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RE: [SPAM][cyef] Most child-friendly neighborhoods

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  • Tim Gill
    Amy My vote goes to Freiburg, a German city near the French and Swiss borders, which has for decades been pursuing a comprehensive green/child-friendly
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 5, 2008
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      Amy

      My vote goes to Freiburg, a German city near the French and Swiss borders,
      which has for decades been pursuing a comprehensive green/child-friendly
      planning and transport agenda. Having visited in 2005, I could go on at some
      length about the public transport, walking/cycling networks, naturalistic
      play areas, people-friendly residential streets and squares etc etc. The
      results prove beyond doubt that a child-friendly neighbourhood looks like a
      sustainable neighbourhood - something I never tire of pointing out to both
      children's advocates and environmentalists. The whole city may be too big
      for your purposes, in which case I suggest homing in on Vauban, an acclaimed
      new development on an ex army base on the outskirts of the city, and
      Rieselfeld, another large development area. All the above features are there
      in spades, and Vauban is also interesting because, as I understand, it was
      developed in close cooperation with interested citizen groups.

      Google Freiburg Vauban / Freiburg Rieselfeld and you'll find lots of images
      and articles.

      Best wishes

      Tim

      Tim Gill
      www.rethinkingchildhood.com
      -----Original Message-----
      From: cyef@yahoogroups.com [mailto:cyef@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of
      amyv1066
      Sent: 30 July 2008 14:38
      To: cyef@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [SPAM][cyef] Most child-friendly neighborhoods


      Hi all,
      I am working on a series of case studies, examing the effects of urban
      design on children. I am looking for recommendations for
      neighborhoods/communities that are well-designed for children/youth.
      Any thoughts? I am looking at a very detailed analysis of the urban
      form, not a broad brush sociological survey, so the more specific you
      can be, the better. For example, Amsterdam would be way too broad,
      though it might be a perfectly delightful place. The areas I have
      already studies are approximately 600 acres in size. I am hoping to
      find a variety of urban/suburban/rural forms so that I can compare
      diffferent aspects.
      Thanks so much for your help,
      Amy Lindsey






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Gary Moore
      Amy, good choice. But there is another small city more in the north central part of Germany (name escapes me right now) that has also had a long and rich
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 5, 2008
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        Amy, good choice. But there is another small city more in the north
        central part of Germany (name escapes me right now) that has also had a
        long and rich history of child friendliness in design. Does anyone
        remember it's name?



        regards



        gary



        ________________________________

        From: cyef@yahoogroups.com [mailto:cyef@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
        Tim Gill
        Sent: Wednesday, 6 August 2008 6:35 AM
        To: cyef@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: RE: [SPAM][cyef] Most child-friendly neighborhoods



        Amy

        My vote goes to Freiburg, a German city near the French and Swiss
        borders,
        which has for decades been pursuing a comprehensive green/child-friendly
        planning and transport agenda. Having visited in 2005, I could go on at
        some
        length about the public transport, walking/cycling networks,
        naturalistic
        play areas, people-friendly residential streets and squares etc etc. The
        results prove beyond doubt that a child-friendly neighbourhood looks
        like a
        sustainable neighbourhood - something I never tire of pointing out to
        both
        children's advocates and environmentalists. The whole city may be too
        big
        for your purposes, in which case I suggest homing in on Vauban, an
        acclaimed
        new development on an ex army base on the outskirts of the city, and
        Rieselfeld, another large development area. All the above features are
        there
        in spades, and Vauban is also interesting because, as I understand, it
        was
        developed in close cooperation with interested citizen groups.

        Google Freiburg Vauban / Freiburg Rieselfeld and you'll find lots of
        images
        and articles.

        Best wishes

        Tim

        Tim Gill
        www.rethinkingchildhood.com
        -----Original Message-----
        From: cyef@yahoogroups.com <mailto:cyef%40yahoogroups.com>
        [mailto:cyef@yahoogroups.com <mailto:cyef%40yahoogroups.com> ]On Behalf
        Of
        amyv1066
        Sent: 30 July 2008 14:38
        To: cyef@yahoogroups.com <mailto:cyef%40yahoogroups.com>
        Subject: [SPAM][cyef] Most child-friendly neighborhoods

        Hi all,
        I am working on a series of case studies, examing the effects of urban
        design on children. I am looking for recommendations for
        neighborhoods/communities that are well-designed for children/youth.
        Any thoughts? I am looking at a very detailed analysis of the urban
        form, not a broad brush sociological survey, so the more specific you
        can be, the better. For example, Amsterdam would be way too broad,
        though it might be a perfectly delightful place. The areas I have
        already studies are approximately 600 acres in size. I am hoping to
        find a variety of urban/suburban/rural forms so that I can compare
        diffferent aspects.
        Thanks so much for your help,
        Amy Lindsey

