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Re: [dallasaudioclub] Midland hello

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  • James Dolan
    welcome, judy!! i am sure you ll get some interesting responses. also, i would like to invite you to have a look at www.audiokarma.org. i think you will
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 31, 2007
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      welcome, judy!!  i am sure you'll get some interesting responses.  also, i would like to invite you to have a look at www.audiokarma.org.  i think you will learn much there, and we always like to see girls join up

      ----- Original Message ----
      From: judy ross <judyegr@...>
      To: dallasaudioclub@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, January 31, 2007 6:34:55 AM
      Subject: [dallasaudioclub] Midland hello

      Hi all. I'm new here. I am a record collector.

      I have recently decided to dust them off and start playing them
      again after 20 years of CD's. I got a turntable/AM/ FM, 8-track with
      rollabout speakers from Goodwill which works great except for the 8-
      track sticking a bit. (I do have 8-track tapes:Bob Seger,Neil
      Diamond, and other Greats.)

      Then, last week I got a LLoyd's 65" stereo console. It's a 1973
      model...you know....the old 'shake-the-walls' type with woofers that
      will knock you down. Only thing, the turntable is stuck, frozen,
      jammed. I am teaching myself how to repair it by taking one part off
      at a time to see how it is made. I am NOT an electrician, but I AM a
      mechanic. I am learning a bit at a time. So far I have learned that
      there are two kinds of turntables.. .belt driven and gear driven. I
      haven't found a belt on this one yet, and it is not shown on the
      schematics. (Yes, the schematics and manual were actually inside it
      when I got it...paid 25 dollars at Salvation Army!)

      I now have a record-to-computer- to-CD system, but have not fully
      started using it yet. I will be categorizing and alphabetizing my
      records the last of March when I get a room ready for them.(I have
      quite a few thousand.)

      My goal is to be able to assemble/disassembl e components and repair
      them someday. I was once a good mechanic who gave up when the
      electronic ignition came into use. Now I am determined to learn the
      basics...how to use a tester and a soldering iron.

      I'm wondering what kind of music the majority here listen to. My
      favorites are classic rock, new age, and oldies...but I collect it
      all.

      Judy Ross-Midland


    • Jim
      And James, don t forget our pals at... http://www.audioroundtable.com/ and... http://lonestarbottleheads.org/ and... http://www.audiocircle.com/circles/ jim...
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 31, 2007
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        And James, don't forget our pals at...

        http://www.audioroundtable.com/

        and... http://lonestarbottleheads.org/

        and...
        http://www.audiocircle.com/circles/
        jim...

        --- In dallasaudioclub@yahoogroups.com, James Dolan <shrinkboy99@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > welcome, judy!! i am sure you'll get some interesting responses.
        also, i would like to invite you to have a look at
        www.audiokarma.org. i think you will learn much there, and we always
        like to see girls join up
        >
        >
        > ----- Original Message ----
        > From: judy ross <judyegr@...>
        > To: dallasaudioclub@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Wednesday, January 31, 2007 6:34:55 AM
        > Subject: [dallasaudioclub] Midland hello
        >
        > Hi all. I'm new here. I am a record collector.
        >
        > I have recently decided to dust them off and start playing them
        > again after 20 years of CD's. I got a turntable/AM/ FM, 8-track
        with
        > rollabout speakers from Goodwill which works great except for the 8-
        > track sticking a bit. (I do have 8-track tapes:Bob Seger,Neil
        > Diamond, and other Greats.)
        >
        > Then, last week I got a LLoyd's 65" stereo console. It's a 1973
        > model...you know....the old 'shake-the-walls' type with woofers
        that
        > will knock you down. Only thing, the turntable is stuck, frozen,
        > jammed. I am teaching myself how to repair it by taking one part
        off
        > at a time to see how it is made. I am NOT an electrician, but I AM
        a
        > mechanic. I am learning a bit at a time. So far I have learned that
        > there are two kinds of turntables.. .belt driven and gear driven. I
        > haven't found a belt on this one yet, and it is not shown on the
        > schematics. (Yes, the schematics and manual were actually inside it
        > when I got it...paid 25 dollars at Salvation Army!)
        >
        > I now have a record-to-computer- to-CD system, but have not fully
        > started using it yet. I will be categorizing and alphabetizing my
        > records the last of March when I get a room ready for them.(I have
        > quite a few thousand.)
        >
        > My goal is to be able to assemble/disassembl e components and
        repair
        > them someday. I was once a good mechanic who gave up when the
        > electronic ignition came into use. Now I am determined to learn the
        > basics...how to use a tester and a soldering iron.
        >
        > I'm wondering what kind of music the majority here listen to. My
        > favorites are classic rock, new age, and oldies...but I collect it
        > all.
        >
        > Judy Ross-Midland
        >
      • judy ross
        ... I still haven t been able to get this table off. It can t be welded on or they wouldn t have put a lockpin on it. Will it hurt it if I put some oil in
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 1, 2007
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          > ----- Original Message ----
          > From: judy ross <judyegr@...>
          >>
          > > Diamond, and other Greats.)
          >
          > . Only thing, the turntable is stuck, frozen,
          > jammed. I am teaching myself how to repair it by taking one part off
          > at a time to see how it is made. >

