Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Portuguese buraco "hole"

Expand Messages
  • Torsten
    ... Alan Bomhard Indo-European and the Nostratic Hypothesis 2 Proto-Nostratic *bur-/*bor- to bore, to pierce PIE *b[h]or-/*b[h]ŗ- to bore, to pierce ;
    Message 1 of 22 , Jul 19, 2011
      --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "Joao S. Lopes" <josimo70@...> wrote:
      >
      > In Portuguese, buraco means "hole". Antenor Nascentes's Etymological Dictionary states some possibilities about its origin: from *furaco (cf. Portuguese furo, furar "pierce, to pierce"), and a connexion to Germanic bore. Any comment? Gothic? Celtic?


      Alan Bomhard
      Indo-European and the Nostratic Hypothesis

      2 Proto-Nostratic *bur-/*bor- "to bore, to pierce" >
      PIE *b[h]or-/*b[h]ŗ- "to bore, to pierce";
      Proto-Afro-Asiatic *bar-/ /*bər- "to bore, to pierce";
      Proto-Uralic *pura "borer, auger";
      Proto-Dravidian *pur- "to bore, to perforate; bore gimlet";
      Proto-Altaic *bur- "to bore through, to pierce";
      Sumerian bur "to bore through, to pierce".


      Torsten
    • Rick McCallister
      buraco looks like a Celtic cognate to English bore, if so, then furaco would likely be a Latin cognate BUT that s just my guess
      Message 2 of 22 , Jul 19, 2011
        buraco looks like a Celtic cognate to English bore, if so, then furaco would likely be a Latin cognate BUT that's just my guess 


        From: Joao S. Lopes <josimo70@...>
        To: Cybalist <cybalist@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tue, July 19, 2011 7:27:05 AM
        Subject: [tied] Portuguese buraco "hole"

         

        In Portuguese, buraco means "hole". Antenor Nascentes's Etymological Dictionary states some possibilities about its origin: from *furaco (cf. Portuguese furo, furar "pierce, to pierce"), and a connexion to Germanic bore. Any comment? Gothic? Celtic?


        Joao S. Lopes
      • Torsten
        ... Engl. furrow? ... Not likely, since http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/cybalist/message/67914 On admet souvent qu il y a ici un dérivé de la
        Message 3 of 22 , Jul 19, 2011
          >
          > In Portuguese, buraco means "hole". Antenor Nascentes's Etymological
          > Dictionary states some possibilities about its origin: from *furaco
          > (cf. Portuguese furo, furar "pierce, to pierce"), and a connexion to
          > Germanic bore. Any comment?
          > Gothic? Celtic?

          Engl. furrow?


          --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, Rick McCallister <gabaroo6958@...> wrote:
          >
          > buraco looks like a Celtic cognate to English bore, if so, then
          > furaco would likely be a Latin cognate BUT that's just my guess
          >
          Not likely, since
          http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/cybalist/message/67914
          'On admet souvent qu'il y a ici un dérivé de la préposition op-, ob- avec un suffixe *-āko-. Mais pareil suffixe n'est guère usuel en latin;...'

          which means that buraco and furaco are equally un-Latin. Are there any sets of systematic f-/b- alternations in Portuuese like this one, João?


          Torsten
        • Torsten
          ... Engl. furrow? ... Not likely, since http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/cybalist/message/67914 On admet souvent qu il y a ici un dérivé de la
          Message 4 of 22 , Jul 20, 2011
            --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "Torsten" <tgpedersen@...> wrote:
            >
            > In Portuguese, buraco means "hole". Antenor Nascentes's Etymological
            > Dictionary states some possibilities about its origin: from *furaco
            > (cf. Portuguese furo, furar "pierce, to pierce"), and a connexion to
            > Germanic bore. Any comment?
            > Gothic? Celtic?

            Engl. furrow?