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Illene Susan Pevec
        You can also look at Vancouver, BC Commercial Drive area: the results of redesigning the school grounds at Grandview/U Quinak uuh Elementary School in
        Message 3 of 9 , Sep 1, 2008
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          You can also look at Vancouver, BC Commercial Drive area: the results of redesigning the school grounds at Grandview/U'Quinak'uuh Elementary School in Vancouver, BC. This area was formerly used for soliciting CHILDREN into prostitution, now hosts school and community gardens, an ethnobotanic garden and a traditional longhouse for community ceremonies. Community includes the Mosaic Creek bike pathway and Mosaic Creek Park as well as a huge Britannia community center with children's programming. The area has very mixed urban use and mixed demographics with a lot of street life and many people on foot and a major urban transportation hub. I wrote my MA thesis on the garden transformations at Grandview, happy to send it, but it is now 8 years old and many things have happened in the community since.
          Illene Pevec

          ---- Original message ----
          >Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2008 08:23:46 -0700
          >From: "Valerie Fronczek" <ipacommunications@...>
          >Subject: Re: [cyef] Most child-friendly neighborhoods
          >To: <cyef@yahoogroups.com>
          >
          > False Creek, south side, Vancouver, Canada.
          > VF
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: Sharon E. Sutton
          > To: cyef@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Wednesday, July 30, 2008 7:33 AM
          > Subject: Re: [cyef] Most child-friendly
          > neighborhoods
          >
          > Take a look at Seattle Center.
          >
          > On Jul 30, 2008, at 6:37 AM, amyv1066 wrote:
          >
          > > Hi all,
          > > I am working on a series of case studies, examing
          > the effects of urban
          > > design on children. I am looking for
          > recommendations for
          > > neighborhoods/communities that are well-designed
          > for children/youth.
          > > Any thoughts? I am looking at a very detailed
          > analysis of the urban
          > > form, not a broad brush sociological survey, so
          > the more specific you
          > > can be, the better. For example, Amsterdam would
          > be way too broad,
          > > though it might be a perfectly delightful place.
          > The areas I have
          > > already studies are approximately 600 acres in
          > size. I am hoping to
          > > find a variety of urban/suburban/rural forms so
          > that I can compare
          > > diffferent aspects.
          > > Thanks so much for your help,
          > > Amy Lindsey
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          > ****************************************
          > Dr. Sharon E. Sutton, FAIA
          > Professor, Department of Architecture
          > Adjunct Professor, School of Social Work
          > Director, Center for Environment Education and
          > Design Studies
          > 208P Gould Hall Box 355720 University of Washington
          > 98195-5720
          > 206.685.3361 (wk) 206.616.4992 (fax) 206.383.6052
          > (cell)
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been
          > removed]
          >
          >
        • Susanna
          You might consider Greenbelt, Maryland. Here are some links: Virtual Greenbelt: http://otal.umd.edu/~vg/ Greenbelt, Maryland, USA http://www.greenbelt.com/
          Message 4 of 9 , Sep 1, 2008
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            You might consider Greenbelt, Maryland. Here are some links:

            Virtual Greenbelt:
            http://otal.umd.edu/~vg/

            Greenbelt, Maryland, USA
            http://www.greenbelt.com/

            Greenbelt Museum
            http://www.greenbeltmuseum.org/


            I live pretty near Greenbelt, but I only just recently visited and
            walked around in it for the first time. It's really unlike any town
            I've seen, and particularly child-friendly. (It really does look as
            idyllic as it sounds from the descriptions on the websites)

            It has an interesting history. Here's a quote from the Greenbelt museum site:

            "Greenbelt Maryland is a planned community born out of the Great
            Depression of the 1930s...constructed to provide work relief for the
            unemployed, provide affordable housing for low income workers, and be
            a model for future town planning in America."

            "Pedestrian walkways wound through the interior of superblocks. Three
            underpasses provided walkways under the main roads. All of the
            businesses were located in a mall in the center of town within easy
            walking distance. A combined elementary school and community center
            and the recreation facilities were all centrally located. Greenbelt
            was truly a utopian dream come true. It provided an ideal
            environment for families; a healthful and beautiful community with
            playgrounds, public art, a swimming pool and walkways safe from
            traffic"

            Susanna
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