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Akubi - Daruma Yawning

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  • Greve Gabi
    Akubi - Daruma Yawning あくびの達磨―退屈散歩 First let us read Mr. Kyobashi s comment on the subject. 日本語はこちらにあります。
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 3, 2010
      Akubi - Daruma Yawning
      あくびの達磨―退屈散歩


      First let us read Mr. Kyobashi's comment on the subject.
      日本語はこちらにあります。
      http://WWW.amie.or.jp/daruma/akubi.html

      " This yawning Daruma is only about 5 cm tall and fits perfectly in
      the palm of my hand. I got him in Hida Takayama. Opening his mouth
      real wide he reminds me of Daruma Daishi sitting in front of the wall
      (menpeki kunen 面壁九年) in the temple Suuzan (崇山) in China. Yawning loud
      (akubi 欠伸) is not a socially correct behaviour, but to strech your
      arms and back and take a deep breath brings oxygen to your brain and
      helps your mind to be sharp. So it is no wonder Daruma during his long
      periods of meditation took a good yawn once in a while. And just this
      moment is captured in some of these humorous statues."



      For more information contact the Japanese Daruma Association (全日本達磨研究会).
      参考:「あくび達磨」については、『だるま9号』 (全日本だるま研究会発行)に「あくび達磨考」として 村上本二郎氏の詳細な報告がある。

      全日本だるま研究会の連絡先:浜松市肴町313-11 事務局長・田島哲三氏、
      または 中村 浩訳氏 nakamura2@...


      I will now give a short summary of the very detailed and informative
      article in the magazine Nr. 9 of the Daruma Association by Mr.
      Murakami.
      The illustrations are from my own collection, since the pictures are
      only in black and white.

      Two papermachee Daruma dolls yawning
      Papermachee Darumas (張子) are quite common in Japan, but a Yawning
      Daruma of this kind seems to be seldom and only produced in Nagoya and
      Fushimi, Kyoto.
          The Yawning Daruma from Fushimi
      This is a little fellow of about 9 cm with a headband (hachimaki 鉢巻),
      typical of Nagoya. He was made by Katayama Ryuu of Fushimi ward,
      Kyooto.
          The Yawning Daruma from Nagoya
      This doll has the belly protruding and the face looking into the sky,
      his yawn going right into space. We will talk about Nagoya Papermachee
      Darumas in a different story. Some of them have little balls of clay
      inside and make a ratteling noise when you shake them.

      Wooden Yawning Darumas from Hida Takayama
      The town Takayama in Gifu Prefecture is well known for woodcarving,
      especially "with one blade" (ittoobori 一刀彫り). The Yawning Darumas are
      about 5 to 10 cm high and are a speciality of this area. They are part
      of the tradition of making netsuke (根付) in this area since the Edo
      period and mostly made of wood from the local Ichi-I tree (一位). Maybe
      the craftsmen from Takayama went to Edo and took the idea from
      pictures depicting a yawning Daruma in the Hokusai tradition.

      (One of my two fellows has a pretty long face and shows little teeth,
      the other one has no teeth, but his beard is growing visibly, he looks
      quite haggard and fed up with meditation!
      私が持っている二人です。一人の顔は細長くて、小さい歯が見えます。もう一人には歯はありませんが、ヒゲをはやしています。ちょっと疲れた表情がうまい!




      Clay Dolls of a Yawning Daruma
      Some of these are represented with hands folded unter the robe, others
      have the hands streched wide above the head. Inahata Clay Dolls
      (稲畑土人形), which have a long tradition, feature some of these Darumas.
      They also come as little incense burners or water drippers for
      calligraphy. Another type is in the form of an ashtray with Daruma's
      mouth wide open, made in Kanazawa.

      Yawning Daruma Stretching Arms over his Head
      They are usually in form of little handwarmers (teaburi 手あぶり) and have
      a big open mouth to put in small pieces of charcoal and sometimes the
      inside is black with use. Some are made in Kutani.
      Another type is used as a vase for small flowers.