            --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, Rick McCallister <gabaroo6958@> wrote:
            >
            > buraco looks like a Celtic cognate to English bore, if so, then
            > furaco would likely be a Latin cognate BUT that's just my guess

            Not likely, since
            http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/cybalist/message/67914
            'On admet souvent qu'il y a ici un dérivé de la préposition op-, ob- avec un suffixe *-āko-. Mais pareil suffixe n'est guère usuel en latin;...'

            which means that buraco and furaco are equally un-Latin. Are there any sets of systematic f-/b- alternations in Portuguese like this one, João?


            BTW, odd fact:

            Engl. burrow and furrow
            Port. buraco and furaco


            ???

            NWB? Ar-/ur- language?


            Torsten
          • Rick McCallister
            ________________________________ From: Torsten To: cybalist@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tue, July 19, 2011 8:07:42 PM Subject: Re: [tied]
            Message 5 of 22 , Jul 20, 2011



              From: Torsten <tgpedersen@...>
              To: cybalist@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tue, July 19, 2011 8:07:42 PM
              Subject: Re: [tied] Portuguese buraco "hole"

               



              >
              > In Portuguese, buraco means "hole". Antenor Nascentes's Etymological
              > Dictionary states some possibilities about its origin: from *furaco
              > (cf. Portuguese furo, furar "pierce, to pierce"), and a connexion to
              > Germanic bore. Any comment?
              > Gothic? Celtic?

              Engl. furrow?

              --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, Rick McCallister <gabaroo6958@...> wrote:
              >
              > buraco looks like a Celtic cognate to English bore, if so, then
              > furaco would likely be a Latin cognate BUT that's just my guess
              >
              Not likely, since
              http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/cybalist/message/67914
              'On admet souvent qu'il y a ici un dérivé de la préposition op-, ob- avec un suffixe *-āko-. Mais pareil suffixe n'est guère usuel en latin;...'

              which means that buraco and furaco are equally un-Latin. Are there any sets of systematic f-/b- alternations in Portuuese like this one, João?

              Torsten

              The -ako definitely looks Celtic on the face of it BUT the f- of furaco may well be from a Latin form that was reanalyzed. I've never seen f/b alternations in Ibero-Romance although b/m is common enough

            • Joao S. Lopes
              only waty to turn a Latin f- into a Portuguese b- would be a weird way *efura- *evura *vura- ~ *bura-, but it doesn t sounds likely. JS Lopes
              Message 6 of 22 , Jul 20, 2011
                only waty to turn a Latin f- into a Portuguese b- would be a weird way *efura- > *evura > *vura- ~ *bura-, but it doesn't sounds likely.

                JS Lopes


                De: Rick McCallister <gabaroo6958@...>
                Para: cybalist@yahoogroups.com
                Enviadas: Quarta-feira, 20 de Julho de 2011 17:27
                Assunto: Re: [tied] Portuguese buraco "hole"

                 



                From: Torsten <tgpedersen@...>
                To: cybalist@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Tue, July 19, 2011 8:07:42 PM
                Subject: Re: [tied] Portuguese buraco "hole"

                 


                >
                > In Portuguese, buraco means "hole". Antenor Nascentes's Etymological
                > Dictionary states some possibilities about its origin: from *furaco
                > (cf. Portuguese furo, furar "pierce, to pierce"), and a connexion to
                > Germanic bore. Any comment?
                > Gothic? Celtic?

                Engl. furrow?

                --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, Rick McCallister <gabaroo6958@...> wrote:
                >
                > buraco looks like a Celtic cognate to English bore, if so, then
                > furaco would likely be a Latin cognate BUT that's just my guess
                >
                Not likely, since
                http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/cybalist/message/67914
                'On admet souvent qu'il y a ici un dérivé de la préposition op-, ob- avec un suffixe *-āko-. Mais pareil suffixe n'est guère usuel en latin;...'

                which means that buraco and furaco are equally un-Latin. Are there any sets of systematic f-/b- alternations in Portuuese like this one, João?