          I still haven't been able to get this table off. It can't be welded on
          or they wouldn't have put a lockpin on it. Will it hurt it if I put
          some oil in the center to see if it will help remove it? I can't see
          under the table from the top, and I can't see what is directly under it
          from the underside, either. Jeesh! If it were a car, I would get a
          wheel puller and put some UMPHH on it! I'm trying to resist that ploy
          for one with more finesse. Is there a trick to pulling this thing off?
          WHEW!
          Judy
        • Dennis
          Judy, I have taken more turntables out of consoles than I care to remember. To make communication easier let s use some common nomencalture. Let s call the
          Message 4 of 8 , Feb 1, 2007
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            Judy,

            I have taken more turntables out of consoles than I care to remember.
            To make communication easier let's use some common nomencalture.

            Let's call the wood panel the turntabe assembly is bolted on the
            plinth. The round disk that rotates is called a platter. The rubber
            disk on top of the platter is called a mat. The metal base the
            platter sits on is called the chassis.

            If you are having problems removing the chassis from the plinth, it
            might be easier to tilt console so the front rests on a carpaet. It
            makes it easier to get at the hardware holding the chassis to the
            plinth. The first thing you do is dsiconnect the signal and power
            wires that connect to the turntable chassis. In some cases there are
            connectors in some cases they need to be unsoldered. Draw a picture
            showing what color wire goes where so you can re-connect them
            properly. Some cahssis are spring loaded, some are fixes. But there
            will be three or four threaded studs with hex nuts holding it in. I
            always spray Kroil or Liquid Wrench on them adn wait a day to make
            sure I don't strip them.

            If you are trying to remove the platter from the chassis, that can be
            more of a challenge. Most console turntables have automatic changers
            with a 45 adapter. Teh platters were diecast metal usually aluminum
            and the changer mechanism is plated steel. Galvanic corrosion
            can "weld" the platter to the mechanism. Kroil mith help and you need
            to try it, but if it doesn't you need to use a propane torch to heat
            the platter. Remember these tables are sually driven by a rubber
            idler wheel or in rare cases a rubber belt. Keep the heat away from
            them. Remove the rubber mat and heat the top of the platter at the
            center. You can use a putty knife to gently try to pry the platter
            off. Wind masking tape arounf the putty knoe blade to prevent
            scratches.

            Like cars, vintage audio equipment has service manuals too. They will
            usually provide blow-up drawings of the assemblies, schematics and
            voltages. Do a google search for SAMS manuals and one the sirte
            search for your specific brand and model, there is a very good cahnce
            there is a SAMS for it.

            I am under the assumption that the colsole plays music adn the
            problem is just with teh turntable. In addition to soundign great,
            when soemthing does go wrong, it is usally a bad tube which is easily
            replaced. But eventaully, when it ahppens, someone wil have to
            measure the voltages in the amplifiers to find out whats wrong. The
            SAMS will have the information, but you need some basic tools and
            knowledge to fix it. The best Basic Electronics Technician manuals
            are the old Military manuals from the 50s. Once again easily found in
            a Google search. Since you are already a mechanic, it's a short jump
            to becoming a technician.

