Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Midland hello

Expand Messages
  • Dennis
    It sounds like you might have a frozen bearing. They were usually bronze with lithium grease or oil for lubrication. A lot of console manufacturers used
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      It sounds like you might have a frozen bearing. They were usually
      bronze with lithium grease or oil for lubrication.

      A lot of console manufacturers used Garrard turntables and they were
      considered the best. It's a lot easier to find parts for them and the
      changer types are available for little or no money.

      If you deceide you want to put in a "superior engine", post it here.
      I have a friend who goes to all the estate sales and if he buys a
      console for th espeqakers and amps, he just throws them away. I am
      sure the DAC members can help you out.

      Whenever I work on vintage audio equipment I always wear a white shop
      coat, like a doctors, to get me in the proper frame of mind. It helps
      reduce the impulse reach for a hammer.

      --- In dallasaudioclub@yahoogroups.com, "judy ross" <judyegr@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Hey, Dennis. I am devoting this day to your suggestions.
      > Remembering what wire goes where should be a breeze. That's the
      same
      > technique I used when removing wires from plugs and distribitor
      > caps. Ok. Since my current problem is removing the platter from
      the
      > chassis, I have put oil (all I have is 3M at the moment) into the
      > center. The spindle and mat are removed. I have tape to cover a
      > prying instrument. If I can't get an instrument inside the plinth
      > with enough room left for prying, then I will remove the chassis
      from
      > the plinth. (Ahhh, a new language.) Plinth...such a neat word,
      > never used it before. Be back later.
      > Judy
      >
      > --- In dallasaudioclub@yahoogroups.com, "Dennis" <chimeraone@>
      > wrote:
      > >
      > > Judy,
      > >
      > > I have taken more turntables out of consoles than I care to
      > remember.
      > > To make communication easier let's use some common nomencalture.
      > >
      > > Let's call the wood panel the turntabe assembly is bolted on the
      > > plinth. The round disk that rotates is called a platter. The
      rubber
      > > disk on top of the platter is called a mat. The metal base the
      > > platter sits on is called the chassis.
      > >
      > > If you are having problems removing the chassis from the plinth,
      it
      > > might be easier to tilt console so the front rests on a carpaet.
      It
      > > makes it easier to get at the hardware holding the chassis to the
      > > plinth. The first thing you do is dsiconnect the signal and power
      > > wires that connect to the turntable chassis. In some cases there
      > are
      > > connectors in some cases they need to be unsoldered. Draw a
      picture
      > > showing what color wire goes where so you can re-connect them
      > > properly. Some cahssis are spring loaded, some are fixes. But
      there
      > > will be three or four threaded studs with hex nuts holding it in.
      I
      > > always spray Kroil or Liquid Wrench on them adn wait a day to
      make
      > > sure I don't strip them.
      > >
      > > If you are trying to remove the platter from the chassis, that
      can
      > be
      > > more of a challenge. Most console turntables have automatic
      > changers
      > > with a 45 adapter. Teh platters were diecast metal usually
      aluminum
      > > and the changer mechanism is plated steel. Galvanic corrosion
      > > can "weld" the platter to the mechanism. Kroil mith help and you
      > need
      > > to try it, but if it doesn't you need to use a propane torch to
      > heat
      > > the platter. Remember these tables are sually driven by a rubber
      > > idler wheel or in rare cases a rubber belt. Keep the heat away
      from
      > > them. Remove the rubber mat and heat the top of the platter at
      the
      > > center. You can use a putty knife to gently try to pry the
      platter
      > > off. Wind masking tape arounf the putty knoe blade to prevent
      > > scratches.
      > >
      > > Like cars, vintage audio equipment has service manuals too. They
      > will
      > > usually provide blow-up drawings of the assemblies, schematics
      and
      > > voltages. Do a google search for SAMS manuals and one the sirte
      > > search for your specific brand and model, there is a very good
      > cahnce
      > > there is a SAMS for it.
      > >
      > > I am under the assumption that the colsole plays music adn the
      > > problem is just with teh turntable. In addition to soundign
      great,
      > > when soemthing does go wrong, it is usally a bad tube which is
      > easily
      > > replaced. But eventaully, when it ahppens, someone wil have to
      > > measure the voltages in the amplifiers to find out whats wrong.
      The
      > > SAMS will have the information, but you need some basic tools and
      > > knowledge to fix it. The best Basic Electronics Technician
      manuals
      > > are the old Military manuals from the 50s. Once again easily
      found
      > in
      > > a Google search. Since you are already a mechanic, it's a short
      > jump
      > > to becoming a technician.
      > >
      > > Best Regards, Dennis
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In dallasaudioclub@yahoogroups.com, "judy ross" <judyegr@>
      > > wrote:
      > > >
      > > > > ----- Original Message ----
      > > > > From: judy ross <judyegr@>
      > > > >>
      > > > > > Diamond, and other Greats.)
      > > > >
      > > > > . Only thing, the turntable is stuck, frozen,
      > > > > jammed. I am teaching myself how to repair it by taking one
      > part
      > > off
      > > > > at a time to see how it is made. >
      > > >
      > > > I still haven't been able to get this table off. It can't be
      > > welded on
      > > > or they wouldn't have put a lockpin on it. Will it hurt it if
      I
      > > put
      > > > some oil in the center to see if it will help remove it? I
      can't
      > > see
      > > > under the table from the top, and I can't see what is directly
      > > under it
      > > > from the underside, either. Jeesh! If it were a car, I would
      get
      > a
      > > > wheel puller and put some UMPHH on it! I'm trying to resist
      that
      > > ploy
      > > > for one with more finesse. Is there a trick to pulling this
      > thing
      > > off?
      > > > WHEW!
      > > > Judy
      > > >
      > >
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.