Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [tied] Re: Basque onddo

Expand Messages
  • Bhrihskwobhloukstroy
    This can be a general trend (although postalveo-palatal affricates are particularly rare and difficult in children s speech), but still can t predict why
    Message 1 of 206 , Nov 3, 2012
      This can be a general trend (although postalveo-palatal affricates are
      particularly rare and difficult in children's speech), but still can't
      predict why precisely onddo

      2012/11/3, Tavi <oalexandre@...>:
      > --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "Richard Wordingham"
      > <richard.wordingham@...> wrote:
      >>
      >> > Actually, this is a *sound law* by which some consonants, e.g. /t,
      >> > ts/ get into the corresponding palatals /c, tS/. At the same time, I
      >> > warned you against the confusion with other types of palatalization
      > common
      >> > in Romance.
      >>
      >> > > How is this Sound Law predictable?
      >>
      >> > You can see its "victims" are velar stops.
      >>
      >> This makes no sense. Are the 'victims' the starting point or the
      > outcome?
      >>
      > Sorry, I'd have said "targets" instead.
      >
      >> Also, you seem to be saying that the sound law applies if it applies.
      > Would you care to rephrase this coherently?
      >>
      > 1) In Basque (as well as in fossilized words or idiosyncratic speech in
      > Iberian Romances), there's a kind of expressive palatalization by which
      > coronal consonants become their corresponding palatals, as if mimicking
      > children's language. "Expressive" means it carries some kind of
      > affective or diminutive connotation.
      > 2) Velar stops can also suffer a similar palatalization, although in
      > most cases it can't be considered to be expressive. Quite often the
      > outcome is depalatalized, thus becoming a dental consonant.
      >
      >
      >
    • oalexandre
      ... From a statistical point of view, *sreu-m- can be found in Balto-Slavic, Albanian, Greek, Celtic and Germanic, while *reuH-m- is only found in Germanic.
      Message 206 of 206 , Jul 3, 2014
        ---In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, <octavianoaf24@...> wrote :
        >
        From a statistical point of view, *sreu-m- can be found in Balto-Slavic, Albanian, Greek, Celtic and Germanic, while *reuH-m- is only found in Germanic. This would imply the former etymology is preferrable, although the loss of *s- should be still accounted for.
        >
        I meant "a purely statistical" and "seems preferrable".
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.