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Re: [cyef] question about playgrounds in childcare centers / preschools

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  • Enid Elliot
    Sue herrington at university of british columbia has done work in this area.... susan herrington look for her articles or email her.
    Message 1 of 22 , May 19, 2010
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      Sue herrington at university of british columbia has done work in this
      area.... susan herrington <susan.herrington@...> look for her articles or
      email her. Would be interested in hearing more about your work. I am working
      with child care programs here in british columbia to create more natural
      settings outside.

      enid elliot, phd
      117 menzies street
      victoria, bc
      v8v 1k5
      250-386-9326
      250-386-9328 (fax)

      "For once a story is told, it cannot be called back. Once told, it is loose
      in the world...So you have to be careful with the stories you tell. And you
      have to watch out for the stories you are told." Tom King

      http://www.sunypress.edu/details.asp?id=61365



      From: Ine van Liempd <ine@...>
      Reply-To: <cyef@yahoogroups.com>
      Date: Tue, 18 May 2010 17:06:32 +0200
      To: <cyef@yahoogroups.com>
      Subject: [cyef] question about playgrounds in childcare centers / preschools






      Dear all,

      I am currently writing a book with guidelines for building childcare
      centers / preschools. In the Netherlands there are some standards for
      the amount of indoor- and outdoor play areas. Those for the outdoors are
      very low: you need to have 3 sqm. per child as a minimum. But currently
      this minimum standard tends to become THE standard, which means that a
      new childcare center for for example 40 children has a playground of
      only 120 sqm.
      We have done research in this area in 2004 and found that at least 7
      sqm. per child is needed if you want to make a playground with enough
      variety, where children will not bump into eachother all the time.
      Now I am wondering if anyone else recently did research on this subject.
      And if so, what were the outcomes about the size of a good playground. I
      would like to be able to support my point (you need to double the
      minimum standard) with other than my own research. Or maybe there are
      researches with quite different outcomes, that would of course also be
      very interesting.

      Hope there is someone out there who can help me find similar
      researchfindings!

      Kind regards,

      Drs. Ine van Liempd
      AKTA, onderzoeks- en adviesbureau voor ruimtegebruik

      Postbus 13297
      3507 LG Utrecht
      030 271 0558
      e-mail: inevanliempd@akta <mailto:inevanliempd@akta> .nl
      <outbind://49/www.akta.nl>

      www.akta.nl <http://www.akta.nl/>

      De informatie opgenomen in dit bericht is vertrouwelijk en is
      uitsluitend bestemd voor de geadresseerde. Indien u dit bericht
      onterecht ontvangt, wordt u verzocht de inhoud niet te gebruiken, te
      vernietigen en de afzender direct te informeren via bovenstaand
      e-mailadres dan wel via 030-2710558.

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Tim Gill
      Ine My understanding is there here in England, there are no minimum standards for outdoor space in childcare/early years provision. In other words, services
      Message 2 of 22 , Jun 1, 2010
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        Ine

        My understanding is there here in England, there are no minimum standards
        for outdoor space in childcare/early years provision. In other words,
        services can be provided from premises that have no dedicated outdoor space.
        The regulatory/licensing arrangements may require that services show they
        can access suitable outdoor space nearby (eg a park or public play area) - I
        am unclear about this. The situation may be different in Wales, Scotland and
        Northern Ireland, where there are different regulatory frameworks.

        If you want to find out more I suggest you contact the Children's Play
        Information Service at the National Children's Bureau here in London - check
        its website www.ncb.org.uk/cpis

        Best wishes

        Tim

        Tim Gill
        www.rethinkingchildhood.com

        -----Original Message-----
        From: cyef@yahoogroups.com [mailto:cyef@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Ine van
        Liempd
        Sent: 25 May 2010 14:50
        To: cyef@yahoogroups.com; ine
        Subject: RE: [cyef] question about playgrounds in childcare centers /
        preschools
        Importance: High



        Thanks everyone,
        I do now have data from Australia, USA, New Zealand, Iceland, Sweden and
        Norway. Thank you for all your help. It turns out the differences are huge,
        but my own country is definitely dangling at the bottom. Now I do realise
        that the Netherlands are rather densely populated in comparison to the toher
        countries mentioned above. So I would be interested to hear if there are
        people who know about countries a bit more comparible, for instance Northern
        Italy, West-Germany, parts of England? And what about the big cities like
        New York: does anyone know if the NAEYC standard is practice there too?

