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Re: [decentralization] The decline of P2P and Decentralisation

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  • Mitra
    Thanks Julian for reminding me this group still exists. I think Decentralisation was great - in theory - in practice most of the apps were unreliable, and so
    Message 1 of 43 , Apr 24, 2007
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      Thanks Julian for reminding me this group still exists.
       
      I think Decentralisation was great - in theory - in practice most of the apps were unreliable, and so were only picked up by enthusiasts, or by those trying to hide something (file-sharing etc). The ones that worked well (Skype etc) were mostly based on server mediated P2P. I can't think of a pure P2P play that worked well enough to be picked up by regular consumers.

      I think part of it was the "religious zeal" of many of the P2P proponents, purety of the model became more important than delivering working applications.

      Another - not unrelated issue, was that many of the P2P companies (including Flycode where I was CTO) were looking for their second round just about at the time of the dot-bomb.

      Looking at Julian's notes ....

      RSS is still strong,  replacing the web in many ways.
      Wordpress and MT didn't offer the ease of creation of sites that Myspace and Facebook did.

      Similarly YouTube allowed people to easily publish content and have it easily , and reliably accessable to whoever gets the link, - show me a P2P system that does that.

      IRC became Skype (not Twitter)- arguably more decentralised than IRC.

      I've seen several people  - includingly stunningly competent sysadmins try - and fail - to get Jabber servers to work properly with Jabber clients.

      - Mitra Ardron
      (ex Flycode, Pandora, Worlds Inc, GreenNet, APC etc)

      On Mon, 23 Apr 2007, Julian Bond wrote:
      > Whatever happened to P2P and Decentralisation as a design pattern?
      >
      > Wordpress and Movable type became Myspace and Facebook.
      >
      > RSS became Google Reader
      >
      > Distributed email servers and desktop clients have become Google Mail
      >
      > Posting a Quicktime file on your site has become YouTube
      >
      > Running your own shoutcast server has become Last.FM tag radio
      >
      > IRC has become Twitter
      >
      > This post was prompted by Twitter and Twitter's success. If you were
      > going to design this from scratch knowing what they know now, would you
      > really use a pull architecture, centralised web system and Ruby on
      > Rails?
      >
      > Did we all forget about Decentralisation or has the pendulum just swung
      > out to the opposite end and is due to swing back any time now?
      >
      > ps. I know those questions are strawmen and the truth is that (almost)
      > everything that has ever happened is still happening.



      --
      -----
      Mitra Ardron
      mitra@...
      www.mitra.biz/blog
      www.naturalinnovation.org
      www.zelfoaustralia.com
    • Andrew de Andrade
      The two places where we can promote P2P as a design pattern right now is in the WHAT-WG of the W3C and the IETF. The WHAT-WG is the working group responsible
      Message 43 of 43 , Jan 25, 2010
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        The two places where we can promote P2P as a design pattern right now
        is in the WHAT-WG of the W3C and the IETF. The WHAT-WG is the working
        group responsible for defining the HTML5 standard.

        Just last week I posted the following idea to the group's list and I'm
        trying to recruit people that can help us explore this idea:

        http://lists.whatwg.org/htdig.cgi/whatwg-whatwg.org/2010-January/024772.html

        Keep in mind that for some reason my mail-agent and my friend's mail
        agent broke the thread and it is separated into more than one thread
        at the moment.

        Gleicon has a few ideas for implementing this and I've gotten some
        tips from others like Todd over at HighScalability.

        If anyone on this list wants to participate or can indicate others to
        participate, that would be awesome. Right now I'm trying to call the
        attention of those with the technical knowledge necessary to take this
        forward. I'm a product manager with the skills to help organize this
        idea, but I don't know enough to make this happen alone.

        regards,

        Andrew
        @andrewdeandrade
        andrew at deandrade dot com dot br
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