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Re: an algorithm for discovering blogversations

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  • Francis Hwang
    ... This is close to one of the problems I have with all the various ways of aggregating and searching online conversations: They re really blog-centric. When
    Message 1 of 4 , May 24, 2004
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      Lucas wrote:

      > Another difference is that, on a dreamy not quite right level, I'm
      > hoping
      > to scoop up the malingerers as well as people who get directly
      > involved.
      > It should be possible to map the whole conversation without having
      > every
      > participant formally announce that they're involved.

      This is close to one of the problems I have with all the various ways
      of aggregating and searching online conversations: They're really
      blog-centric. When I look at referer logs for my own site I see lots of
      interesting content that couldn't really be considered a blog: They've
      got no RSS, maybe you're dealing with a monthly zine with big articles
      instead of twenty snippets a day. A few of my articles on my site are
      getting used in class curricula, which somehow seems as interesting a
      point of conversation as that of a blogger's referring to your page.

      The problem with defining new protocols, though, is that implementation
      of anything non-trivial is expensive (compared to the very low cost, in
      terms of time, that it takes to write online content of any sort).
      Perhaps even collecting a TopicExchange-type URL might be a lot of
      work. It's also just not so much fun, which is always a problem.
      Personally I'm starting to think that there's a lot more to be gleaned
      out of what we've already got.

      One big item on my techie to-do list is to analyze referer logs to
      figure out who's posting references to various pages on my site. I
      could imagine a tool that I use once a week or so, to approve or delete
      for spam. (Personally I'm not really hot on the 10-posts-a-day blogging
      model: I don't have the time.) It would be basically like Trackbacks,
      only it would suck in everything else, too: wikis, class curricula,
      online magazines, etc. Heck, anything that can be done to shake up the
      bloggers echo chamber is healthy.

      Francis Hwang
      http://fhwang.net/
      AIM: francisrhizome
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