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Satisfaction from Metta (Buddhist Economics by Ven P.A. Payutto)

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  • antony272b2
    A fundamental principle of modern economics states that people will only agree to part with something when they can replace it with something that affords
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 6, 2011
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      "A fundamental principle of modern economics states that people will only agree to part with something when they can replace it with something that affords them equal or more satisfaction. But this principle only considers the satisfaction that comes from owning material goods. Sometimes we can experience a sense of satisfaction by parting with something without getting anything tangible in return, as when parents give their children gifts: because of the love they feel for their children, they feel a more rewarding sense of satisfaction than if they had received something in return. If human beings could expand their love to all other people, rather than confining it to their own families, then they might be able to part with things without receiving anything in return, and experience more satisfaction in doing so. This satisfaction comes not from a desire to obtain things to make ourselves happy (tanha), but from a desire for the well-being of others (chanda: when directed toward other beings, is called metta, goodwill, the desire for others' welfare.)"
      http://www.buddhanet.net/cmdsg/econ2.htm#Ethics
      From: Buddhist Economics: A Middle Way for the Market Place by Ven P.A. Payutto

      With metta / Antony :)
    • antony272b2
      A fundamental principle of modern economics states that people will only agree to part with something when they can replace it with something that affords
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 16, 2012
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        "A fundamental principle of modern economics states that people will only agree to part with something when they can replace it with something that affords them equal or more satisfaction. But this principle only considers the satisfaction that comes from owning material goods. Sometimes we can experience a sense of satisfaction by parting with something without getting anything tangible in return, as when parents give their children gifts: because of the love they feel for their children, they feel a more rewarding sense of satisfaction than if they had received something in return.

        If human beings could expand their love to all other people, rather than confining it to their own families, then they might be able to part with things without receiving anything in return, and experience more satisfaction in doing so. This satisfaction comes not from a desire to obtain things to make ourselves happy (tanha), but from a desire for the well-being of others (chanda: when directed toward other beings, is called metta, goodwill, the desire for others' welfare.)"
        http://www.buddhanet.net/cmdsg/econ2.htm#Ethics
        From: Buddhist Economics: A Middle Way for the Market Place by Ven P.A. Payutto

        With metta / Antony.
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