                Torsten

                The -ako definitely looks Celtic on the face of it BUT the f- of furaco may well be from a Latin form that was reanalyzed. I've never seen f/b alternations in Ibero-Romance although b/m is common enough



              • Torsten
                ... You find p-/b- along with p-/f- alternation in NWB, according to Hans Kuhn, also in (the p-substrate of) Jysk
                Message 7 of 22 , Jul 21, 2011
                  >
                  > >
                  > > In Portuguese, buraco means "hole". Antenor Nascentes's
                  > > Etymological Dictionary states some possibilities about its
                  > > origin: from *furaco (cf. Portuguese furo, furar "pierce, to
                  > > pierce"), and a connexion to Germanic bore. Any comment?
                  > > Gothic? Celtic?
                  >
                  > Engl. furrow?
                  >
                  > --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, Rick McCallister <gabaroo6958@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > buraco looks like a Celtic cognate to English bore, if so, then
                  > > furaco would likely be a Latin cognate BUT that's just my guess
                  > >
                  > Not likely, since
                  > http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/cybalist/message/67914
                  > 'On admet souvent qu'il y a ici un dérivé de la préposition op-, ob-
                  > avec un suffixe *-āko-. Mais pareil suffixe n'est guère usuel en
                  > latin;...'
                  >
                  > which means that buraco and furaco are equally un-Latin. Are there
                  > any sets of systematic f-/b- alternations in Portuuese like this
                  > one, João?
                  >
                  > Torsten
                  >
                  >
                  > The -ako definitely looks Celtic on the face of it BUT the f- of
                  > furaco may well be from a Latin form that was reanalyzed. I've never
                  > seen f/b alternations in Ibero-Romance although b/m is common enough
                  >

                  --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "Joao S. Lopes" <josimo70@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > only waty to turn a Latin f- into a Portuguese b- would be a weird
                  > way *efura- > *evura > *vura- ~ *bura-, but it doesn't sounds
                  > likely.


                  You find p-/b- along with p-/f- alternation in NWB, according to Hans Kuhn, also in (the p-substrate of) Jysk
                  http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/cybalist/message/30336
                  The German cognate of 'furrow', 'Furche', cf Grimmm's Wörterbuch in
                  http://www.woerterbuchnetz.de/
                  matches it with Latin porca "ridge between two furrows after plowing", which again is connected to porcus "pig", in its role as "rooter, burrower (with its snout)", cf
                  http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/root
                  http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/wroeten
                  http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/rostrum

                  According to legend, the Limfjord was dug by a burrowing giant pig
                  http://www.thistedmuseum.dk/Historisk%20%C3%85rbog/%C3%85rgang%201929/Schmidt,%20August%20F.%20%20%20Lidt%20om%20Limfjorden.pdf

                  Grimm mentions the Germanic cognates of Latin 'porcus', OHG 'farh', 'farach' and German Ferkel "pig", and, interstingly with a variant 'barch' (and, FWIW, Proto-Austronesian, spoken in the area where the domestic pig comes from, has *beRek) and assumes a lost strong verb,
                  Gothic faírhan pret. sg. farh pl. faúrhun,
                  OHG fërhan pret. sg. farh pl. furhun,
                  meaning approx. "to root, burrow"

                  Feilberg's pirke/firke
                  http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/cybalist/message/30336
                  means "prod with a pointed object". I know only 'pirke' with a low variant 'perke'.

                  Do Port. 'buraco' and 'furaco' have any animal connections?

                  A *-Vk suffix is characteristic for (late) NWB, according to Kuhn, and *-k- for the ar-/ur- language (eg. the name of the ex-island Urk in the Zuiderzee), but they could of course be one and the same. A suffix -k- is characteristc of a group of verbs that stand apart in the Scandinavian languages (Da. dyrke, Sw. dyrka "cultivate", Sw. torka "dry", cf. torr adj. "dry").



                  Torsten
                • Tavi
                  ... Dictionary states some possibilities about its origin: from *furaco (cf. Portuguese furo, furar pierce, to pierce ), and a connexion to Germanic bore. Any
                  Message 8 of 22 , Sep 25, 2011
                    --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "Joao S. Lopes" <josimo70@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > In Portuguese, buraco means "hole". Antenor Nascentes's Etymological Dictionary states some possibilities about its origin: from *furaco (cf. Portuguese furo, furar "pierce, to pierce"), and a connexion to Germanic bore. Any comment? Gothic? Celtic?
                    >
                    In Galician, the form burato is also used besides buraco, an alternation like pataca ~ patata.

