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The City of Ravenna

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  • Alexandru Moeller
    I know there is no sure etymology about the name Ravenna in Italy and that some opinions are that the name of the city is of etruscan origin, some doubt about.
    Message 1 of 136 , Apr 30, 2011
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      I know there is no sure etymology about the name Ravenna in Italy and
      that some opinions are that the name of the city is of etruscan origin,
      some doubt about.
      I compared some details and I was a bit wondering to see that the name
      of Ravenna looks pretty appropiate to the Romanian Rovine(a place whose
      location is stil disputed since the historians knows that is was
      somewhere around the river Argesh but they don't know exactly where)
      Now, the name Rovine is not only phoneticaly appropiate to Ravenna but
      in its neighbourhood there is also the river which in antiquity was
      called Rhabon.
      Now, so far I remember the river Volga has too an ancient name and it
      was Rav ( or maybe is stil is the name Rav in the morvin language) and
      it is supposed to be cognate with scythian Rha which should be cognate
      with mithycal Sanskrit and Avestan rivers Rañha and Rasah..

      It can be there is a very big coincidence and the names are not related
      to each other but it can be there is a relation between these. The fact
      that there is an "-ine" in Romanian "Rovine" speaks for an double "nn"
      in the ancient times. *Rabenne/Rabenna could have been the form which
      yelded the Romanian "Rovine" ( *Ravenne>*Rãvîne>*Rovîne>Rovine). The
      vicinity of the ancient river Rhabon , the Italian Ravenna, the Rav
      river.. do we have here with some Indoeuropean denomination or it is
      maybe more older due its big geographical dispersal?



      Alex
    • Tavi
      ... Vaan] is cavea ... A borrowing from Etruscan seems likely. ... wooden ... Clearly we ve got here a bare root with a suffix. Actually, this is a good
      Message 136 of 136 , Dec 6, 2012
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        --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "Tavi" <oalexandre@...> wrote:
        >
        > Another Latin word incorrectly etymologized by Lubotsky's pupil [De
        Vaan] is cavea
        > 'cage', which he links to cavus 'hollow' following Varro.
        >
        A borrowing from Etruscan seems likely.

        > However, I'd
        > prefer a "pars pro toto" etymology from a root 'stick' found in:
        >
        > Kartvelian *k'ap'- 'stick; pole, post'
        > IE *g^obh- 'stick, branch' (Baltic, Germanic)
        > IE *ghabh-Vl- 'fork, branch' (Celtic, Germanic)
        > Altaic *kabari 'oar'
        > Sanskrit kú:bara-, kú:bari: 'the pole of a carriage or the
        wooden
        > frame to which the yoke is fixed', Greek kuberná:o 'to control, to
        > direct, to govern'
        >
        Clearly we've got here a bare root with a suffix.

        Actually, this is a good example for those who asked me for "evidence",
        although it has been conveniently ignored. Also notice IE
        reconstructions are given in the traditional notation.
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