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Re: p2p working group/standards

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  • allenjs@hotmail.com
    ... Like Lucas said, service discovery (or directory?) is a big one that various P2P systems could benefit by sharing. Another is a global public key
    Message 1 of 55 , Feb 12, 2001
      > 1) What is needed (or wanted) by most p2p developers that
      > would actually be worth standardizing?

      Like Lucas said, service discovery (or directory?) is a big one that
      various P2P systems could benefit by sharing. Another is a global
      public key "identity" directory (sort of like a big LDAP); with
      appropriate use of PK could guarantee anonymity where desired and
      could also guarantee identity if desired. Both of these things BTW
      are useful for a service-based web like .NET, Sun's ONE, and whatever
      Oracle calls theirs are talking about.

      > 2) Are there any "plumbing" or mundane tasks, that every app
      > could benefit from?
      > 3) are there any other things aspects in or surrounding p2p that
      > should be standardized, interoperable or compatible?

      The rest is gonna be hard. We are talking about consumers here.
      Consumers happily go out and buy a Sony Digital Camcorder without
      caring that the video capture board they used for their Panasonic
      camcorder won't work, since the two companies implemented
      differently. Businesses respond to FUD about standards ("You mean,
      if I use XML without waiting for ebXML then my business might
      spontaneously combust? I'm going to go pressure Microsoft to support
      ebXML right now!!") Consumers might grumble, but they just want a
      cool product. That's one conclusion I reached about Groove - it's a
      very consumer-friendly interface. It's simple. And for developers,
      they have a cool API that can be programmed from any programming
      language, so why would someone care about the underlying protocols?
      The only people that will want interop are the P2P vendors who don't
      have large communities yet, so it will be the small vendors with
      little power pushing the big vendors to be gracious (and when I
      say "big", I mean in terms of user community -- Napster is "big", and
      Groove's eye candy will be a very powerful force to beat I think).
      So any standards would rely on the magnanimous nature of the dominant
      players. This is just the nature of the consumer market; users don't
      buy standards, they buy cool features. Standards aren't bad for the
      consumer market, in fact it is a noble goal -- but I notice that at
      least four of the really hot P2P platforms today (Groove, OpenCola,
      Napster, XDegrees) all invented totally different approaches to
      solving their problems, including different approaches to directory
      and discovery -- which nearly everyone would agree should be
      standard. So judging from that, I'm not hopeful at all. (I am sure
      that the p2pwg will write some specs, and so will other groups, but
      it will be an exercise in futility -- specs are not killer apps, and
      the killer apps are already out of control).
    • Ben Houston
      ... Probably going to SHA-1 isn t too big of a problem. I ll bring it up with those that I know. Interestingly, there are ways to add file hashes within the
      Message 55 of 55 , Feb 20, 2001
        Justin Chapweske said:
        > ... switch to SHA-1.
        >
        > The biggest group that I havn't yet talked to about this is the Gnutella
        > guys, but I'm sure they'd be into it as well. Any Gnutellians on the
        > list?

        Probably going to SHA-1 isn't too big of a problem. I'll bring it up with
        those that I know. Interestingly, there are ways to add file hashes within
        the existing protocol specifications - it should even be backwards
        compatible.

        Cheers,
        -ben houston
        http://www.exocortex.org/~ben
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