                    It can't derive from Latin foro: 'to pierce, to bore', whose participle fora:tum regularly gives furato. Neither it can't be from Celtic because there's no cognate verb there. And of course Gothic can be also ruled out. It must be an extinct pre-Celtic IE language.
                  • Rick McCallister
                    And that language is probably Lustianian ________________________________ From: Tavi To: cybalist@yahoogroups.com Sent: Sunday, September
                    Message 9 of 22 , Sep 25, 2011
                      And that language is probably Lustianian


                      From: Tavi <oalexandre@...>
                      To: cybalist@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Sunday, September 25, 2011 4:38 AM
                      Subject: [tied] Re: Portuguese buraco "hole"

                       
                      --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "Joao S. Lopes" <josimo70@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > In Portuguese, buraco means "hole". Antenor Nascentes's Etymological Dictionary states some possibilities about its origin: from *furaco (cf. Portuguese furo, furar "pierce, to pierce"), and a connexion to Germanic bore. Any comment? Gothic? Celtic?
                      >
                      In Galician, the form burato is also used besides buraco, an alternation like pataca ~ patata.

                      It can't derive from Latin foro: 'to pierce, to bore', whose participle fora:tum regularly gives furato. Neither it can't be from Celtic because there's no cognate verb there. And of course Gothic can be also ruled out. It must be an extinct pre-Celtic IE language.


                    • o_cossue
                      ... That´s a great word. In Galician it is also used the word buras ´holes in the base of a cart for inserting vertical bars´. Now, it would be nice to
                      Message 10 of 22 , Sep 27, 2011
                        --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, Rick McCallister <gabaroo6958@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > And that language is probably Lustianian
                        >
                        >
                        > ________________________________
                        > From: Tavi <oalexandre@...>
                        > To: cybalist@yahoogroups.com
                        > Sent: Sunday, September 25, 2011 4:38 AM
                        > Subject: [tied] Re: Portuguese buraco "hole"
                        >
                        >
                        >  
                        > --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "Joao S. Lopes" <josimo70@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > In Portuguese, buraco means "hole". Antenor Nascentes's Etymological Dictionary states some possibilities about its origin: from *furaco (cf. Portuguese furo, furar "pierce, to pierce"), and a connexion to Germanic bore. Any comment? Gothic? Celtic?
                        > >
                        > In Galician, the form burato is also used besides buraco, an alternation like pataca ~ patata.
                        >
                        > It can't derive from Latin foro: 'to pierce, to bore', whose participle fora:tum regularly gives furato. Neither it can't be from Celtic because there's no cognate verb there. And of course Gothic can be also ruled out. It must be an extinct pre-Celtic IE language.
                        >

                        That´s a great word. In Galician it is also used the word buras ´holes in the base of a cart for inserting vertical bars´. Now, it would be nice to derive it from a zero grade of *bher-3, but the fact is that the u bowel here asks for an etymom wit a long u, if the evolution is to be regular! Any suggestion?

                        Regards,
                        Froaringus
                      • o_cossue
                        ... BTW, -aco, from -a:kku(m) it´s an old suffix which shows itselfs in other substrate words: Galician anaco, Spanish añico ´fragment, bit´, Gal. cavaco
                        Message 11 of 22 , Sep 27, 2011
                          --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, Rick McCallister <gabaroo6958@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > And that language is probably Lustianian
                          >
                          >
                          > ________________________________
                          > From: Tavi <oalexandre@...>
                          > To: cybalist@yahoogroups.com
                          > Sent: Sunday, September 25, 2011 4:38 AM
                          > Subject: [tied] Re: Portuguese buraco "hole"
                          >
                          >
                          >  
                          > --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "Joao S. Lopes" <josimo70@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > In Portuguese, buraco means "hole". Antenor Nascentes's Etymological Dictionary states some possibilities about its origin: from *furaco (cf. Portuguese furo, furar "pierce, to pierce"), and a connexion to Germanic bore. Any comment? Gothic? Celtic?
                          > >
                          > In Galician, the form burato is also used besides buraco, an alternation like pataca ~ patata.
                          >
                          > It can't derive from Latin foro: 'to pierce, to bore', whose participle fora:tum regularly gives furato. Neither it can't be from Celtic because there's no cognate verb there. And of course Gothic can be also ruled out. It must be an extinct pre-Celtic IE language.
                          >

