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Re: Gorgyra and Tartaros - g/t dialectal Pre-Greek

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  • ufnkex
    ... NeoGreek gargara, gargariso German gurgeln (& Gurgel) Latin gurgulio (& gurgatio + gurgitare). BTW, Mongolians and some neighboring Turkic peoples call
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 1, 2013
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      >korkorugmos remembers onomatopoeic verbs like Portuguese gargalhar
      >"to laugh loudly" and gargarejar "to gargle".

      NeoGreek gargara, gargariso
      German gurgeln (& Gurgel)
      Latin gurgulio (& gurgatio + gurgitare).

      BTW, Mongolians and some neighboring Turkic peoples call /karkhiraa/,
      /khargyraa/, /kargyraa/ ("growling") some styles of /höömei/ [xöömej],
      i.e. the throat chanting/singing = overtone singing.

      *

      Is Engl. /harrumph/ onomatopoietic? Any link to the above?

      George
    • tigeradolf
      I think Albanian g�rthas (shout, yell) can be a cognate too. renders
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 5, 2013
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        I think Albanian "gërthas" (shout, yell) can be a cognate too. <th> renders <k'> so it can be reconstructed as Proto-Albanian *garkata

        --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "ufnkex" <guestuser9357@...> wrote:
        >
        > >korkorugmos remembers onomatopoeic verbs like Portuguese gargalhar
        > >"to laugh loudly" and gargarejar "to gargle".
        >
        > NeoGreek gargara, gargariso
        > German gurgeln (& Gurgel)
        > Latin gurgulio (& gurgatio + gurgitare).
        >
        > BTW, Mongolians and some neighboring Turkic peoples call /karkhiraa/,
        > /khargyraa/, /kargyraa/ ("growling") some styles of /höömei/ [xöömej],
        > i.e. the throat chanting/singing = overtone singing.
        >
        > *
        >
        > Is Engl. /harrumph/ onomatopoietic? Any link to the above?
        >
        > George
        >
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