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Re: [p2p-hackers] OceanStore "Pond" prototype source code released

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  • Wes Felter
    ... Until you get the bill and the letter from the RIAA. ... It s a deal. Wes Felter - wesley@felter.org - http://felter.org/wesley/
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 17, 2002
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      on 10/17/02 6:04 PM, Gordon Mohr at gojomo@... wrote:

      > Wes Felter writes:
      >> OceanStore is "a global persistent data store designed to scale to
      >> billions of users. It provides a consistent, highly-available, and
      >> durable storage utility atop an infrastructure comprised of untrusted
      >> servers." It's also another example that P2P != file sharing.
      >>
      >> http://oceanstore.sourceforge.net/pond-sf.html
      >>
      >
      > By simply publicizing the name/keys of the files that you've pushed
      > into the Ocean, so that others may retrieve those files as easily as
      > you, it seems to me that OceanStore would be a very capable platform
      > for file-sharing.

      Until you get the bill and the letter from the RIAA.

      > But I won't tell the enemies of file sharing, if you won't. Shhhh!

      It's a deal.

      Wes Felter - wesley@... - http://felter.org/wesley/
    • Gordon Mohr
      ... Which is different from Napster, Gnutella, FastTrack -- how? Also from the OceanStore overview: # We must assume that any server in the infrastructure may
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 17, 2002
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        Wes Felter writes:
        > on 10/17/02 6:04 PM, Gordon Mohr at gojomo@... wrote:
        >
        > > Wes Felter writes:
        > >> OceanStore is "a global persistent data store designed to scale to
        > >> billions of users. It provides a consistent, highly-available, and
        > >> durable storage utility atop an infrastructure comprised of untrusted
        > >> servers." It's also another example that P2P != file sharing.
        > >>
        > >> http://oceanstore.sourceforge.net/pond-sf.html
        > >>
        > >
        > > By simply publicizing the name/keys of the files that you've pushed
        > > into the Ocean, so that others may retrieve those files as easily as
        > > you, it seems to me that OceanStore would be a very capable platform
        > > for file-sharing.
        >
        > Until you get the bill and the letter from the RIAA.

        Which is different from Napster, Gnutella, FastTrack -- how?

        Also from the OceanStore overview:

        # We must assume that any server in the infrastructure may
        # crash, leak information, or become compromised. Promiscuous
        # caching therefore requires redundancy and cryptographic
        # techniques to protect the data from the servers upon which
        # it resides.

        ...and...

        # A version-based archival storage system provides durability
        # which exceeds today's best by orders of magnitude. OceanStore
        # stores each version of a data object in a permanent, read-only
        # form, which is encoded with an erasure code and spread over
        # hundreds or thousands of servers. A small subset of the encoded
        # fragments are sufficient to reconstruct the archived object; only
        # a global-scale disaster could disable enough machines to destroy
        # the archived object.

        A nastygram from any legal entity is not a "global-scale
        disaster"; if OceanStore works as advertised it will outdo
        Freenet in censorship-resistance -- even if local access
        points may be censorable.

        So I would say OceanStore is another example that advanced P2P
        tends to subsume unfettered file-sharing as a trivial application.

        - Gojomo
        ____________________
        Gordon Mohr <gojomo@ . . . At Bitzi, people cooperate to identify, rate,
        bitzi.com> Bitzi CTO . . . describe and discover files of every kind.
        _ http://bitzi.com _ . . . Bitzi knows bits -- because you teach it!
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