      There is also a little piggy bank with a Yawning Daruma. It is only
      about 8 cm high and has the characters for "Money saving" on his
      belly. It is in the tradition of Yano clay dolls (矢野土人形) from Saga
      Prefecture in Kyushu. But it is too small to put in money, so he is
      just yawning away waiting to grow. Yano clay dolls are known for piggy
      banks during the Russian War and were not made much after that.

      We also find small clay bells (dorei 土鈴) with this Yawning Daruma.
      They are made in Kyoto, Kiyomizu-saka by Takahashi Kiyoshi. Sometimes
      they have a flywhisk hanging over the arm.



      Finally we have tiny Yawning Darumas with an open mouth used to hold
      matches (or tootpicks). They were made in the Kyoto-area just after
      the war.

      So far the summary of Mr. Murakami's essay. He also mentiones a little
      statue of Hotei, one of the Seven Goods of Good Luck, with his arms
      streched out over his head and his big belly protruding. He was made
      in India, but nowadays most of these statues are Hongkong ware. I will
      tell you more about these seven lucky ones in a different story.


      Now I would like to mention the HP of a Japanese collector of frogs,
      who got hooked to the Yawning Daruma during a trip to Takayama.
      蛙を集める方が高山の旅の途中であくび達磨に出会ったHPを紹介します。



      見よ!この飛騨の職人技を。 イチイの一刀彫の「あくびだるま」だ。 カエルと関係ないけど。高さ、約 5 B 。
      http://www.mnet.ne.jp/~emonyama/synapse/kaeru3.html


      Let us check out Takayama just a little more. It is also called
      "Little Kyoto" and is well worth a trip.
      On this HP, you find a general introduction about traveling in Hida Takayama.
      http://www.hidatakayama.or.jp/english/index.html
      飛騨高山の旅、日本語版
      http://www.hidatakayama.or.jp/

      Or check the following HP in English about local arts and crafts,
      where some carving of Yewwood (ichi-I 一位) is mentioned.
      飛騨高山の物産、民芸を紹介するHP:
      http://www.hida.jp/e-kankou/e-dentou/e-dentou.htm

      There is a Daruma Market in February in Takayama too:
      2月11日(月・祝)(予定) 本町通り 飛騨高山だるま市 本町通りの風物詩「だるま市」が立ちます。
      問い合わせ:高山市観光課(0577-35-3145)

      Read more about the interesting festivals at Takayama in English:
      高山の祭りについてはこちらのHPです。
      http://www.hidanet.ne.jp/e02/ematsuri/ekigen.htm

      The local inn Yamaichi has quite a unique HP for foreigners traveling
      in the area, even explaining how to take a Japanese bath!
      やまいち宿泊施設のHPはこちらです。
      http://www.kbnet.jp.org/11pm/kamaya/hyoshi.html


      Let us leave Takayama and look at the HP of Sakano Koko, a potter who
      introduces nice individual yawning Darumas and others.
      さかのここ手造り陶芸工房奮戦記


      あくびの達磨 達磨大師

      世界に1つしかない 最初から思った通り出来ません。 出来上がる作品は1割以上も小さくなります 出来た作品は世界名1つしかない私の作品
      http://www.medias.ne.jp/~at-banno/newteruko-05.htm


      At last two more pieces from my collection. One is an ashtray with an
      open-mouthed Daruma, his little face quite squashed by the big mouth.
      He is about 12 cm high and has obviously been in use for quite a
      while.
      最後に私のコレクションの二人を紹介したいとおもいます。 一人はあかい灰皿ですが、口を大きくあけ、目や鼻がつぶれそうになっているだるま。


      And one more little pottery human Daruma of only 11 cm hight, who is
      yawning away, stretching one hand over his head as if he was thinking:
      "Do I have to do all that meditating? Should I take a day off today?"
      with a really human expression, his little teeth beautifully modeled
      and the little tounge sticking out. His toes are also quite unique.
      私のコレクションにもう一人あくびの達磨さんがいます。手を頭にあて、まるで、“座禅はもういや。今日は休みたいな。。。!”と言う表情です。小さい歯と足の指も見事。



      This concludes the stories about the Yawning Daruma. I think I am
      going to take a good strech now and yawn myself. Care to join me?
      Whaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!
      これであくび達磨の話を終わります。私もこれからストレチングし大あくびをします。
      どうぞご一緒に うあああああああああああああああああああ!


