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  • rubyhoney97402
    mug, Wow, what a post! LOL. I ll address just a teeny bit from what you ve posted for now... Overall, I am wary of any attempt to impose some sort of societal
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 1, 2002
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      mug,

      Wow, what a post! LOL. I'll address just a teeny bit from what you've posted for now...
      Overall, I am wary of any attempt to impose some sort of societal "shouldness" about how to think/discuss/
      believe/accept the paranormal. Of course, this "shouldness" exists anyway. That's another topic, I'm too tired
      right now to get into layers of culture and institutions etc.

      You did ask, however:
      <<<<Should we explain that when something
      > is lost, a ghost may have stolen/moved it? >>>

      Sure. I have no problem with that, in context. I know of a large family, lots of kids, who live in a haunted
      house. They all know it, talk about it, lots of times the more mischevious of the ghosts does things. It
      depends on your values, belief systems, etc. I don't think there should be a law that says you can, or cannot,
      say these things to your kids. But if one chooses to do so, that's up to them.


      <<<< Should we tell them to pray to angels/saints/prophets/gods when they are scared?>>
      Don't many people do this already? (I remember being told in Catholic school to move over in my desk so my
      guardian angel would have room to sit and rest, I kid you not! And I'm Jewish, don't ask, so you can see why
      that tended to bend my mind a bit.) Don't many families drag their kids off to Sunday schools and all the rest
      of it and it's considered normal?

      later,
      ~ ruby
    • thevirtualgreek
      ... family, lots of kids, who live in a haunted ... mischevious of the ghosts does things. It ... should be a law that says you can, or cannot, ... up to them.
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 2, 2002
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        > Sure. I have no problem with that, in context. I know of a large
        family, lots of kids, who live in a haunted
        > house. They all know it, talk about it, lots of times the more
        mischevious of the ghosts does things. It
        > depends on your values, belief systems, etc. I don't think there
        should be a law that says you can, or cannot,
        > say these things to your kids. But if one chooses to do so, that's
        up to them.

        If they talk about this seriously, then I pity the poor children. The
        only place they'll be able to get a job without being laughed at is
        some haunted pub in England. Poof! goes their analytical abilities.

        ~~ Paul
      • mugnyte
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 2, 2002
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          > mug,> You did ask, however:> <<<<Should we explain that when something > > is lost, a ghost may have stolen/moved it? >>>> Sure. I have no problem with that, in context. I know of a large family, lots of kids, who live in a haunted > house. They all know it, talk about it, lots of times the more mischevious of the ghosts does things. It > depends on your values, belief systems, etc. I don't think there should be a law that says you can, or cannot, > say these things to your kids. But if one chooses to do so, that's up to them.> But what steps do you use to distinguish between searching for where something was moved ( or where your child lost something) and simply conceding that a spirit/ghost/fairy has taken/moved it? Could not your kids arguably chalk everything up to "Not Me", the famous Circus Family ghost?
        • rubyhoney97402
          ... Well you know I obviously disagree with you Paul. Why would it follow that they would t be able to get a job anywhere? Let s see, the father is a CEO big
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 2, 2002
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            --- In debunkingdebunkers@y..., "thevirtualgreek" <yahoo@w...> wrote:
            > > Sure. I have no problem with that, in context. I know of a large
            > family, lots of kids, who live in a haunted
            > > house. They all know it, talk about it, lots of times the more
            > mischevious of the ghosts does things. It
            > > depends on your values, belief systems, etc. I don't think there
            > should be a law that says you can, or cannot,
            > > say these things to your kids. But if one chooses to do so, that's
            > up to them.
            >
            > If they talk about this seriously, then I pity the poor children. The
            > only place they'll be able to get a job without being laughed at is
            > some haunted pub in England. Poof! goes their analytical abilities.
            >
            > ~~ Paul

            Well you know I obviously disagree with you Paul. Why would it follow that they would't be able to get a job
            anywhere? Let's see, the father is a CEO big wig in a huge company, one of the older "kids" obviously no
            longer living there is a cop, there are a few college students, the mother runs her own business in town,
            ...taking it further, the hauntings and UFOs experiences seem to follow the family, as has been mentioned in
            other posts when this has come up, so in one house of one of the adult children, we have a prodcuer,
            husband is a teacher, another relative living in a haunted house is a sheriff, ....yep, too bad none of them can
            find jobs or are "laughed" at all the time. Children are perfectly "normal" and are far from being idiots.

