Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
Advanced Search
Author
Subject
Message
Special notice only

37 results from messages in decentralization

Advanced Search
  • I feel safe in predicting that pretty much everything with a retail price over $25 will be connected to the internet some day soon. Here's one I'm finding quite interesting right now. http://wiki.slimdevices.com/index.cgi?JiveUI On Nov 9, 2007 10:59 AM, Lucas Gonze wrote: > > So what's out there which is hooked up to the internet but is not a > formal communications device like a...
    Hugh Pyle Nov 9, 2007
  • Lucas, > The more reliable each forwarder is, the fewer forwarders are needed. The Groove (V1) approach, as you probably know, is to have a smallish number of very reliable forwarders (the hosted relay services, which double-up as presence servers) at well-known addresses. Enterprise-hosted relay servers will begin to make that more distributed as they start to appear (over the...
    Hugh Pyle Jan 9, 2002
  • Very interesting. One comment - What measures are in place to secure the system against spoofing (eg. of the "replica" or "proxy" function)? Although you discuss security in the paper, a major attack point not discussed would be to trick the controller into believing that your target is offline or firewalled and that you are their proxy. > uServ is a project at IBM which exploits...
    Hugh Pyle Dec 3, 2001
  • Fetching Sponsored Content...
  • > I don't think corporations like having content strewn out across all of their user's PCs Groove's central services don't manage content. The content is at the edges, where people need it. The relay and the "bot server" manage connectivity. Of course there's usually plenty of connectivity at the edges (peer, to peer). Unless you have a firewall between the users. In which case...
    Hugh Pyle Nov 1, 2001
  • > Two, the parable of the blind men and the elephant doesn't map well to > situations like this, because elephants are real and have an existence > independant of any description of them, while memes do not. Surely the *parable of the blind men and the elephant* doesn't have an existence independent of any description of it... (...or does it?) Been watching too much Schrage today...
    Hugh Pyle Oct 23, 2001
  • Ross Lee Graham wrote, > The technology we associate with the term Peer-to-Peer introduces methods for > rendering end-users independent of the infrastructure on which end-users can > ride. Yes, P2P will only be successful to the extent it can work with the environment, and right now the environment is pretty unforgiving. My perspectives on this at http://www.cabezal.com/ppt...
    Hugh Pyle Oct 12, 2001
  • Todd Boyle wrote, > IF there is any argument in favor of privacy I have never heard it. There's been little need to argue for privacy: for untold millennia the default has been that private conversations between individuals remain so. If you want to guarantee privacy, just take a walk into the forest. "Stick 'em up, Johnny, we have you surrounded" De-facto privacy is difficult...
    Hugh Pyle Sep 24, 2001
  • (Whose national interest, btw?) On the contrary; decentralised technologies are more robust in the face of disruption, and a time of war represent a definite increase in disruption of various sorts. I'm plugging full speed ahead. Time of war may also mean that the only people spending any money are government agencies. Whether that's a benefit or a hindrance depends on your ethics...
    Hugh Pyle Sep 22, 2001
  • Clay Shirky's 30000-sound-cards comment appears again (http://www.openp2p.com/pub/a/p2p/2001/08/20/shirky.html?page=3) Someone out there right now is working on an application that needs 30,000 sound cards to run. I don't know what that application is, but I'm going to be awfully interested when it launches. and reminds me - my home PC is reasonably chunky, but the one massively...
    Hugh Pyle Aug 21, 2001
  • > Since the function call is the minimum condition for programming ,... Back in the day when I knew what a register was and how many there were in an 8088, you tried to do as much as possible on the chip. "Real" memory was a long bus-ride away. Memory accesses were through a slow, simple set of verbs. Function calls to a far pointer would take, oh, sixty-odd clock cycles just to...
    Hugh Pyle Aug 14, 2001