enjoyed your Italian trip.

      bye and thanks

      Maurizio Nati
    • Dan'l Danehy-Oakes
      I see Heidi has already responded but I think I will respond first so I can see whether we go in totally different directions on any of these... ... According
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 4, 2003
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        I see Heidi has already responded but I think I will respond first so
        I can see whether we go in totally different directions on any of these...


        >p. 328
        >Just before taking the bus, Kid is thinking about himself.
        >"He wished he had his notebook: but before the feeling, as he listened, no
        >word rose to begin the complex fixing".
        >I'd like to know how you interpret the term "fixing".

        According to my favorite online English dictionary (www.m-w.com),
        the first and so, presumably, primary sense of "to fix" is not to
        repair, but:

        1 a : to make firm, stable, or stationary
        b : to give a permanent or final form to: as
        (1) : to change into a stable compound or available form
        <bacteria that fix nitrogen>
        (2) : to kill, harden, and preserve for microscopic study
        (3) : to make the image of (a photographic film) permanent by
        removing unused salts

        Delany is using "fix" in a way analogous with this -- Kidd "fixes"
        the memory of a sight or event by putting it into a "fixed" verbal
        form, i.e., a poem. For further on this, see "The Tale of Old Venn"
        in _Tales of Neveryon_, where the titular character describes the
        way in which making a story of an event transforms the event.


        >p. 334 Kid is on the verge of entering the Emboriky's. He's thinking of
        >Lanya and
        >wonders what he really wants.
        >"I want to be among the people. (Where would she have gone?) It is
        >difficult, because it grosses so little, to consider that I dont' want to
        >be
        >with her".
        >The doubt is about "grosses". What does it exactly mean?

        Well, as a verb "to gross" means to earn or bring in, e.g., revenues.
        I'm honestly not sure how that is relevant here.

        (There is also a slang verb meaning, "to disgust" as in "gross me
        out!", but I reasonably certain Delany doesn _not_ intend this
        meaning here.)

        >p. 393
        >I find here "and her hand on his penis became maddening as feathers". Is
        >"maddening as feathers" a colloquial expression?

        Not that I've ever heard of; I think it's just a simile -- with
        the implication "maddening as feathers [on his penis would be]",
        i.e., a light touch that stimulates but doesn't complete the
        stimulation.


        >p. 445
        >Kid is offered a plate with "corn, peas okra". What is okra?

        A vegetable commonly used in Southern American cooking, especially
        Cajun cooking. You can see a picture of okra at
        http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/veggies/okra1.html


        >p. 451
        >Kamp speaking. At the end of his speech: "Everyone laughed. Kid thought: Is
        >he for real?"
        >Now, is Kid meaning: "Is Kamp speaking seriously?" Or what?

        Well, a bit more than that -- he's wondering if Kamp is doing a
        whole put-on act, if he's really the way he's appearing to be or
        if he's putting on a big front.


        >p. 477
        >Kid is looking at a cactus in Harrison's house. He notices that from the
        >plant "hung what looked like a pink tissue. Two steps nearer, and Kid saw
        >it was the rag of a flower".
        >The "rag" of a flower is the petal of a flower, maybe ragged?

        The whole flower has become ragged, worn, etc.

        --Dan'l

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      • Joseph Zitt
        ... From: Maurizio Nati To: Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2003 5:46 AM Subject: [delany-list] The List is
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 4, 2003
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          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Maurizio Nati" <bibnaz@...>
          To: <delany-list@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2003 5:46 AM
          Subject: [delany-list] The List is sleeping...

          > p. 328
          > Just before taking the bus, Kid is thinking about himself.
          > "He wished he had his notebook: but before the feeling, as he listened, no
          > word rose to begin the complex fixing".
          > I'd like to know how you interpret the term "fixing".

          I read it as the connection of the feeling to a an appropriate word. It's as
          in "fixing a picture to a wall", possibly derived from "affix".
        • Manuel Cabrera
          ... Couldn t the word fix also here be used with undertones of a drug fix: .e. a preventing/deferring by inducing drug intoxication? [Non-text portions of
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 4, 2003
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            Ron Henry wrote:

            > Around 14:46:52 +0100, 4 Mar 2003, "Maurizio Nati" <bibnaz@...>
            > wrote,
            >
            > >... so it's time to wake it.
            > >Here's some questions.
            > >
            > >p. 328
            > >Just before taking the bus, Kid is thinking about himself.
            > >"He wished he had his notebook: but before the feeling, as he
            > listened, no
            > >word rose to begin the complex fixing".
            > >I'd like to know how you interpret the term "fixing".

            Couldn't the word "fix" also here be used with undertones of a drug fix:
            .e. a preventing/deferring by inducing drug intoxication?