      Addition from September 2002

      From Bob W. in America we received these wonderful Darumas yawning
      away. "My family lived in Japan 100 years ago, and may have acquired
      them there at that time. I've known them for more than 60 years. They
      are about 5 cm. in height and all sitting down."
      “100年も前からうちの家族が日本に住んだことがあるときから家族の宝物です。 みんなが座って、5cmぐらいの高さです。”
      Thank you so much, Bob, for sharing them with us.



      :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

      <a href="http://darumasan.blogspot.com/">Daruma Museum </a>

      :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
    • Worldkigo Database / Gabi Greve
      Now it is HERE http://darumasan.blogspot.com/2004/11/akubi-daruma-yawning.html
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 23, 2010
        Now it is HERE
        http://darumasan.blogspot.com/2004/11/akubi-daruma-yawning.html




        >
        > Akubi - Daruma Yawning
        > あくびのé"磨―退屈散歩
        >
        >
        > First let us read Mr. Kyobashi's comment on the subject.
        > 日本語ãEã"ちらにあります、E> http://WWW.amie.or.jp/daruma/akubi.html
        >
        > " This yawning Daruma is only about 5 cm tall and fits perfectly in
        > the palm of my hand. I got him in Hida Takayama. Opening his mouth
        > real wide he reminds me of Daruma Daishi sitting in front of the wall
        > (menpeki kunen 面壁九年) in the temple Suuzan (崁E±±) in China. Yawning loud
        > (akubi 欠伸) is not a socially correct behaviour, but to strech your
        > arms and back and take a deep breath brings oxygen to your brain and
        > helps your mind to be sharp. So it is no wonder Daruma during his long
        > periods of meditation took a good yawn once in a while. And just this
        > moment is captured in some of these humorous statues."
        >
        >
        >
        > For more information contact the Japanese Daruma Association (全日本é"磨ç "究企E.
        > 参老E¼šï½¢ã‚くびé"磨E£ã«ã¤ãE¦ã¯E¤ã€Žã ã‚‹ã¾E™å·ã€E(全日本だるまç "究会発衁EにE¢ã‚くびé"磨老E½£ã¨ã—て æ`上本二郎氏ãE詳細な報å`ŠãŒã‚る、E>
        > 全日本だるまç "究会ãE連絡先:浜松市肴ç"º313-11 事務局長・ç"°å³¶å"²ä¸‰æ°ã€E> またãE 中æ` 浩訳氁Enakamura2@...
        >
        >
        > I will now give a short summary of the very detailed and informative
        > article in the magazine Nr. 9 of the Daruma Association by Mr.
        > Murakami.
        > The illustrations are from my own collection, since the pictures are
        > only in black and white.
        >
        > Two papermachee Daruma dolls yawning
        > Papermachee Darumas (張孁E are quite common in Japan, but a Yawning
        > Daruma of this kind seems to be seldom and only produced in Nagoya and
        > Fushimi, Kyoto.
        >     The Yawning Daruma from Fushimi
        > This is a little fellow of about 9 cm with a headband (hachimaki 鉢巻),
        > typical of Nagoya. He was made by Katayama Ryuu of Fushimi ward,
        > Kyooto.
        >     The Yawning Daruma from Nagoya
        > This doll has the belly protruding and the face looking into the sky,
        > his yawn going right into space. We will talk about Nagoya Papermachee
        > Darumas in a different story. Some of them have little balls of clay
        > inside and make a ratteling noise when you shake them.
        >
        > Wooden Yawning Darumas from Hida Takayama
        > The town Takayama in Gifu Prefecture is well known for woodcarving,
        > especially "with one blade" (ittoobori 一刀彫めE. The Yawning Darumas are
