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Re: [tied] Iseut/Isolde etymology: Celtic?

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  • Rick McCallister
    Sorry about my garbled memory, it s been years since I d read that. There should be some old posts on Tristrum and Isolde in the Cybalist archives --maybe
    Message 1 of 17 , Jan 5, 2012
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      Sorry about my garbled memory, it's been years since I'd read that. There should be some old posts on Tristrum and Isolde
      in the Cybalist archives --maybe about 8 or 10 years ago. I certainly remember putting my two cents in. Torsten is usually good at dredging up old posts. Now that I mention him, I wonder if Torsten is a Danish fold etymology for Tristen --you know, like Kristin becomes Kirstin ;p

      From: Joao S. Lopes <josimo70@...>
      To: "cybalist@yahoogroups.com" <cybalist@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, January 4, 2012 8:50 PM
      Subject: Re: [tied] Iseut/Isolde etymology: Celtic?

       
      I found some reference along Google, *ad-siltia.

      JS Lopes


      De: Joao S. Lopes <josimo70@...>
      Para: "cybalist@yahoogroups.com" <cybalist@yahoogroups.com>
      Enviadas: Quarta-feira, 4 de Janeiro de 2012 19:58
      Assunto: Re: [tied] Iseut/Isolde etymology: Celtic?

       
      Is *Ad-solita celtic?

      JS Lopes


      De: Rick McCallister <gabaroo6958@...>
      Para: "cybalist@yahoogroups.com" <cybalist@yahoogroups.com>
      Enviadas: Terça-feira, 3 de Janeiro de 2012 23:30
      Assunto: Re: [tied] Iseut/Isolde etymology: Celtic?

       
      Iseult is somewhere in the files Ad-solita (vel.sim) "she who must be looked it", i.e. the same as Miranda
      Tristan may be related to Pictish Drosten. I seem to remember reading that it meant "Prince"


      From: Joao S. Lopes <josimo70@...>
      To: Cybalist <cybalist@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, January 3, 2012 8:19 PM
      Subject: [tied] Iseut/Isolde etymology: Celtic?

       
      Is there a secure etymology for Iseut/Iseult, Isolde from Tristan & Isolde? Esyllt could derive from ON i:shilDr, but we could relate this name to Latin or Breton origin?

      JS Lopes








    • Torsten
      ... It s not a common name here, so there s no tradition around it, it s more common in Sweden. And in Germany, after the war. Torsten
      Message 2 of 17 , Jan 5, 2012
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        --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, Rick McCallister <gabaroo6958@...> wrote:
        >
        > Sorry about my garbled memory, it's been years since I'd read that. There should be some old posts on Tristrum and Isolde
        > in the Cybalist archives --maybe about 8 or 10 years ago. I certainly remember putting my two cents in. Torsten is usually good at dredging up old posts. Now that I mention him, I wonder if Torsten is a Danish fold etymology for Tristen --you know, like Kristin becomes Kirstin ;p

        It's not a common name here, so there's no tradition around it, it's more common in Sweden. And in Germany, after the war.


        Torsten
      • Rick McCallister
        Then that proves my point. If there s no tradition for Kirsten in Denmark, then Torsten must really be Tristen via scribal error (i o)  ;p
        Message 3 of 17 , Jan 5, 2012
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          Then that proves my point. If there's no tradition for Kirsten in Denmark, then Torsten must really be Tristen via scribal error (i > o)  ;p


          From: Torsten <tgpedersen@...>
          To: cybalist@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, January 5, 2012 9:52 PM
          Subject: Re: [tied] Iseut/Isolde etymology: Celtic?

           


          --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, Rick McCallister <gabaroo6958@...> wrote:
          >
          > Sorry about my garbled memory, it's been years since I'd read that. There should be some old posts on Tristrum and Isolde
          > in the Cybalist archives --maybe about 8 or 10 years ago. I certainly remember putting my two cents in. Torsten is usually good at dredging up old posts. Now that I mention him, I wonder if Torsten is a Danish fold etymology for Tristen --you know, like Kristin becomes Kirstin ;p

          It's not a common name here, so there's no tradition around it, it's more common in Sweden. And in Germany, after the war.

          Torsten



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