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Re: Celtic Jutland

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  • Joseph S Crary
    Gaeso-rix, I just remembered about the Gaestae (directly translated as the Spear-men), however it actually meant the paladins, as in, have spear will travel.
    Message 1 of 45 , Jul 31, 2001
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      Gaeso-rix, I just remembered about the Gaestae (directly translated
      as the Spear-men), however it actually meant the paladins, as in,
      have spear will travel. However, there was a religious aspect as
      well. As you hinted, these Gaestae were associated with a Celt sky
      god who's symbol was the spear. There also was a test of piety
      though a test of arms. In several ways the Gaestae appear to be the
      forerunners of the crusaders.


      Gaes-rix king of the Gaestae

      would be a fitting celt name for a Cimbric war leader



      JS Crary
    • HÃ¥kan Lindgren
      Just a quick association - is the American magazine Utne Reader named after this word? Hakan
      Message 45 of 45 , Aug 14, 2001
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        Just a quick association - is the American magazine Utne Reader named after this word?

        Hakan


        > What is your source for this Anatolian term? I know Cyril Babarev
        > cites it in his online Luwian glossary, but again I don't know on
        > what authority. The normal Hittite term for "land, country" is <utne>.
        >
        > Piotr
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