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Re: 5 uses of wealth by a noble disciple

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  • Antony Woods
    With his wealth collected justly, won through his own efforts, he shares both food and drink with beings who are in need. Itivuttaka 66 From: The Daily Words
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 22, 2005
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      "With his wealth collected justly,
      won through his own efforts,
      he shares both food and drink
      with beings who are in need.

      Itivuttaka 66

      From: "The Daily Words of the Buddha", a free service of Pariyatti,
      sent by request to those who subscribe at:
      http://www.pariyatti.com/words.phtml

      --- In dana-giving@yahoogroups.com, "Antony Woods" <antony272b@h...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Veneration to the Most Exalted, the Purified, the Supremely
      > Enlightened Buddha
      >
      > "Herein, householder, there are five uses to which wealth can be
      put.
      > They are:
      >
      > "With the wealth that has been obtained by his own diligent labor,
      > acquired through the strength of his own arms and the sweat of his
      > own brow, rightly acquired, rightly gained, the noble disciple
      > supports himself comfortably, sufficiently, he applies himself to
      > seeing to his own happiness in rightful ways. He supports his
      father
      > and mother ... wife and children, servants and workers comfortably,
      > to a sufficiency, applying himself to their needs and their
      happiness
      > as is proper. This is the first benefit to obtained from wealth.
      >
      > "Moreover, with the wealth.....rightly gained, the noble disciple
      > supports his friends and associates comfortably, to a sufficiency,
      > taking an interest in their happiness as is proper. This is the
      > second benefit to be derived from wealth.
      >
      > "Moreover, with the wealth.......rightly gained, the noble disciple
      > protects his wealth from the dangers of confiscation by kings,
      theft,
      > fire, flood, and appropriation by unfavored relatives. He sees to
      his
      > own security. This is the third benefit to be derived from wealth.
      >
      > "Moreover, with the wealth......rightly gained, the noble disciple
      > makes the five kinds of sacrifice. They are: to relatives
      (supporting
      > relatives); to visitors (receiving guests); to ancestors (offerings
      > made in the name of ancestors); to the king (for taxes and public
      > works); and to the gods (that is, he supports religion). This is
      > another benefit to be derived from wealth.
      >
      > "Moreover, with the wealth that has been obtained by his own
      diligent
      > labor, acquired through the strength of his own arms and the sweat
      of
      > his own brow, rightly acquired, rightly gained, the noble disciple
      > makes offerings which are of the highest merit, which are conducive
      > to mental well-being, happiness and heaven, to religious
      mendicants,
      > those who live devoted to heedfulness, are established in patience
      > and gentleness, are trained, calmed, and cooled of defilements.
      This
      > is the fifth benefit to be obtained from wealth.
      >
      > "Householder, there are these five benefits to be obtained from
      > wealth. If wealth is used by a noble disciple in such a way that
      > these five benefits are fulfilled, and if it should then become
      > spent, that noble disciple can reflect thus: 'Whatever benefit is
      to
      > be obtained from wealth, I have obtained. Now my wealth is spent.'
      > That noble disciple experiences no distress on that account. And
      if,
      > after that noble disciple has used his wealth to provide these five
      > benefits, that wealth should increase, that noble disciple reflects
      > thus: 'Whatever benefit is to be obtained from my wealth I have
      > already obtained. And now my wealth has increased.' That noble
      > disciple is also not distressed on that account; he is distressed
      in
      > neither case." [A.III.45]
      > http://www.buddhanet.net/cmdsg/econ5.htm#The%20Benefits
      > From: Chapter 5, "Buddhist Economics: A Middle Way for the Market
      > Place" by Ven P.A. Payutto.
      >
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