Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

try to give away everything before death

Expand Messages
  • Antony Woods
    Bhikkhu Pesala wrote: 14. Generosity Craving and attachment are the causes of suffering. Less craving means less suffering. Buddhists should cultivate
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 1, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Bhikkhu Pesala wrote:

      14. Generosity
      Craving and attachment are the causes of suffering. Less craving means less
      suffering. Buddhists should cultivate generosity and renunciation as much as
      possible. If a man wakes up to find his house on fire, he will try to get
      his most valuable property out of the house before it burns down. A Buddhist
      should therefore try to give away everything before death. Since no one
      knows when that will be, one should keep only what one needs for one�s daily
      life and work.
      http://www.aimwell.org/Books/Library/Pesala/Mangala/mangala.html

      May this be of benefit.

      May you be well and happy,

      Antony.
    • Antony Woods
      For me it is one of life s imponderables how much to give as generosity. The other side of this argument is that a Buddhist should ensure they have enough to
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 1, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        For me it is one of life's imponderables how much to give as generosity.
        The other side of this argument is that a Buddhist should ensure they have
        enough to survive until death (by taking refuge in the local bank) Or could
        the good karma from generosity ripen in the present life as a secure old
        age?.

        What do you think?

        Thanks

        Antony.

        --- Original Message ---
        Bhikkhu Pesala wrote:

        14. Generosity
        Craving and attachment are the causes of suffering. Less craving means less
        suffering. Buddhists should cultivate generosity and renunciation as much as
        possible. If a man wakes up to find his house on fire, he will try to get
        his most valuable property out of the house before it burns down. A Buddhist
        should therefore try to give away everything before death. Since no one
        knows when that will be, one should keep only what one needs for one�s daily
        life and work.
        http://www.aimwell.org/Books/Library/Pesala/Mangala/mangala.html
      • Colin D. Neal
        Dear Antony: I think it s important to try to balance these two objectives, i.e., avoiding being a miser and dieing without having helped others, but also
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 1, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          Dear Antony:

          I think it's important to try to balance these two objectives, i.e.,
          avoiding being a miser and dieing without having helped others, but also
          avoiding exhausting all one's resources long before death, so that one
          becomes a burden to others.

          Best wishes....Colin


          On Wed, 1 Dec 2004, Antony Woods wrote:

          > For me it is one of life's imponderables how much to give as generosity.
          > The other side of this argument is that a Buddhist should ensure they have
          > enough to survive until death (by taking refuge in the local bank) Or could
          > the good karma from generosity ripen in the present life as a secure old
          > age?.
          >
          > What do you think?
          > Thanks
          > Antony.
          >
          > --- Original Message ---
          > Bhikkhu Pesala wrote:
          >
          > 14. Generosity
          > Craving and attachment are the causes of suffering. Less craving means less
          > suffering. Buddhists should cultivate generosity and renunciation as much as
          > possible. If a man wakes up to find his house on fire, he will try to get
          > his most valuable property out of the house before it burns down. A Buddhist
          > should therefore try to give away everything before death. Since no one
          > knows when that will be, one should keep only what one needs for one’s daily
          > life and work.
          > http://www.aimwell.org/Books/Library/Pesala/Mangala/mangala.html
        • Antony Woods
          Dear Colin and Group, I don t know if I agree with it but here is a quote from a Dhammapada story: When the bhikkhus heard about this, they asked the Buddha,
          Message 4 of 5 , Dec 1, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            Dear Colin and Group,

            I don't know if I agree with it but here is a quote from a Dhammapada story:

            When the bhikkhus heard about this, they asked the Buddha,

            "How is it that, in the case of this brahmin, a good deed done at present
            bears fruit immediately?"

            To them the Buddha replied

            "If the brahmin had offered his outer garment in the first watch of the
            night, he would have been rewarded with sixteen of each kind;

            if he had made his offering during the middle watch, he would have been
            rewarded with eight of each kind;

            since he had made his offering only during the last watch of the night, he
            was rewarded with only four of each kind."

            So, when one wants to give in charity, one should do so quickly;

            if one procrastinates, the reward comes slowly and only sparingly.

            Also, if one is too slow in doing good deeds, one may not be able to do it
            at all, for the mind tends to take delight in doing evil.

            Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

            Verse 116
            One should make haste in doing good deeds;
            One should restrain one's mind from evil;
            For the mind of one who is slow in doing good tends to delight in doing
            evil.
            http://www.buddhanet.net/budsas/ebud/dhp/f.htm#culekasataka

            May you be well and happy,

            Antony.
          • antony272b2
            When the bhikkhus heard about this, they asked the Buddha, How is it that, in the case of this brahmin, a good deed done at present bears fruit immediately?
            Message 5 of 5 , May 21, 2010
            • 0 Attachment
              "When the bhikkhus heard about this, they asked the Buddha,

              "How is it that, in the case of this brahmin, a good deed done at present bears fruit immediately?"

              To them the Buddha replied

              "If the brahmin had offered his outer garment in the first watch of the night, he would have been rewarded with sixteen of each kind; if he had made his offering during the middle watch, he would have been rewarded with eight of each kind; since he had made his offering only during the last watch of the night, he was rewarded with only four of each kind."

              So, when one wants to give in charity, one should do so quickly; if one procrastinates, the reward comes slowly and only sparingly. Also, if one is too slow in doing good deeds, one may not be able to do it at all, for the mind tends to take delight in doing evil.

              Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

              Verse 116
              One should make haste in doing good deeds;
              One should restrain one's mind from evil;
              For the mind of one who is slow in doing good tends to delight in doing evil.
              http://www.buddhanet.net/budsas/ebud/dhp/f.htm#culekasataka
              From: The Dhammapada Stories
              Translated by Daw Mya Tin, M.A.,
              Burma Pitaka Association 1986
              Source: http://www.nibbana.com

              With metta / Antony.
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.