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Real joy from giving without demanding appreciation by Ajahn Sumedho

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  • Antony Woods
    Real joy comes from giving and not caring about whether anyone even knows or acknowledges it. As soon as the self comes in (for example: I m giving this dana
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 4, 2009
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      "Real joy comes from giving and not caring about whether anyone even
      knows or acknowledges it. As soon as the self comes in (for example:
      'I'm giving this dana to you and it is very important that you know
      who's giving this dana. - ME, I'm giving it!') then the amount of joy
      that comes from giving is probably very minimal. If I'm so concerned
      about being recognised and being appreciated, that you appreciate my
      generosity and my goodness, then that becomes a joyless state of mind.
      One cannot feel happy or have real joyfulness in living if there is
      attachment to the idea that one's actions should be recognised.
      There's nothing wrong with people appreciating somebody else's
      goodness and generosity, but when we don't demand it, then there is joy."
      http://www.amaravati.org/abmnew/documents/the_way_it_is/25atl.html
      From: A Time to Love by Ajahn Sumedho
    • antony272b2
      Real joy comes from giving and not caring about whether anyone even knows or acknowledges it. As soon as the self comes in (for example: I m giving this dana
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 23, 2009
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        "Real joy comes from giving and not caring about
        whether anyone even knows or acknowledges it.
        As soon as the self comes in (for example:
        'I'm giving this dana to you
        and it is very important that you know
        who's giving this dana. -
        ME, I'm giving it!')
        then the amount of joy that comes from giving
        is probably very minimal.
        If I'm so concerned about being recognised
        and being appreciated,
        that you appreciate my generosity and my goodness,
        then that becomes a joyless state of mind.
        One cannot feel happy or have real joyfulness in living
        if there is attachment to the idea
        that one's actions should be recognised.
        There's nothing wrong with people
        appreciating somebody else's goodness and generosity,
        but when we don't demand it, then there is joy."
        http://www.amaravati.org/abmnew/documents/the_way_it_is/25atl.html
        From: A Time to Love by Ajahn Sumedho
      • antony272b2
        Real joy comes from giving and not caring about whether anyone even knows or acknowledges it. As soon as the self comes in (for example: I m giving this dana
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 7, 2011
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          "Real joy comes from giving and not caring about whether anyone even knows or acknowledges it. As soon as the self comes in (for example: 'I'm giving this dana to you and it is very important that you know who's giving this dana. - ME, I'm giving it!') then the amount of joy that comes from giving is probably very minimal. If I'm so concerned about being recognised and being appreciated, that you appreciate my generosity and my goodness, then that becomes a joyless state of mind. One cannot feel happy or have real joyfulness in living if there is attachment to the idea that one's actions should be recognised. There's nothing wrong with people appreciating somebody else's goodness and generosity, but when we don't demand it, then there is joy."
          http://www.amaravati.org/abmnew/documents/the_way_it_is/25atl.html
          From: A Time to Love by Ajahn Sumedho
        • antony272b2
          Real joy comes from giving and not caring about whether anyone even knows or acknowledges it. As soon as the self comes in (for example: I m giving this dana
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 14, 2012
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            "Real joy comes from giving and not caring about whether anyone even knows or acknowledges it. As soon as the self comes in (for example: 'I'm giving this dana to you and it is very important that you know who's giving this dana. - ME, I'm giving it!') then the amount of joy that comes from giving is probably very minimal. If I'm so concerned about being recognised and being appreciated, that you appreciate my generosity and my goodness, then that becomes a joyless state of mind. One cannot feel happy or have real joyfulness in living if there is attachment to the idea that one's actions should be recognised. There's nothing wrong with people appreciating somebody else's goodness and generosity, but when we don't demand it, then there is joy."
            http://www.amaravati.org/abmnew/documents/the_way_it_is/25atl.html
            From: A Time to Love by Ajahn Sumedho

            With metta / Antony.
          • antony272b2
            Real joy comes from giving and not caring about whether anyone even knows or acknowledges it. As soon as the self comes in (for example: I m giving this dana
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 17, 2013
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              "Real joy comes from giving and not caring about whether anyone even knows or acknowledges it. As soon as the self comes in (for example: 'I'm giving this dana to you and it is very important that you know who's giving this dana. - ME, I'm giving it!') then the amount of joy that comes from giving is probably very minimal. If I'm so concerned about being recognised and being appreciated, that you appreciate my generosity and my goodness, then that becomes a joyless state of mind. One cannot feel happy or have real joyfulness in living if there is attachment to the idea that one's actions should be recognised. There's nothing wrong with people appreciating somebody else's goodness and generosity, but when we don't demand it, then there is joy."
              http://www.amaravati.org/abmnew/documents/the_way_it_is/25atl.html
              From: A Time to Love by Ajahn Sumedho

              With metta / Antony.
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