Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

[tied] Re: Portuguese buraco "hole"

Expand Messages
  • Tavi
    ... añico), Coromines proposed as base a Celtic cognate of Latin pannus, *(p)anno-, so Galician / Portuguese (a)naco
    Message 1 of 22 , Jan 27, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "o_cossue" wrote:
      >
      > On Galician and dialectal Portuguese anaco (Portuguese naco, Spanish
      añico), Coromines proposed as base a Celtic cognate of Latin pannus,
      *(p)anno-, so Galician / Portuguese (a)naco < *anna:kku 'piece (of
      cloth) > piece (of something)', Galician esnacar ( < *ex-anakka:re ) 'to
      tear into pieces', Spanish añico < *anni:kku idem (heard only in the
      expression 'hacer añicos' = 'to tear into pieces').
      >
      Unfortuntaely, a link to Latin pannus can be ruled out because of the
      lack of Celtic cognates, not to mention semantic difficulties. In fact,
      Coromines proposed a root *ann- of unknown origin.

      However, I think *a- in Galician-Portuguese (a)naco, Spanish añicos
      is probably a fossilized prefix. The latter reminds me of Latin mi:ca
      'particle; bit, scrap, pinch' > Spanish miga 'crumble'. From an
      expressive variant *micca
      we've also got Catalan mica 'pinch' and esmicar (< *ex-micca:re),
      esmicolar 'to break into pieces'. I think the Latin word is a substrate
      loanword whose original meaning was 'grain' vel sim.
    • oalexandre
      ... añico), Coromines proposed as base a Celtic cognate of Latin pannus,*(p)anno-, so Galician / Portuguese (a)naco
      Message 2 of 22 , Aug 16 6:57 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        ---In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, <oalexandre@...> wrote :>
        > > On Galician and dialectal Portuguese anaco (Portuguese naco, Spanish
        añico), Coromines proposed as base a Celtic cognate of Latin pannus,*(p)anno-, so Galician / Portuguese (a)naco < *anna:kku 'piece (ofcloth) > piece (of something)', Galician esnacar ( < *ex-anakka:re ) 'totear into pieces', Spanish añico < *anni:kku idem (heard only in theexpression 'hacer añicos' = 'to tear into pieces').
        >> Unfortunately, a link to Latin pannus can be ruled out because of thelack of Celtic cognates, not to mention semantic difficulties. In fact,Coromines proposed a root *ann- of unknown origin.
        >
        He said that in his Breve diccionario etimológico de la lengua castellana, but at the same time he proposed a Celtic origin in the larger Diccionario crítico y etimológico español e hispánico (DCECH), coauthored with J.A. Pascual. So this would be one of the cases were Coromines contradicts himself.
        > However, I think *a- in Galician-Portuguese (a)naco, Spanish añicosis probably a fossilized prefix. The latter reminds me of Latin mi:ca'particle; bit, scrap, pinch' > Spanish miga 'crumble'. From anexpressive variant *micca we've also got Catalan mica 'pinch' and esmicar (< *ex-micca:re), esmicolar 'to break into pieces'. 
        >
        The form *mikka is also found in Occitan and Aragonese, with m- corresponding to n-, -nn- in *annakku ~ *nakku, *annikku
        > I think the Latin word is a substrate loanword whose original meaning was 'grain' vel sim.
        >
        I've deduced that meaning from Basque bikor, pikor 'grain, seed; garlic's section; chunk; peeble; grape (of fruits); a little', seemingly denasalized forms corresponding to mikor (S, R) 'fine bran', presumably derived from the Latin word.
        It looks like we've got an alternation mīca ~ *mikka like the one of bāca ~ bacca. 
         
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.