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Ron Henry
            Around 14:46:52 +0100, 4 Mar 2003, Maurizio Nati wrote, ... In this context to fix means (denotatively) something related to affix --
            Message 5 of 7 , Mar 5, 2003
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              Around 14:46:52 +0100, 4 Mar 2003, "Maurizio Nati" <bibnaz@...> wrote,

              >... so it's time to wake it.
              >Here's some questions.
              >
              >p. 328
              >Just before taking the bus, Kid is thinking about himself.
              >"He wished he had his notebook: but before the feeling, as he listened, no
              >word rose to begin the complex fixing".
              >I'd like to know how you interpret the term "fixing".

              In this context "to fix" means (denotatively) something related to "affix"
              -- the writing would "fix" words in thought and on paper. Make them
              permanent. But the overtone in the English is nice because you have the
              echo of the meaning of "fix" which means to repair, which gives a sense
              that he is attempting to repair his life, or at least his disordered
              perception, with writing.

              >p. 334
              >Kid is on the verge of entering the Emboriky's. He's thinking of Lanya and
              >wonders what he really wants.
              >"I want to be among the people. (Where would she have gone?) It is
              >difficult, because it grosses so little, to consider that I dont' want to be
              >with her".
              >The doubt is about "grosses". What does it exactly mean?

              Something similar to "accumulates" or "earns" ("adds up to"). A "gross" in
              English is a count of 144 of something, and to "gross" means to accumulate
              somewhat large quantities of something generally (though not literally a
              count of 144 of course). Similarly in American English you can refer to the
              total amount you earn at your job (before taxes) as being "what you gross".

              >p. 393
              >I find here "and her hand on his penis became maddening as feathers". Is
              >"maddening as feathers" a colloquial expression?

              Not a common colloquial expression or idiom. Just means that it
              tickles/teases in an intensely sexually stimulating way.

              >p. 445
              >Kid is offered a plate with "corn, peas okra". What is okra?

              A vegetable, once only found in Southern cooking (in "soul food", or in
              "cajun/creole" cooking) in the US (I think it might also be found in
              African cooking), but now in the age of frozen food okra is more
              widespread. It's kind of a long green pod with ridges running lengthwise,
              and looks a bit like small Chinese lotus when sliced crosswise into short
              segments.

              A lot of people find the taste unpleasant -- gummy and slimy, especially
              when it's not prepared very well (that is, simply boiled after having been
              frozen or, ugh, canned; it's best when freshly sauteed or fried). It's also
              used widely to thicken stews and gumbo dishes -- because what seems slimy
              in some instances also makes sauces and stews thick and rich in other
              instances.

              >p. 451
              >Kamp speaking. At the end of his speech: "Everyone laughed. Kid thought: Is
              >he for real?"
              >Now, is Kid meaning: "Is Kamp speaking seriously?" Or what?

              Sort of, but more along the lines of "Is he full of shit?" (deluding or
              self-deluded) or "Is he putting on an act?"

              >p. 477
              >Kid is looking at a cactus in Harrison's house. He notices that from the
              >plant "hung what looked like a pink tissue. Two steps nearer, and Kid saw
              >it was the rag of a flower".
              >The "rag" of a flower is the petal of a flower, maybe ragged?

              Not necessarily ragged (though there is a suggestion of that by
              association). Just that a tattered flower looks like a scrap of colored
              cloth rag hung on the cactus. There is also the sense here ("two steps
              nearer") of the surprise one gets the first time one sees a
              beautifully-colored flower blooming on a thorny, forbidding-looking cactus
              plant. (You know what cacti are, right?) Another aspect probably to
              consider is that many cacti are suggestively very phallic in shape, while
              covered with dangerous-looking thorns -- you can really get injured by the
              spines and thorns on a cactus -- yet here is one with a spot of beauty, a
              badge of beauty, affixed to it. Associate this with Harrison, the Black
              ghetto mythic hero accused rapist.

              Thanks for rousing us--
              Ron
            • p1d1s1
              ... Just a thought, I ve always believed that this phrase was indicative of the author waiting for his muse--waiting for the word to arise that would lead to
              Message 6 of 7 , Mar 12, 2003
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                --- In delany-list@yahoogroups.com, Manuel Cabrera <semiote@e...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > Ron Henry wrote:
                >
                > > Around 14:46:52 +0100, 4 Mar 2003, "Maurizio Nati" <bibnaz@u...>
                > > wrote,
                > >
                > > >... so it's time to wake it.
                > > >Here's some questions.
                > > >
                > > >p. 328
                > > >Just before taking the bus, Kid is thinking about himself.
                > > >"He wished he had his notebook: but before the feeling, as he
                > > listened, no
                > > >word rose to begin the complex fixing".
                > > >I'd like to know how you interpret the term "fixing".
                >
                > Couldn't the word "fix" also here be used with undertones of a drug fix:
                > .e. a preventing/deferring by inducing drug intoxication?
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                Just a thought,

                I've always believed that this phrase was indicative of the author waiting for his muse--waiting for the word to arise that would lead to his writing down the current "fix" on the situation, which would be complex due to the perceptual shifts inherent in either Kidd, Bellona or both.
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