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RE: Re: Is Basque IE?

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  • dgkilday57
    Thank you. I would also like to thank Jim Rader, who sent a link to the Hubschmied paper via e-mail. I got an Error 404 when I attempted to reply with e-mail.
    Message 1 of 61 , Sep 22, 2013
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      Thank you.  I would also like to thank Jim Rader, who sent a link to the Hubschmied paper via e-mail.  I got an Error 404 when I attempted to reply with e-mail.


      DGK, top-posting by default



      --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, <cybalist@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

      Older issues of Vox Romanica are freely available for download, at least from where I am (Sweden).

      Anders

      DGKilday: "Your own etymology of _glo:ria_ does not involve Sievers. My problem is that I never heard of being "green with glory", so I find the route Gaulish *klovesja: (vel sim.) > Ligurian > Old Latin more plausible, as with _gladius_. However, in order to investigate this theory that initial Gaulish tenues became mediae when borrowed into Ligurian (which I now attribute to differences in initial consonant strength, NOT aspiration), I need to get a copy of J.U. Hubschmied's long paper on Late Gaulish in Vox Romanica vol. 3 from the university library. Once I get this paper, it may turn out that counter-examples kill my theory."
    • oalexandre
      [Tavi] However, there re some reare cases of Basque /r/ arising from gemination of /R/, as in larre meadow; heath; uncultivated land, desert , a loanword from
      Message 61 of 61 , Oct 21, 2013
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        [Tavi]
        However, there're some reare cases of Basque /r/ arising from gemination of /R/, as in larre 'meadow; heath; uncultivated land, desert', a loanword from Celtic (Gaulish) *landa: 'heath, moor' > *lanna > larra > larre.
        >
        That is, the shift /nn/ > /RR/ happened in Paleo-Basque.

        [DGK]
        But _landa_ 'campo, pieza de terreno' occurs widely in Basque (Bisc., Guip., Aezc., Lab., High & Low Nav., Ronc.) and appears to continue Gaul. *landa: directly. 
        >
        I think this is from a different Celtic word *landa: '(enclosed) field, plot of land', homonymous to Gaulish *landa: 'heath', Cornish lan, Breton lann 'heath, steppe', which would require a Celtic protoform *Flanda: (cfr. Gascon branda, brana 'heath'). Unfortunately, Celtic specialists conflated both.

        > Moreover a Late Gaul. *lanna would have given Bq. *lana, since Latin _anno:na_ gives Bq. _anoa_. 
        >
        Actually, nn > n isn't a Paleo-Basque but a Vasco-Romance development shared by Gascon, where we find lana.
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