        > about 5 to 10 cm high and are a speciality of this area. They are part
        > of the tradition of making netsuke (根仁E in this area since the Edo
        > period and mostly made of wood from the local Ichi-I tree (一佁E. Maybe
        > the craftsmen from Takayama went to Edo and took the idea from
        > pictures depicting a yawning Daruma in the Hokusai tradition.
        >
        > (One of my two fellows has a pretty long face and shows little teeth,
        > the other one has no teeth, but his beard is growing visibly, he looks
        > quite haggard and fed up with meditation!
        > 私が持ってぁE‚‹äºŒäººã§ã™ã€‚一人のé¡"ãE細長くて、小さぁE­¯ãŒè¦‹ãˆã¾ã™ã€‚もぁE¸€äººã«ã¯æ­¯ã¯ã‚りませã‚"が、ãƒ'ゲã‚'ãEめE—てぁE¾ã™ã€‚ちめE£ã¨ç–²ã‚ŒãŸè¡¨æƒEŒãE¾ãE¼E>
        >
        >
        >
        > Clay Dolls of a Yawning Daruma
        > Some of these are represented with hands folded unter the robe, others
        > have the hands streched wide above the head. Inahata Clay Dolls
        > (稲ç•`土人形), which have a long tradition, feature some of these Darumas.
        > They also come as little incense burners or water drippers for
        > calligraphy. Another type is in the form of an ashtray with Daruma's
        > mouth wide open, made in Kanazawa.
        >
        > Yawning Daruma Stretching Arms over his Head
        > They are usually in form of little handwarmers (teaburi 手あぶめE and have
        > a big open mouth to put in small pieces of charcoal and sometimes the
        > inside is black with use. Some are made in Kutani.
        > Another type is used as a vase for small flowers.
        >
        >
        >
        > There is also a little piggy bank with a Yawning Daruma. It is only
        > about 8 cm high and has the characters for "Money saving" on his
        > belly. It is in the tradition of Yano clay dolls (矢野土人形) from Saga
        > Prefecture in Kyushu. But it is too small to put in money, so he is
        > just yawning away waiting to grow. Yano clay dolls are known for piggy
        > banks during the Russian War and were not made much after that.
        >
        > We also find small clay bells (dorei 土鈴) with this Yawning Daruma.
        > They are made in Kyoto, Kiyomizu-saka by Takahashi Kiyoshi. Sometimes
        > they have a flywhisk hanging over the arm.
        >
        >
        >
        > Finally we have tiny Yawning Darumas with an open mouth used to hold
        > matches (or tootpicks). They were made in the Kyoto-area just after
        > the war.
        >
        > So far the summary of Mr. Murakami's essay. He also mentiones a little
        > statue of Hotei, one of the Seven Goods of Good Luck, with his arms
        > streched out over his head and his big belly protruding. He was made
        > in India, but nowadays most of these statues are Hongkong ware. I will
        > tell you more about these seven lucky ones in a different story.
        >
        >
        > Now I would like to mention the HP of a Japanese collector of frogs,
        > who got hooked to the Yawning Daruma during a trip to Takayama.
        > 蛙ã‚'雁E‚ã‚‹æ–¹ãŒé«˜å±±ã®æ—EEé€"中であくびé"磨に出会ったHPã‚'紹介します、E>
        >
        >
        > 見よEã"の飛騨の職人技ã‚'、Eイチイの一刀彫の「あくãEだるま」だ、Eカエルと関係なぁE`ど。高さ、紁E5 B 、E> http://www.mnet.ne.jp/~emonyama/synapse/kaeru3.html
        >
        >
        > Let us check out Takayama just a little more. It is also called
        > "Little Kyoto" and is well worth a trip.
        > On this HP, you find a general introduction about traveling in Hida Takayama.