        I will try to make an overview of all the information sent to me. If
        anyone interested, please let me know so I can send it to you.

        Thanks again,

        Ine van Liempd.

        ________________________________

        Van: cyef@yahoogroups.com [mailto:cyef@yahoogroups.com] Namens Fiona Robbe
        Verzonden: dinsdag 25 mei 2010 15:31
        Aan: ine
        Onderwerp: RE: [cyef] question about playgrounds in childcare centers /
        preschools

        In our State of new south Wales in Australia we have a very interesting
        set
        of figures. Government legislation requires us to have 7 square metres of
        unencumbered outdoor space per child. This is regarded as a minimum, not a
        maximum. A more realistic set of guidelines are provided by the Australian
        Early Childhood Association as follows:

        75 place centre: 15 square metres per child

        40 place centre: 20 square metres per child

        25 place centre: 25 square metres per child

        These later figures are regarded as best practice, but it is broadly
        acknowledged that this is not possible in tight constrained sites.

        Hope this may help

        Fiona Robbé AILA

        Registered Landscape Architect & Horticulturist

        Fiona Robbé Landscape Architects
        108 Arcadia Road, ARCADIA NSW 2159
        Tel: (02) 9653 1045 Fax: (02) 9653 1229
        Email: fiona@...
        <mailto:fiona%40architectsofarcadia.com.au>

        IMPORTANT NOTICE
        This email and any attachments may be confidential and also privileged. If
        you are not the intended recipient please notify the sender and delete all
        copies of this transmission immediately, along with any attachments. You
        should not copy it or use it for any purpose, nor disclose its contents to
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        _____

        From: cyef@yahoogroups.com <mailto:cyef%40yahoogroups.com>
        [mailto:cyef@yahoogroups.com <mailto:cyef%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of
        Ine
        van Liempd
        Sent: Wednesday, 19 May 2010 1:07 AM
        To: cyef@yahoogroups.com <mailto:cyef%40yahoogroups.com>
        Subject: [cyef] question about playgrounds in childcare centers /
        preschools

        Dear all,

        I am currently writing a book with guidelines for building childcare
        centers / preschools. In the Netherlands there are some standards for
        the amount of indoor- and outdoor play areas. Those for the outdoors are
        very low: you need to have 3 sqm. per child as a minimum. But currently
        this minimum standard tends to become THE standard, which means that a
        new childcare center for for example 40 children has a playground of
        only 120 sqm.
        We have done research in this area in 2004 and found that at least 7
        sqm. per child is needed if you want to make a playground with enough
        variety, where children will not bump into eachother all the time.
        Now I am wondering if anyone else recently did research on this subject.
        And if so, what were the outcomes about the size of a good playground. I
        would like to be able to support my point (you need to double the
        minimum standard) with other than my own research. Or maybe there are
        researches with quite different outcomes, that would of course also be
        very interesting.

        Hope there is someone out there who can help me find similar
        researchfindings!

        Kind regards,

        Drs. Ine van Liempd
        AKTA, onderzoeks- en adviesbureau voor ruimtegebruik

        Postbus 13297
        3507 LG Utrecht
        030 271 0558
        e-mail: inevanliempd@akta <mailto:inevanliempd@akta> .nl
        <outbind://49/www.akta.nl>

        www.akta.nl <http://www.akta.nl/>

        De informatie opgenomen in dit bericht is vertrouwelijk en is
        uitsluitend bestemd voor de geadresseerde. Indien u dit bericht
        onterecht ontvangt, wordt u verzocht de inhoud niet te gebruiken, te
        vernietigen en de afzender direct te informeren via bovenstaand
        e-mailadres dan wel via 030-2710558.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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