                          BTW, -aco, from -a:kku(m) it´s an old suffix which shows itselfs in other substrate words: Galician anaco, Spanish añico ´fragment, bit´, Gal. cavaco ´fragment of wood´, Gal. Spn. Port. V/Berraco ´male pig´, maybe Spanish urraca ´peg´...
                        • Joao S. Lopes
                          I think urraca also means magpie , and it was used as personal name by many Iberic princesses and queens. JS Lopes ________________________________ De:
                          Message 12 of 22 , Sep 28, 2011
                            I think urraca also means "magpie", and it was used as personal name by many Iberic princesses and queens.

                            JS Lopes


                            De: o_cossue <o.cossue@...>
                            Para: cybalist@yahoogroups.com
                            Enviadas: Terça-feira, 27 de Setembro de 2011 10:46
                            Assunto: [tied] Re: Portuguese buraco "hole"

                             


                            --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, Rick McCallister <gabaroo6958@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > And that language is probably Lustianian
                            >
                            >
                            > ________________________________
                            > From: Tavi <oalexandre@...>
                            > To: cybalist@yahoogroups.com
                            > Sent: Sunday, September 25, 2011 4:38 AM
                            > Subject: [tied] Re: Portuguese buraco "hole"
                            >
                            >
                            >  
                            > --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "Joao S. Lopes" <josimo70@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > In Portuguese, buraco means "hole". Antenor Nascentes's Etymological Dictionary states some possibilities about its origin: from *furaco (cf. Portuguese furo, furar "pierce, to pierce"), and a connexion to Germanic bore. Any comment? Gothic? Celtic?
                            > >
                            > In Galician, the form burato is also used besides buraco, an alternation like pataca ~ patata.
                            >
                            > It can't derive from Latin foro: 'to pierce, to bore', whose participle fora:tum regularly gives furato. Neither it can't be from Celtic because there's no cognate verb there. And of course Gothic can be also ruled out. It must be an extinct pre-Celtic IE language.
                            >

                            BTW, -aco, from -a:kku(m) it´s an old suffix which shows itselfs in other substrate words: Galician anaco, Spanish añico ´fragment, bit´, Gal. cavaco ´fragment of wood´, Gal. Spn. Port. V/Berraco ´male pig´, maybe Spanish urraca ´peg´...



                          • o_cossue
                            ... Of course, you re absolutely right: I meant magpie , not peg , sorry (as in Portuguese, Galician pega = magpie , LOL). Coromines considered it an
                            Message 13 of 22 , Sep 28, 2011
                              --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "Joao S. Lopes" <josimo70@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > I think urraca also means "magpie", and it was used as personal name by many Iberic princesses and queens.
                              >
                              > JS Lopes
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > ________________________________
                              > De: o_cossue <o.cossue@...>
                              > Para: cybalist@yahoogroups.com
                              > Enviadas: Terça-feira, 27 de Setembro de 2011 10:46
                              > Assunto: [tied] Re: Portuguese buraco "hole"
                              >
                              >
                              >  
                              >
                              >
                              > --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, Rick McCallister <gabaroo6958@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > And that language is probably Lustianian
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > ________________________________
                              > > From: Tavi <oalexandre@>
                              > > To: cybalist@yahoogroups.com
                              > > Sent: Sunday, September 25, 2011 4:38 AM
                              > > Subject: [tied] Re: Portuguese buraco "hole"
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >  
                              > > --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "Joao S. Lopes" <josimo70@> wrote:
                              > > >
                              > > > In Portuguese, buraco means "hole". Antenor Nascentes's Etymological Dictionary states some possibilities about its origin: from *furaco (cf. Portuguese furo, furar "pierce, to pierce"), and a connexion to Germanic bore. Any comment? Gothic? Celtic?
                              > > >
                              > > In Galician, the form burato is also used besides buraco, an alternation like pataca ~ patata.
                              > >
                              > > It can't derive from Latin foro: 'to pierce, to bore', whose participle fora:tum regularly gives furato. Neither it can't be from Celtic because there's no cognate verb there. And of course Gothic can be also ruled out. It must be an extinct pre-Celtic IE language.
                              > >
                              >
                              > BTW, -aco, from -a:kku(m) it´s an old suffix which shows itselfs in other substrate words: Galician anaco, Spanish añico ´fragment, bit´, Gal. cavaco ´fragment of wood´, Gal. Spn. Port. V/Berraco ´male pig´, maybe Spanish urraca ´peg´...
                              >

