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Re: [cyef] Most child-friendly neighborhoods

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  • Illene Susan Pevec
    You can also look at Vancouver, BC Commercial Drive area: the results of redesigning the school grounds at Grandview/U Quinak uuh Elementary School in
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 1, 2008
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      You can also look at Vancouver, BC Commercial Drive area: the results of redesigning the school grounds at Grandview/U'Quinak'uuh Elementary School in Vancouver, BC. This area was formerly used for soliciting CHILDREN into prostitution, now hosts school and community gardens, an ethnobotanic garden and a traditional longhouse for community ceremonies. Community includes the Mosaic Creek bike pathway and Mosaic Creek Park as well as a huge Britannia community center with children's programming. The area has very mixed urban use and mixed demographics with a lot of street life and many people on foot and a major urban transportation hub. I wrote my MA thesis on the garden transformations at Grandview, happy to send it, but it is now 8 years old and many things have happened in the community since.
      Illene Pevec

      ---- Original message ----
      >Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2008 08:23:46 -0700
      >From: "Valerie Fronczek" <ipacommunications@...>
      >Subject: Re: [cyef] Most child-friendly neighborhoods
      >To: <cyef@yahoogroups.com>
      >
      > False Creek, south side, Vancouver, Canada.
      > VF
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Sharon E. Sutton
      > To: cyef@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Wednesday, July 30, 2008 7:33 AM
      > Subject: Re: [cyef] Most child-friendly
      > neighborhoods
      >
      > Take a look at Seattle Center.
      >
      > On Jul 30, 2008, at 6:37 AM, amyv1066 wrote:
      >
      > > Hi all,
      > > I am working on a series of case studies, examing
      > the effects of urban
      > > design on children. I am looking for
      > recommendations for
      > > neighborhoods/communities that are well-designed
      > for children/youth.
      > > Any thoughts? I am looking at a very detailed
      > analysis of the urban
      > > form, not a broad brush sociological survey, so
      > the more specific you
      > > can be, the better. For example, Amsterdam would
      > be way too broad,
      > > though it might be a perfectly delightful place.
      > The areas I have
      > > already studies are approximately 600 acres in
      > size. I am hoping to
      > > find a variety of urban/suburban/rural forms so
      > that I can compare
      > > diffferent aspects.
      > > Thanks so much for your help,
      > > Amy Lindsey
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      > ****************************************
      > Dr. Sharon E. Sutton, FAIA
      > Professor, Department of Architecture
      > Adjunct Professor, School of Social Work
      > Director, Center for Environment Education and
      > Design Studies
      > 208P Gould Hall Box 355720 University of Washington
      > 98195-5720
      > 206.685.3361 (wk) 206.616.4992 (fax) 206.383.6052
      > (cell)
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been
      > removed]
      >
      >
    • Susanna
      You might consider Greenbelt, Maryland. Here are some links: Virtual Greenbelt: http://otal.umd.edu/~vg/ Greenbelt, Maryland, USA http://www.greenbelt.com/
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 1, 2008
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        You might consider Greenbelt, Maryland. Here are some links:

        Virtual Greenbelt:
        http://otal.umd.edu/~vg/

        Greenbelt, Maryland, USA
        http://www.greenbelt.com/

        Greenbelt Museum
        http://www.greenbeltmuseum.org/


        I live pretty near Greenbelt, but I only just recently visited and
        walked around in it for the first time. It's really unlike any town
        I've seen, and particularly child-friendly. (It really does look as
        idyllic as it sounds from the descriptions on the websites)

        It has an interesting history. Here's a quote from the Greenbelt museum site:

        "Greenbelt Maryland is a planned community born out of the Great
        Depression of the 1930s...constructed to provide work relief for the
        unemployed, provide affordable housing for low income workers, and be
        a model for future town planning in America."

        "Pedestrian walkways wound through the interior of superblocks. Three
        underpasses provided walkways under the main roads. All of the
        businesses were located in a mall in the center of town within easy
        walking distance. A combined elementary school and community center
        and the recreation facilities were all centrally located. Greenbelt
        was truly a utopian dream come true. It provided an ideal
        environment for families; a healthful and beautiful community with
        playgrounds, public art, a swimming pool and walkways safe from
        traffic"

        Susanna
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