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decentralization the solution to Internet radio

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  • John Buckman <john@lyris.com>
    I m launching an artist-oriented Internet record label at http://www.magnatune.com. The goal of the site is to sign bands and promote their music through the
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 27, 2003
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      I'm launching an artist-oriented Internet record label at http://www.magnatune.com The goal of the site is to sign bands and promote their music through the free exchange of Mp3s and (especially) Mp3 radio. Basically, the idea is like spinner.com, but with a 50/50 split of the sale price of the music (sold at $5) to the artist, and we only play artists on our label. There's a lot more philosophy behind the idea, that you can read at www.magnatune.com

      I think a lot of people would want to listen to genre-specific MP3 radio stations of the Magnatune artists, but the problem is bandwidth costs. 10 mbits will support about 100 128k radio listeners, and that's not a lot, and that's pricey.

      So... I'm thinking about using p2p technology (i.e. decentralization). Specifically, clicking on (say) "Trance Radio" at www.magnatune.com would give you a playlist file with 24h worth of random programming of Magnatune's Trance artists. The MP3s on the playlist would be downloaded via something like Gnutella - with www.magnatune.com always having all the files, but if a peer (ie, another radio listener) has the Mp3s, they could be downloaded from there instead. Note that this is *not* a single stream of a single mp3, but rather a playlist of individual mp3s.

      In this way, the site should be able to support an unlimited number of Mp3 radio listeners. Also key, is that people would be building up an Mp3 collection as they listened to the radio, and could easily replay any songs they liked (or skip those they didn't). All this is possible *only* because we're signing artists to our own record label -- all other labels would prohibit this kind of sharing. My initial focus is on music genres that are not well represented by radio (ie, most Electronic music genres, Heavy Metal, Early Classical, World music, New Age)

      I believe that this is a rarely-discussed use of p2p technology (and a possible new business model for the music industry). I looked into other decentralization approaches (such Akamai and Speedera) but they were awfully expensive, and don't take advantage of the automatic "peer group" that is created by a radio station.

      I don't have any specific questions, other than the fact that I'm looking into ways to make this happen and other ideas on this topic.

      -john
    • Justin Chapweske
      I would suggest looking into Brandon Wiley s Alluvium application at (http://www.decentralize.org/) which is built on top of our release of Tornado Cache
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 27, 2003
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        I would suggest looking into Brandon Wiley's Alluvium application at
        (http://www.decentralize.org/) which is built on top of our release of
        Tornado Cache (http://onionnetworks.com/products_tornado.php) for the
        Open Content Network (http://open-content.net/).

        You could also look at overlay multicast systems such as that from
        AllCast, Blue Falcon, or Chaincast, but I believe that the Alluvium
        approach has many advantages over these systems.

        Thanks,

        -Justin

        John Buckman wrote:
        > I'm launching an artist-oriented Internet record label at http://www.magnatune.com The goal of the site is to sign bands and promote their music through the free exchange of Mp3s and (especially) Mp3 radio. Basically, the idea is like spinner.com, but with a 50/50 split of the sale price of the music (sold at $5) to the artist, and we only play artists on our label. There's a lot more philosophy behind the idea, that you can read at www.magnatune.com
        >
        > I think a lot of people would want to listen to genre-specific MP3 radio stations of the Magnatune artists, but the problem is bandwidth costs. 10 mbits will support about 100 128k radio listeners, and that's not a lot, and that's pricey.
        >
        > So... I'm thinking about using p2p technology (i.e. decentralization). Specifically, clicking on (say) "Trance Radio" at www.magnatune.com would give you a playlist file with 24h worth of random programming of Magnatune's Trance artists. The MP3s on the playlist would be downloaded via something like Gnutella - with www.magnatune.com always having all the files, but if a peer (ie, another radio listener) has the Mp3s, they could be downloaded from there instead. Note that this is *not* a single stream of a single mp3, but rather a playlist of individual mp3s.
        >
        > In this way, the site should be able to support an unlimited number of Mp3 radio listeners. Also key, is that people would be building up an Mp3 collection as they listened to the radio, and could easily replay any songs they liked (or skip those they didn't). All this is possible *only* because we're signing artists to our own record label -- all other labels would prohibit this kind of sharing. My initial focus is on music genres that are not well represented by radio (ie, most Electronic music genres, Heavy Metal, Early Classical, World music, New Age)
        >
        > I believe that this is a rarely-discussed use of p2p technology (and a possible new business model for the music industry). I looked into other decentralization approaches (such Akamai and Speedera) but they were awfully expensive, and don't take advantage of the automatic "peer group" that is created by a radio station.
        >
        > I don't have any specific questions, other than the fact that I'm looking into ways to make this happen and other ideas on this topic.
        >
        > -john
        >
        >
        >
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        >
        >
        >
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        >


        --
        Justin Chapweske, Onion Networks
        http://onionnetworks.com/
      • cefn.hoile@bt.com
        Not to forget the UK based P2P internet streaming solution...from the maker of Spheres of Chaos! Seeking developers for a grass roots internet radio system.
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 28, 2003
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          Not to forget the UK based P2P internet streaming solution...from the
          maker of Spheres of Chaos! Seeking developers for a grass roots internet
          radio system.

          http://www.chaotica.u-net.com/streamer.htm

          Cefn
          http://www.cefn.com

          -----Original Message-----
          From: John Buckman <john@...> [mailto:john@...]
          Sent: 28 February 2003 05:37
          To: decentralization@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [decentralization] decentralization the solution to Internet
          radio


          I believe that this is a rarely-discussed use of p2p technology (and a
          possible new business model for the music industry). I looked into
          other decentralization approaches (such Akamai and Speedera) but they
          were awfully expensive, and don't take advantage of the automatic "peer
          group" that is created by a radio station.
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