                              Of course, you're absolutely right: I meant 'magpie', not 'peg', sorry (as in Portuguese, Galician 'pega' = 'magpie', LOL). Coromines considered it an Iberian personal name, being later applied to the magpies. Incidentally, and as etymology matters, occasionally 'burraca' is heard even today in Andalusia.

                              On Galician and dialectal Portuguese anaco (Portuguese naco, Spanish añico), Coromines proposed as base a Celtic cognate of Latin pannus, *(p)anno-, so Galician / Portuguese (a)naco < *anna:kku 'piece (of cloth) > piece (of something)', Galician esnacar ( < *ex-ana:kkare ) 'to tear into pieces', Spanish añico < *anni:kku idem (heard only in the expression 'hacer añicos' = 'to tear into pieces').

                              Oldest attestation of 'buraco' in an obscene and satirical song by Johan Airas, XIIIth century: buraco. IMHO, the long /u:/ in the root is mandatory.

                              Finally, Coromines considered verraco 'male pig' as as derivative of Latim verres, although evidently the suffix was pre-Latin (he considered it to be Celtic).

                              Let's see if that helps.

                              Froaringus
                            • Rick McCallister
                              I ve only come across urraca magpie and as a medieval woman s name. I have seen barraco and verraco for pig ________________________________ From: Joao S.
                              Message 14 of 22 , Sep 28, 2011
                                I've only come across urraca "magpie" and as a medieval woman's name. I have seen barraco and verraco for "pig"


                                From: Joao S. Lopes <josimo70@...>
                                To: "cybalist@yahoogroups.com" <cybalist@yahoogroups.com>
                                Sent: Wednesday, September 28, 2011 7:14 AM
                                Subject: Re: [tied] Re: Portuguese buraco "hole"

                                 
                                I think urraca also means "magpie", and it was used as personal name by many Iberic princesses and queens.

                                JS Lopes


                                De: o_cossue <o.cossue@...>
                                Para: cybalist@yahoogroups.com
                                Enviadas: Terça-feira, 27 de Setembro de 2011 10:46
                                Assunto: [tied] Re: Portuguese buraco "hole"

                                 


                                --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, Rick McCallister <gabaroo6958@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > And that language is probably Lustianian
                                >
                                >
                                > ________________________________
                                > From: Tavi <oalexandre@...>
                                > To: cybalist@yahoogroups.com
                                > Sent: Sunday, September 25, 2011 4:38 AM
                                > Subject: [tied] Re: Portuguese buraco "hole"
                                >
                                >
                                >  
                                > --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "Joao S. Lopes" <josimo70@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > > In Portuguese, buraco means "hole". Antenor Nascentes's Etymological Dictionary states some possibilities about its origin: from *furaco (cf. Portuguese furo, furar "pierce, to pierce"), and a connexion to Germanic bore. Any comment? Gothic? Celtic?
                                > >
                                > In Galician, the form burato is also used besides buraco, an alternation like pataca ~ patata.
                                >
                                > It can't derive from Latin foro: 'to pierce, to bore', whose participle fora:tum regularly gives furato. Neither it can't be from Celtic because there's no cognate verb there. And of course Gothic can be also ruled out. It must be an extinct pre-Celtic IE language.
                                >

                                BTW, -aco, from -a:kku(m) it´s an old suffix which shows itselfs in other substrate words: Galician anaco, Spanish añico ´fragment, bit´, Gal. cavaco ´fragment of wood´, Gal. Spn. Port. V/Berraco ´male pig´, maybe Spanish urraca ´peg´...