            Best Regards, Dennis


            --- In dallasaudioclub@yahoogroups.com, "judy ross" <judyegr@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > > ----- Original Message ----
            > > From: judy ross <judyegr@>
            > >>
            > > > Diamond, and other Greats.)
            > >
            > > . Only thing, the turntable is stuck, frozen,
            > > jammed. I am teaching myself how to repair it by taking one part
            off
            > > at a time to see how it is made. >
            >
            > I still haven't been able to get this table off. It can't be
            welded on
            > or they wouldn't have put a lockpin on it. Will it hurt it if I
            put
            > some oil in the center to see if it will help remove it? I can't
            see
            > under the table from the top, and I can't see what is directly
            under it
            > from the underside, either. Jeesh! If it were a car, I would get a
            > wheel puller and put some UMPHH on it! I'm trying to resist that
            ploy
            > for one with more finesse. Is there a trick to pulling this thing
            off?
            > WHEW!
            > Judy
            >
          • judy ross
            Wow, Jim...these are really great links. I have already gazed over them enough to know what and where to go for soldering tips (not the actual TIPS for the
            Message 5 of 8 , Feb 1, 2007
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              Wow, Jim...these are really great links. I have already gazed over
              them enough to know what and where to go for soldering tips (not the
              actual TIPS for the guns, but the hints...you know), and found some
              guys who don't know that the guy called Sundance Head who tried out for
              American Idol is the son of Roy Head of R&B fame in the 60's (see
              http://www.tsimon.com/head.htm). I also found one guy on the 1st site
              recommended who has the same problem that I have...his turntable is
              stuck! This was posted in 2005, so he has probably had time to get
              dynamite under it by now. I have been reading for hours. I finally
              figured out that DIY is not a brand....DUH! I have been DIYing for
              years! Whoa, guys..don't make fun of me unless you can make a boning
              stroke with India ink while doing Japanese writing.
              Thanks,
              Judy :)

              --- In dallasaudioclub@yahoogroups.com, "Jim" <jim@...> wrote:
              >
              > And James, don't forget our pals at...
              >
              > http://www.audioroundtable.com/
              >
              > and... http://lonestarbottleheads.org/
              >
              > and...
              > http://www.audiocircle.com/circles/
              > jim...
              >
              >
            • judy ross
              Hey, Dennis. I am devoting this day to your suggestions. Remembering what wire goes where should be a breeze. That s the same technique I used when removing
              Message 6 of 8 , Feb 1, 2007
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                Hey, Dennis. I am devoting this day to your suggestions.
                Remembering what wire goes where should be a breeze. That's the same
                technique I used when removing wires from plugs and distribitor
                caps. Ok. Since my current problem is removing the platter from the
                chassis, I have put oil (all I have is 3M at the moment) into the
                center. The spindle and mat are removed. I have tape to cover a
                prying instrument. If I can't get an instrument inside the plinth
                with enough room left for prying, then I will remove the chassis from
                the plinth. (Ahhh, a new language.) Plinth...such a neat word,
                never used it before. Be back later.
                Judy

