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Brian Update

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  • lauraandmyson
    Very exciting news. We met with the surgeon yesterday and he says that Brian s cochlea is perfect. Nothing wrong there so we can go ahead and have the
    Message 1 of 5 , May 16, 2006
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      Very exciting news. We met with the surgeon yesterday and he says
      that Brian's cochlea is perfect. Nothing wrong there so we can go
      ahead and have the surgery without complications (hopefully). He's
      seemed like a very nice guy. He said that the person who had a baby
      was ahead of us and had just had the surgery last week. If he would
      have known we were in the waiting room, he would have let us see the
      incision he made on the other baby to show us there is no scarring
      behind the ear. Anyways, our surgery is set for June 9. The pre-opt
      is June 1. We will meet with the anasthesiologist that day as well as
      the rest of the other physicians that will be monitoring Brian in the
      room. They monitor the facial nerve to make sure there is no facial
      paralysis. As the doctor was describing all that was going to happen,
      I was about to break down and cry all over again. I just want to get
      this over with so I can have a "hearing" child again.
    • tina blue
      That is great news! This means that as he learns language, he will have hearing to help him. Do make sure, though, to have him learn sign and to learn it as a
      Message 2 of 5 , May 16, 2006
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        That is great news! This means that as he learns
        language, he will have hearing to help him.

        Do make sure, though, to have him learn sign and to
        learn it as a family, too. Many hearing families are
        now teaching sign to their babies because babies can
        sign words and sentences long before they can say
        them, because it takes a while for the mouth and
        tongue to develop enough for language. A baby who can
        say what he needs is happier than one who must cry at
        you and hope you can guess what's wrong.

        Jo, one of the founders of the original deaf board,
        had an implant, you know. She was very happy with it.




        --- lauraandmyson <lauraandmyson@...> wrote:

        > Very exciting news. We met with the surgeon
        > yesterday and he says
        > that Brian's cochlea is perfect. Nothing wrong
        > there so we can go
        > ahead and have the surgery without complications
        > (hopefully). He's
        > seemed like a very nice guy. He said that the
        > person who had a baby
        > was ahead of us and had just had the surgery last
        > week. If he would
        > have known we were in the waiting room, he would
        > have let us see the
        > incision he made on the other baby to show us there
        > is no scarring
        > behind the ear. Anyways, our surgery is set for
        > June 9. The pre-opt
        > is June 1. We will meet with the anasthesiologist
        > that day as well as
        > the rest of the other physicians that will be
        > monitoring Brian in the
        > room. They monitor the facial nerve to make sure
        > there is no facial
        > paralysis. As the doctor was describing all that
        > was going to happen,
        > I was about to break down and cry all over again. I
        > just want to get
        > this over with so I can have a "hearing" child
        > again.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >



        http://www.grammartips.homestead.com/index.html


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      • jo_stays_home
        Great news! As a recent implantee myself, I d just like to mention a few things. For one, don t expect miracles, okay, granted, he s a child and he ll
        Message 3 of 5 , May 19, 2006
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          Great news! As a 'recent' implantee myself, I'd just like to
          mention a few things. For one, don't expect miracles, okay,
          granted, he's a child and he'll probably make bigger leaps and
          bounds than us adult implantees, but it is a slow process with huge
          leaps here and there. Everyone has a different way of reacting to
          an implant and there is a small group that, despite these great
          advances, an implant just doesn't work for them.

          Do realize that suddenly hearing 'everything' is a huge shock to the
          system - even now, a year later, I still find the world to be an
          immensely noisy place and there are times when it is just too
          overwhelming and I need to take it off in order to regain my sanity.

          And it's not fair that children get a small incision while adults
          end up with half their heads shaved and at least a 6" fish hook
          scar! ;-) Again, everyone heals differently and make sure you
          follow instructions closely (i.e. keep it clean, dry, etc.) so Brian
          doesn't get an infection. There are risks involved, such as the
          facial nerve being damaged, some people have a taste factor (nothing
          tastes the same for a few weeks afterwards or there is a metallic
          taste to things), and last but not least, there is a risk of
          rejection. I don't want to scare you or anything but these are
          normal risks and they shouldn't be minimized make sure you've talked
          about all these and are aware of them.

          Be patient, let things progress at their own rate. I know you're
          excited about Brian hearing but it will proceed at its own pace and
          nothing you do is going to change it. Keep facing him when speaking
          to him until he finally understands that it's your face with your
          voice. I found this to be hard - my husband's voice was a lot
          deeper than I originally thought it was and it took me several weeks
          to get the identification pegged. I can't remember how much
          residual hearing Brian has (don't post often but I constantly lurk)
          but my audiologist once told me that in HoH people, the area of the
          brain that deciphers sounds is so screwed up. Usually about 2/3 of
          the area is used for pigeonholing sounds (ah, that's an airplane)
          and the rest is for understanding. With us HoHs (actually I'm a
          deafie now if you want to get technical about it)it's the other way
          around - the area of our brain uses that 2/3 power not for
          identification but for understanding. It takes a while to rewire
          it.

          Last but not least, love the kid. He's going to need lots of hugs
          and reassurance during this procedure which can be scary (even for
          an adult). His head is going to hurt, his ear is going to hurt, or
          it might not. But give him a hug for me, would you? Best of luck
          to both of you!

          Jo

          --- In deafnessandhearingloss@yahoogroups.com, "lauraandmyson"
          <lauraandmyson@...> wrote:
          >
          > Very exciting news. We met with the surgeon yesterday and he says
          > that Brian's cochlea is perfect. Nothing wrong there so we can go
          > ahead and have the surgery without complications (hopefully).
          He's
          > seemed like a very nice guy. He said that the person who had a
          baby
          > was ahead of us and had just had the surgery last week. If he
          would
          > have known we were in the waiting room, he would have let us see
          the
          > incision he made on the other baby to show us there is no scarring
          > behind the ear. Anyways, our surgery is set for June 9. The pre-
          opt
          > is June 1. We will meet with the anasthesiologist that day as
          well as
          > the rest of the other physicians that will be monitoring Brian in
          the
          > room. They monitor the facial nerve to make sure there is no
          facial
          > paralysis. As the doctor was describing all that was going to
          happen,
          > I was about to break down and cry all over again. I just want to
          get
          > this over with so I can have a "hearing" child again.
          >
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