                              • Tavi
                                ... (as in Portuguese, Galician pega = magpie , LOL). Coromines considered it an Iberian personal name, being later applied to the magpies. ... On the
                                Message 15 of 22 , Sep 29, 2011
                                  --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "o_cossue" <o.cossue@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Of course, you're absolutely right: I meant 'magpie', not 'peg', sorry (as in Portuguese, Galician 'pega' = 'magpie', LOL). Coromines considered it an Iberian personal name, being later applied to the magpies.
                                  >
                                  On the contrary, it's personal names which usually develop from nouns and not the other way around.

                                  > Incidentally, and as etymology matters, occasionally 'burraca' is heard even today in Andalusia.
                                  >
                                  Yes, and this suggests a protoform *burra-kka, possibly linked to Basque urra, purra '(interjection for calling) hens or pidgeons', as both magpies and hens have a similar "voice", that is, their names are often derived from the same (onomatopoeic) root, as in Celtic *kerka: 'hen' vs. Romance *karkea > Aragonese garza, Catalan garça 'magpie' (but notice that Spanish garza is 'heron').
                                • Tavi
                                  ... *-k- for the ar-/ur- language (eg. the name of the ex-island Urk in the Zuiderzee), but they could of course be one and the same. A suffix -k- is
                                  Message 16 of 22 , Jun 4, 2012
                                    --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "Torsten" <tgpedersen@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > A *-Vk suffix is characteristic for (late) NWB, according to Kuhn, and *-k- for the ar-/ur- language (eg. the name of the ex-island Urk in the Zuiderzee), but they could of course be one and the same. A suffix -k- is characteristc of a group of verbs that stand apart in the Scandinavian languages (Da. dyrke, Sw. dyrka "cultivate", Sw. torka "dry", cf. torr adj. "dry").
                                    >
                                    The suffix suffix *-a:ko- is frquent in Celtic (examples from Matasovic):

                                    *kalj-a:ko- 'rooster'
                                    *kell-a:ko- 'fight, war'
                                    *mark-a:ko- 'horseman'
                                    *must-a:ko- 'boy'
                                    *stirr-a:ko- 'small animal, chick'
                                    *ta:r-a:ko- 'tick, insect'
                                    *torr-a:ko- 'pregnant'
                                    *to-wiss-a:ko- 'chief, first'







                                  • Rick McCallister
                                    Then there s Michigan Celtic : Kellogg s To:
                                    Message 17 of 22 , Jun 4, 2012
                                      Then there's "Michigan Celtic": Kellogg's < *kalj-ako and Cadillac :p


                                      From: Tavi <oalexandre@...>
                                      To: cybalist@yahoogroups.com
                                      Sent: Monday, June 4, 2012 5:55 PM
                                      Subject: Re: [tied] Portuguese buraco "hole"

                                       
                                      --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "Torsten" <tgpedersen@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > A *-Vk suffix is characteristic for (late) NWB, according to Kuhn, and *-k- for the ar-/ur- language (eg. the name of the ex-island Urk in the Zuiderzee), but they could of course be one and the same. A suffix -k- is characteristc of a group of verbs that stand apart in the Scandinavian languages (Da. dyrke, Sw. dyrka "cultivate", Sw. torka "dry", cf. torr adj. "dry").
                                      >
                                      The suffix suffix *-a:ko- is frquent in Celtic (examples from Matasovic):

                                      *kalj-a:ko- 'rooster'
                                      *kell-a:ko- 'fight, war'
                                      *mark-a:ko- 'horseman'
                                      *must-a:ko- 'boy'
                                      *stirr-a:ko- 'small animal, chick'
                                      *ta:r-a:ko- 'tick, insect'
                                      *torr-a:ko- 'pregnant'
                                      *to-wiss-a:ko- 'chief, first'