                --- In dallasaudioclub@yahoogroups.com, "Dennis" <chimeraone@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Judy,
                >
                > I have taken more turntables out of consoles than I care to
                remember.
                > To make communication easier let's use some common nomencalture.
                >
                > Let's call the wood panel the turntabe assembly is bolted on the
                > plinth. The round disk that rotates is called a platter. The rubber
                > disk on top of the platter is called a mat. The metal base the
                > platter sits on is called the chassis.
                >
                > If you are having problems removing the chassis from the plinth, it
                > might be easier to tilt console so the front rests on a carpaet. It
                > makes it easier to get at the hardware holding the chassis to the
                > plinth. The first thing you do is dsiconnect the signal and power
                > wires that connect to the turntable chassis. In some cases there
                are
                > connectors in some cases they need to be unsoldered. Draw a picture
                > showing what color wire goes where so you can re-connect them
                > properly. Some cahssis are spring loaded, some are fixes. But there
                > will be three or four threaded studs with hex nuts holding it in. I
                > always spray Kroil or Liquid Wrench on them adn wait a day to make
                > sure I don't strip them.
                >
                > If you are trying to remove the platter from the chassis, that can
                be
                > more of a challenge. Most console turntables have automatic
                changers
                > with a 45 adapter. Teh platters were diecast metal usually aluminum
                > and the changer mechanism is plated steel. Galvanic corrosion
                > can "weld" the platter to the mechanism. Kroil mith help and you
                need
                > to try it, but if it doesn't you need to use a propane torch to
                heat
                > the platter. Remember these tables are sually driven by a rubber
                > idler wheel or in rare cases a rubber belt. Keep the heat away from
                > them. Remove the rubber mat and heat the top of the platter at the
                > center. You can use a putty knife to gently try to pry the platter
                > off. Wind masking tape arounf the putty knoe blade to prevent
                > scratches.
                >
                > Like cars, vintage audio equipment has service manuals too. They
                will
                > usually provide blow-up drawings of the assemblies, schematics and
                > voltages. Do a google search for SAMS manuals and one the sirte
                > search for your specific brand and model, there is a very good
                cahnce
                > there is a SAMS for it.
                >
                > I am under the assumption that the colsole plays music adn the
                > problem is just with teh turntable. In addition to soundign great,
                > when soemthing does go wrong, it is usally a bad tube which is
                easily
                > replaced. But eventaully, when it ahppens, someone wil have to
                > measure the voltages in the amplifiers to find out whats wrong. The
                > SAMS will have the information, but you need some basic tools and
                > knowledge to fix it. The best Basic Electronics Technician manuals
                > are the old Military manuals from the 50s. Once again easily found
                in
                > a Google search. Since you are already a mechanic, it's a short
                jump
                > to becoming a technician.
                >
                > Best Regards, Dennis
                >
                >
                > --- In dallasaudioclub@yahoogroups.com, "judy ross" <judyegr@>
                > wrote:
                > >
                > > > ----- Original Message ----
                > > > From: judy ross <judyegr@>
                > > >>
                > > > > Diamond, and other Greats.)
                > > >
                > > > . Only thing, the turntable is stuck, frozen,
                > > > jammed. I am teaching myself how to repair it by taking one
                part
                > off
                > > > at a time to see how it is made. >
                > >
                > > I still haven't been able to get this table off. It can't be
                > welded on
                > > or they wouldn't have put a lockpin on it. Will it hurt it if I
                > put
                > > some oil in the center to see if it will help remove it? I can't
                > see
                > > under the table from the top, and I can't see what is directly
                > under it
                > > from the underside, either. Jeesh! If it were a car, I would get
                a
                > > wheel puller and put some UMPHH on it! I'm trying to resist that
                > ploy
                > > for one with more finesse. Is there a trick to pulling this
                thing
                > off?
                > > WHEW!
                > > Judy
                > >
                >
              • Dennis
                It sounds like you might have a frozen bearing. They were usually bronze with lithium grease or oil for lubrication. A lot of console manufacturers used
                Message 7 of 8 , Feb 1, 2007
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                  It sounds like you might have a frozen bearing. They were usually
                  bronze with lithium grease or oil for lubrication.

                  A lot of console manufacturers used Garrard turntables and they were
                  considered the best. It's a lot easier to find parts for them and the
                  changer types are available for little or no money.

                  If you deceide you want to put in a "superior engine", post it here.
                  I have a friend who goes to all the estate sales and if he buys a
                  console for th espeqakers and amps, he just throws them away. I am
                  sure the DAC members can help you out.

                  Whenever I work on vintage audio equipment I always wear a white shop
                  coat, like a doctors, to get me in the proper frame of mind. It helps
                  reduce the impulse reach for a hammer.

