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Re: Athiesm versus theism; practicality of argument.

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  • proleus
    ... centers where people could just hang out or have organized activities. Sounds like a plan :) The problem arises with keeping out god mongers. As much as
    Message 1 of 40 , Oct 10, 2002
      > I too, have thought about some sort of center, like senior citizen
      centers where people could just hang out or have organized activities.

      Sounds like a plan :)

      The problem arises with keeping out god mongers.

      As much as they would apeal it, by protesting or whatnot, we could
      just do the same to them when they go to church.

      It would have to be a private club and even then someone would sue
      for entry just to preach.

      Not really, it should be an open place where people can speak their
      minds. Just make it so that thiests don't get their time on the air
      (do athiests get to do talks at churches, I think not)

      Or some radical god-church members would burn or bomb the place.

      You know what they say, and eye for an eye...
    • bestonnet_00
      ... With Isreal. No. They have a state religion but they have seperate leaders for religion and politics. ... In Iran. The leader of the country is a
      Message 40 of 40 , Oct 25, 2002
        --- In deathtoreligion@y..., Captain Trips <tripsbanzai@y...> wrote:
        > The leader of Israel is also their religious leader as well?

        With Isreal. No. They have a state religion but they have seperate
        leaders for religion and politics.

        > Well, as previously mentioned, history is not my forte. Current
        > events suffers as well by proxy. When I was writing that, I was
        > thinking about Iran and their shaw (which is probably not spelled
        > that way). Isn't he the political and religious leader of their >
        > country?

        In Iran. The leader of the country is a religious leader.

        > The 9/11 attacks were also perpetrated by those who combine politics
        > with religion, but they aren't viewed in the light of this is what
        > happens when you combine the two.

        It's actually what happens when a person believes that politics should
        be dictated by religion.

        > The terrorists are viewed as fanatics, on a holy war to attack the
        > religion of the west (christianity).

        In a way this is actually quite true. Just that they want to attack a
        lot more then just christianity.

        > And this unfortunate viewpoint only serves to strengthen the ties of
        > religion and politics, to defend said religion.

        Yes. For some christians it becomes a war against the muslims. It's
        good to see that it hasn't gotten to that stage and I think those
        actually running it from the US axis (i.e. not bush) should be
        congratulated for it. It would've been very easy to make it a
        religious war (bush almost did).

        > I knew I was probably wrong when I wrote that there were no modern
        > examples, but maybe the problem is that they are not being "spun" as
        > problems stemming from a lack of separation between church and
        > state,and thus praising our system for keeping such forces in check.

        That is the problem. Another problem is that many christians have
        this strange idea that their religion is somehow better then any
        others (in reality it's actually a good deal worse then the others)
        and so they're religion wouldn't do such things.

        Therefore they just can't see the problem that's staring them right in
        the face.
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