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[cybalist] Cognates of Buddhist Terms

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  • ted.kloba@aquila.com
    I m looking for examples of Sanskrit or Pali Buddhist terms that have cognates in modern, non-indic languages. The first one that comes to mind is Sutra: Eng.:
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 8, 1999
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      I'm looking for examples of Sanskrit or Pali Buddhist terms that have
      cognates in modern, non-indic languages.

      The first one that comes to mind is Sutra:
      Eng.: sew
      Lith.: siulas, siuti

      I also wonder to what extent other such terms are based on Dravidian
      borrowings.

      Thanks,
      Ted
    • gpiotr@ifa.amu.edu.pl
      gpiot-@ifa.amu.edu.pl wrote: original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/cybalist/?start=8 ... *sj(e)uH sew is a well-known root, with cognates in most
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 8, 1999
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        gpiot-@... wrote: original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/cybalist/?start=8
        > I'm looking for examples of Sanskrit or Pali Buddhist terms that have > cognates in modern, non-indic languages. > > The first one that comes to mind is Sutra: > Eng.: sew > Lith.: siulas, siuti > > I also wonder to what extent other such terms are based on Dravidian > borrowings. > > Thanks, > Ted >
        *sj(e)uH 'sew' is a well-known root, with cognates in most branches of IE. The initial *sj- is occasionally simplified by j-dropping (more or less as in English suit), hence e.g. Latin su:tor 'cobbler' (in my own Polish, by the way, a cobbler is called szewc < sjuH-ik-o-s, and he sews is szyje < sjuH-je-ti). Sutra comes from suH-tro- or suH-tlo-, meaning 'something with which you can sew' > 'thread' > (metaphorically)'a string/list [of rules]'. No Dravidian influence here.Other well-known but quite spectacular equations include yoga = yoke = Gk. zygon = Slavic igo, related to Latin iung-, and therefore to join, junction (English via French). The title Buddha itself is purely IE, from *bheudh-'wake' and represents the derived adjective *bhudh-tos 'awakened', but you probably know that much. There are many Dravidian loanwords in learned Old Indic, too, e.g. paNDita 'educated', cf. Telugu paNDa 'knowledge' [capital letters here stand for postalveolar/retroflex consonants].Piotr
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