        > http://www.hidatakayama.or.jp/english/index.html
        > 飛騨高山の旁E€æ—¥æœ¬èªžç‰ˆ
        > http://www.hidatakayama.or.jp/
        >
        > Or check the following HP in English about local arts and crafts,
        > where some carving of Yewwood (ichi-I 一佁E is mentioned.
        > 飛騨高山の物ç"£ã€æ°`芸ã‚'紹介するHE°:
        > http://www.hida.jp/e-kankou/e-dentou/e-dentou.htm
        >
        > There is a Daruma Market in February in Takayama too:
        > E'月11日Eˆæœˆãƒ»ç¥ï¼‰ï¼ˆäºˆå®šï¼E本ç"ºé€šã‚Š 飛騨高山だるま币E本ç"ºé€šã‚Šã®é¢¨ç‰©è©©ã€Œã ã‚‹ã¾å¸‚」が立ちます、E> 問い合わせ:高山市観光課EE577-35-3145)
        >
        > Read more about the interesting festivals at Takayama in English:
        > 高山の祭りにつぁE¦ã¯ã"ちらãEHPです、E> http://www.hidanet.ne.jp/e02/ematsuri/ekigen.htm
        >
        > The local inn Yamaichi has quite a unique HP for foreigners traveling
        > in the area, even explaining how to take a Japanese bath!
        > めE¾ãE¡å®¿æ³Šæ–½è¨­ã®HPはã"ちらです、E> http://www.kbnet.jp.org/11pm/kamaya/hyoshi.html
        >
        >
        > Let us leave Takayama and look at the HP of Sakano Koko, a potter who
        > introduces nice individual yawning Darumas and others.
        > さかのã"ã"手造り陶芸工房奮戦訁E>
        >
        > あくびのé"磨 é"磨大師
        >
        > 世界にE`つしかなぁE最初から思った通り出来ませã‚"、E出来上がる作å"ã¯E`割以上も小さくなりまぁE出来た作å"ã¯ä¸–界名ï¼`つしかなぁE§ãE作å"
        > http://www.medias.ne.jp/~at-banno/newteruko-05.htm
        >
        >
        > At last two more pieces from my collection. One is an ashtray with an
        > open-mouthed Daruma, his little face quite squashed by the big mouth.
        > He is about 12 cm high and has obviously been in use for quite a
        > while.
        > 最後に私ãEコレクションの二人ã‚'紹介したいとおもぁE¾ã™ã€E一人はあかぁEE皿ですが、口ã‚'大きくあã`、目めE¼»ãŒã¤ã¶ã‚ŒããE«ãªã£ã¦ãE‚‹ã ã‚‹ã¾ã€E>
        >
        > And one more little pottery human Daruma of only 11 cm hight, who is
        > yawning away, stretching one hand over his head as if he was thinking:
        > "Do I have to do all that meditating? Should I take a day off today?"
        > with a really human expression, his little teeth beautifully modeled
        > and the little tounge sticking out. His toes are also quite unique.
        > 私ãEコレクションにもう一人あくびのé"磨さã‚"がいます。手ã‚'頭にあて、まるで、“座禁EEもうぁE‚„。今日はä¼`みたいな。。。!”と言ぁE¡¨æƒE§ã™ã€‚小さぁE­¯ã¨è¶³ã®æŒE‚‚見事、E>
        >
        >
        > This concludes the stories about the Yawning Daruma. I think I am
        > going to take a good strech now and yawn myself. Care to join me?
        > Whaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!
        > ã"れであくびé"磨の話ã‚'終わります。私もã"れからストレチングし大あくびã‚'します。
        > どぁEžã"一ç·'に ぁE‚ああああああああああああああああああ!
        >
        >
        > Addition from September 2002
        >
        > From Bob W. in America we received these wonderful Darumas yawning
        > away. "My family lived in Japan 100 years ago, and may have acquired
        > them there at that time. I've known them for more than 60 years. They
        > are about 5 cm. in height and all sitting down."
        >  E00年も前からぁE¡ã®å®¶æ—ãŒæ—¥æœ¬ã«ä½ã‚"だã"とがあるときから家族ãE宝物です、Eみã‚"なが座って、EcmぐらぁEE高さです。 E> Thank you so much, Bob, for sharing them with us.
        >
        >
        >
        > :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
        >
        > <a href="http://darumasan.blogspot.com/">Daruma Museum </a>
        >
        > :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
        >
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