            Now Paul, this is a freindly warning: I'm not engaging in any repeat theater monkey business.

            ~ ruby
          • rubyhoney97402
            Message 5 of 8 , Apr 2, 2002
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              <<But what
              steps do you use to distinguish between
              searching for where something was moved
              ( or where your child lost something) and simply conceding that a
              spirit/ghost/fairy has taken/moved it? Could not your kids arguably chalk
              everything up to "Not Me", the famous Circus Family ghost?>>


              That's assuming one "simply concedes." The parents are quite savvy of how kids are, having a million of them.
              So it rarely happens that a kid will try any nonsense like "the ghost did it." Believe me, that doesn't go very
              far. As I said, you have to take it in context, the history of the family, the history of the haunting activity, the
              types of haunting activity, etc.

              ~ ruby
            • thevirtualgreek
              ... follow that they would t be able to get a job ... one of the older kids obviously no ... mother runs her own business in town, ... follow the family, as
              Message 6 of 8 , Apr 2, 2002
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                > Well you know I obviously disagree with you Paul. Why would it
                follow that they would't be able to get a job
                > anywhere? Let's see, the father is a CEO big wig in a huge company,
                one of the older "kids" obviously no
                > longer living there is a cop, there are a few college students, the
                mother runs her own business in town,
                > ...taking it further, the hauntings and UFOs experiences seem to
                follow the family, as has been mentioned in
                > other posts when this has come up, so in one house of one of the
                adult children, we have a prodcuer,
                > husband is a teacher, another relative living in a haunted house is
                a sheriff, ....yep, too bad none of them can
                > find jobs or are "laughed" at all the time. Children are
                perfectly "normal" and are far from being idiots.

                Sorry, the job comment was just a joke. I know lots of people with
                real jobs who believe in ghosts. I didn't suggest the kids are
                idiots, but I question everyone's analytical skills.

                How have they eliminated the possibility that one of the kids is a
                prankster or emotionally troubled?

                ~~ Paul
              • mugnyte
                Message 7 of 8 , Apr 2, 2002
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                  --- In debunkingdebunkers@y..., rubyhoney97402 <no_reply@y...> wrote:> That's assuming one "simply concedes." The parents are quite savvy of how kids are, having a million of them. > So it rarely happens that a kid will try any nonsense like "the ghost did it." Believe me, that doesn't go very > far. As I said, you have to take it in context, the history of the family, the history of the haunting activity, the > types of haunting activity, etc.> > ~ rubyEveryone has a First Child. Nobody is born with a baby raising book above instincts. If the child continues to protest, where do you put your foot down?So this being your condition to determine if a ghost is real or not, how does a person adapt to a stranger stating the same? Must every person who wishes to believe we went to the moon actually go examine the footprints? We cannot trudge every doubter to each and every haunted house. There must be an understandable method for showing people: "here! this is a ghost and how we came to believe it." Video tape certainly isn't the way, since people have seen hours of ghosts on TV and anything can be faked.Without concrete measures, we seem to never have definitive answers in the field. Without definitive answers, the paranormal will always be destined to the cutting room floor of sciences. Sadly, there seems to be no objective way to show anything exists in the field.mug
                • zen_witch
                  Paul, that is lame. I don t laugh at people who think they have a ghost in their house. In fact, you can ask around and I bet 90% of the population will say
                  Message 8 of 8 , Apr 2, 2002
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                    Paul, that is lame. I don't laugh at people who think they have a ghost in their
                    house. In fact, you can ask around and I bet 90% of the population will say
                    they believe in the possibility of ghosts being real. So I guess the only place
                    they would have to fear talking about it and being ridiculed is some job with a
                    boss like you or crap-ton midnight.
                    ~ zw ~

                    -- In debunkingdebunkers@y..., "thevirtualgreek" <yahoo@w...> wrote:
                    > > Sure. I have no problem with that, in context. I know of a large
                    > family, lots of kids, who live in a haunted
                    > > house. They all know it, talk about it, lots of times the more
                    > mischevious of the ghosts does things. It
                    > > depends on your values, belief systems, etc. I don't think there
                    > should be a law that says you can, or cannot,
                    > > say these things to your kids. But if one chooses to do so, that's
                    > up to them.
                    >
                    > If they talk about this seriously, then I pity the poor children. The
                    > only place they'll be able to get a job without being laughed at is
                    > some haunted pub in England. Poof! goes their analytical abilities.
                    >
                    > ~~ Paul
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