                  --- In dallasaudioclub@yahoogroups.com, "judy ross" <judyegr@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > Hey, Dennis. I am devoting this day to your suggestions.
                  > Remembering what wire goes where should be a breeze. That's the
                  same
                  > technique I used when removing wires from plugs and distribitor
                  > caps. Ok. Since my current problem is removing the platter from
                  the
                  > chassis, I have put oil (all I have is 3M at the moment) into the
                  > center. The spindle and mat are removed. I have tape to cover a
                  > prying instrument. If I can't get an instrument inside the plinth
                  > with enough room left for prying, then I will remove the chassis
                  from
                  > the plinth. (Ahhh, a new language.) Plinth...such a neat word,
                  > never used it before. Be back later.
                  > Judy
                  >
                  > --- In dallasaudioclub@yahoogroups.com, "Dennis" <chimeraone@>
                  > wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Judy,
                  > >
                  > > I have taken more turntables out of consoles than I care to
                  > remember.
                  > > To make communication easier let's use some common nomencalture.
                  > >
                  > > Let's call the wood panel the turntabe assembly is bolted on the
                  > > plinth. The round disk that rotates is called a platter. The
                  rubber
                  > > disk on top of the platter is called a mat. The metal base the
                  > > platter sits on is called the chassis.
                  > >
                  > > If you are having problems removing the chassis from the plinth,
                  it
                  > > might be easier to tilt console so the front rests on a carpaet.
                  It
                  > > makes it easier to get at the hardware holding the chassis to the
                  > > plinth. The first thing you do is dsiconnect the signal and power
                  > > wires that connect to the turntable chassis. In some cases there
                  > are
                  > > connectors in some cases they need to be unsoldered. Draw a
                  picture
                  > > showing what color wire goes where so you can re-connect them
                  > > properly. Some cahssis are spring loaded, some are fixes. But
                  there
                  > > will be three or four threaded studs with hex nuts holding it in.
                  I
                  > > always spray Kroil or Liquid Wrench on them adn wait a day to
                  make
                  > > sure I don't strip them.
                  > >
                  > > If you are trying to remove the platter from the chassis, that
                  can
                  > be
                  > > more of a challenge. Most console turntables have automatic
                  > changers
                  > > with a 45 adapter. Teh platters were diecast metal usually
                  aluminum
                  > > and the changer mechanism is plated steel. Galvanic corrosion
                  > > can "weld" the platter to the mechanism. Kroil mith help and you
                  > need
                  > > to try it, but if it doesn't you need to use a propane torch to
                  > heat
                  > > the platter. Remember these tables are sually driven by a rubber
                  > > idler wheel or in rare cases a rubber belt. Keep the heat away
                  from
                  > > them. Remove the rubber mat and heat the top of the platter at
                  the
                  > > center. You can use a putty knife to gently try to pry the
                  platter
                  > > off. Wind masking tape arounf the putty knoe blade to prevent
                  > > scratches.
                  > >
                  > > Like cars, vintage audio equipment has service manuals too. They
                  > will
                  > > usually provide blow-up drawings of the assemblies, schematics
                  and
                  > > voltages. Do a google search for SAMS manuals and one the sirte
                  > > search for your specific brand and model, there is a very good
                  > cahnce
                  > > there is a SAMS for it.
                  > >
                  > > I am under the assumption that the colsole plays music adn the
                  > > problem is just with teh turntable. In addition to soundign
                  great,
                  > > when soemthing does go wrong, it is usally a bad tube which is
                  > easily
                  > > replaced. But eventaully, when it ahppens, someone wil have to
                  > > measure the voltages in the amplifiers to find out whats wrong.
                  The
                  > > SAMS will have the information, but you need some basic tools and
                  > > knowledge to fix it. The best Basic Electronics Technician
                  manuals
                  > > are the old Military manuals from the 50s. Once again easily
                  found
                  > in
                  > > a Google search. Since you are already a mechanic, it's a short
                  > jump
                  > > to becoming a technician.
                  > >
                  > > Best Regards, Dennis
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > --- In dallasaudioclub@yahoogroups.com, "judy ross" <judyegr@>
                  > > wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > > ----- Original Message ----
                  > > > > From: judy ross <judyegr@>
                  > > > >>
                  > > > > > Diamond, and other Greats.)
                  > > > >
                  > > > > . Only thing, the turntable is stuck, frozen,
                  > > > > jammed. I am teaching myself how to repair it by taking one
                  > part
                  > > off
                  > > > > at a time to see how it is made. >
                  > > >
                  > > > I still haven't been able to get this table off. It can't be
                  > > welded on
                  > > > or they wouldn't have put a lockpin on it. Will it hurt it if
                  I
                  > > put
                  > > > some oil in the center to see if it will help remove it? I
                  can't
                  > > see
                  > > > under the table from the top, and I can't see what is directly
                  > > under it
                  > > > from the underside, either. Jeesh! If it were a car, I would
                  get
                  > a
                  > > > wheel puller and put some UMPHH on it! I'm trying to resist
                  that
                  > > ploy
                  > > > for one with more finesse. Is there a trick to pulling this
                  > thing
                  > > off?
                  > > > WHEW!
                  > > > Judy
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
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