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Re : [tied] Re: Morimarusa

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  • Torsten
    ... I can t assess the veracity of the story without knowing what the source of it says. The reference you provided doesn t give any, so I assume from the
    Message 1 of 241 , Jan 7, 2010
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      >
      > --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "Torsten" <tgpedersen@> wrote:
      > >
      > > --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "segijus" <segijus@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > There is written in
      > > > http://lt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balt%C5%B3_religin%C4%97s_reformos
      > > > that Cimbri lived in Gotland before Goths had come there.
      > > > Cimbri went to Semba then and have created Prussian nation
      > > > there.
      > >
      > > I haven't heard that legend before, but it seems from the
      > > discussion page
      > > http://lt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aptarimas:Balt%C5%B3_religin%C4%97s_reformos
      > > that the story is from Simon Grunau
      > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon_Grunau
      > > who might have gotten story from Erasmus Stella
      > > http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erasmus_Stella. FWIW.
      >
      > It can be that Pamare Balts, who escaped from Goths into Semba,
      > have created this legend.

      I can't assess the veracity of the story without knowing what the source of it says. The reference you provided doesn't give any, so I assume from the remarks on the discussion page that it's Simon Grunau. On the other hand, if it is a native tradition in Balticum, someone must have been the first to record it. Who? Unfortunately, since those medieval chroniclers are assumed a priori to tell only falsehoods, their chronicles are considered irrelevant and difficult to get access to. So unless I can get access to those original texts, I'll have to disregard the information on that Wikipedia page.

      > Did they call themselves Cimbri?

      No idea. You tell me.


      Torsten
    • Tavi
      ... Irish ... ethnonym ... (preferably in its ASCII or Latin-1 form), modified only where you think it misidentifies the correspondences of the sounds or
      Message 241 of 241 , May 11, 2012
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        --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "Richard Wordingham"
        <richard.wordingham@...> wrote:
        >
        > > Delamarre objects to this that *w┬║lkW-o- should have given Old
        Irish
        > > **flech and Gaulish **ulipos, so he links the Irish word to the
        ethnonym
        > > Uolcos 'falcon', which he relates to Latin falco: < *g^wol-k-
        > > (traditional *g^h), from a root *g^wel- 'to curve'.
        >
        > In the interests of clarity, please use the standard spelling
        (preferably in its ASCII or Latin-1 form), modified only where you think
        it misidentifies the correspondences of the sounds or phonemes involved.
        If you need to make a point about what you think the actual
        pronunciation was, use square brackets ([]). (I am speaking as a
        member, not a moderator.)
        >
        I don't think this is a matter of transcription/encoding as much as of
        the actual choice of the reconstructed phonemes. For reasons I stated
        before, I think classical "voiced aspirated" stops (series III) were
        actually *plain* voiced, so there's no point in perpetuating their
        corresponding symbols. IMHO, there're two possible choices for the PIE
        stop system, depending on if one includes glottalics or not:

        series I - voiceless (phonologically aspirated) / voiceless aspirated
        series II - glottalic / (unaspirated) voiceless
        series III - voiced

        The first system is the one reconstructed for Proto-Kartvelian and the
        second one for Proto-Altaic. The latter has the advantage as being more
        flexible as regarding the outcome of earlier glottalics, variable among
        paleo-dialects.
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