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RE: RE: Re: Is Basque IE?

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  • oalexandre
    ... I told before, gizon is a straightforward loanword from Celtic (Gaulish) *gdonjo- man , so there s no place here for on good . Like Gianfranco, you
    Message 1 of 61 , Sep 7, 2013
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      > As
      I told before, gizon is a straightforward loanword from Celtic (Gaulish) *gdonjo- 'man', so there's no place here for on 'good'.
      >
      Like Gianfranco, you ignore what your simplistic theory cannot explain, namely the combining form _giza-_.
      >
      Simple. First, Basque gizon drops the final nasal, giving **gizo-, whose combinatory variant is regularly giza- (most nouns in -o and -e have combinatory variants in -a).

      Positing a compound from an extraterrestial *giza- and on 'good' does no good. Please notice this has nothing to do with the origin of the latter, which I agree it can't be Latin bonu-.
    • oalexandre
      [Tavi] However, there re some reare cases of Basque /r/ arising from gemination of /R/, as in larre meadow; heath; uncultivated land, desert , a loanword from
      Message 61 of 61 , Oct 21, 2013
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        [Tavi]
        However, there're some reare cases of Basque /r/ arising from gemination of /R/, as in larre 'meadow; heath; uncultivated land, desert', a loanword from Celtic (Gaulish) *landa: 'heath, moor' > *lanna > larra > larre.
        >
        That is, the shift /nn/ > /RR/ happened in Paleo-Basque.

        [DGK]
        But _landa_ 'campo, pieza de terreno' occurs widely in Basque (Bisc., Guip., Aezc., Lab., High & Low Nav., Ronc.) and appears to continue Gaul. *landa: directly. 
        >
        I think this is from a different Celtic word *landa: '(enclosed) field, plot of land', homonymous to Gaulish *landa: 'heath', Cornish lan, Breton lann 'heath, steppe', which would require a Celtic protoform *Flanda: (cfr. Gascon branda, brana 'heath'). Unfortunately, Celtic specialists conflated both.

        > Moreover a Late Gaul. *lanna would have given Bq. *lana, since Latin _anno:na_ gives Bq. _anoa_. 
        >
        Actually, nn > n isn't a Paleo-Basque but a Vasco-Romance development shared by Gascon, where we find lana.
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