                                    • Tavi
                                      ... Kellogg is OK, but where did you get Cadillac from?
                                      Message 18 of 22 , Jun 5, 2012
                                        --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, Rick McCallister <gabaroo6958@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > Then there's "Michigan Celtic": Kellogg's < *kalj-ako and Cadillac :p
                                        >
                                        Kellogg is OK, but where did you get Cadillac from?
                                      • Tavi
                                        ... añico), Coromines proposed as base a Celtic cognate of Latin pannus, *(p)anno-, so Galician / Portuguese (a)naco
                                        Message 19 of 22 , Jan 27, 2013
                                          --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "o_cossue" wrote:
                                          >
                                          > On Galician and dialectal Portuguese anaco (Portuguese naco, Spanish
                                          añico), Coromines proposed as base a Celtic cognate of Latin pannus,
                                          *(p)anno-, so Galician / Portuguese (a)naco < *anna:kku 'piece (of
                                          cloth) > piece (of something)', Galician esnacar ( < *ex-anakka:re ) 'to
                                          tear into pieces', Spanish añico < *anni:kku idem (heard only in the
                                          expression 'hacer añicos' = 'to tear into pieces').
                                          >
                                          Unfortuntaely, a link to Latin pannus can be ruled out because of the
                                          lack of Celtic cognates, not to mention semantic difficulties. In fact,
                                          Coromines proposed a root *ann- of unknown origin.

                                          However, I think *a- in Galician-Portuguese (a)naco, Spanish añicos
                                          is probably a fossilized prefix. The latter reminds me of Latin mi:ca
                                          'particle; bit, scrap, pinch' > Spanish miga 'crumble'. From an
                                          expressive variant *micca
                                          we've also got Catalan mica 'pinch' and esmicar (< *ex-micca:re),
                                          esmicolar 'to break into pieces'. I think the Latin word is a substrate
                                          loanword whose original meaning was 'grain' vel sim.
                                        • oalexandre
                                          ... añico), Coromines proposed as base a Celtic cognate of Latin pannus,*(p)anno-, so Galician / Portuguese (a)naco
                                          Message 20 of 22 , Aug 16 6:57 AM
                                            ---In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, <oalexandre@...> wrote :>
                                            > > On Galician and dialectal Portuguese anaco (Portuguese naco, Spanish
                                            añico), Coromines proposed as base a Celtic cognate of Latin pannus,*(p)anno-, so Galician / Portuguese (a)naco < *anna:kku 'piece (ofcloth) > piece (of something)', Galician esnacar ( < *ex-anakka:re ) 'totear into pieces', Spanish añico < *anni:kku idem (heard only in theexpression 'hacer añicos' = 'to tear into pieces').
                                            >> Unfortunately, a link to Latin pannus can be ruled out because of thelack of Celtic cognates, not to mention semantic difficulties. In fact,Coromines proposed a root *ann- of unknown origin.
                                            >
                                            He said that in his Breve diccionario etimológico de la lengua castellana, but at the same time he proposed a Celtic origin in the larger Diccionario crítico y etimológico español e hispánico (DCECH), coauthored with J.A. Pascual. So this would be one of the cases were Coromines contradicts himself.
                                            > However, I think *a- in Galician-Portuguese (a)naco, Spanish añicosis probably a fossilized prefix. The latter reminds me of Latin mi:ca'particle; bit, scrap, pinch' > Spanish miga 'crumble'. From anexpressive variant *micca we've also got Catalan mica 'pinch' and esmicar (< *ex-micca:re), esmicolar 'to break into pieces'. 
                                            >
                                            The form *mikka is also found in Occitan and Aragonese, with m- corresponding to n-, -nn- in *annakku ~ *nakku, *annikku
                                            > I think the Latin word is a substrate loanword whose original meaning was 'grain' vel sim.
                                            >
                                            I've deduced that meaning from Basque bikor, pikor 'grain, seed; garlic's section; chunk; peeble; grape (of fruits); a little', seemingly denasalized forms corresponding to mikor (S, R) 'fine bran', presumably derived from the Latin word.
                                            It looks like we've got an alternation mīca ~ *mikka like the one of bāca ~ bacca. 
                                             
                                          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.