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Genus laci

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  • Trond Engen
    I had this idea. Then I had another one. More often than not my ideas are crap, but still: There are two Norwegian rivers Lågen
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 30, 2009
      I had this idea. Then I had another one. More often than not my ideas
      are crap, but still:

      There are two Norwegian rivers 'Lågen' < ON <lögr> < *lagú- (with Gmc.
      cognates meaning "lake"). The name is probably related to the word
      refected as Icel. 'lá' f. "water on the tidal sands", No. 'lå' f. "pit
      in bog", LG <la:> f. "pit, bog, wetland" < Gmc. *láho:- "still water?".
      There's also a raised bog (I think), an old oxbow lake (cut-off
      meander), near Hønefoss (in a third river basin) called 'Lamyra' "the
      /la/ bog".

      The two rivers named Lågen have both long parts of slow, still water,
      one meandering for long parts of its lower course, the other forming
      long wide river lakes on its way and ending in a shallow wetland with
      sands and back eddies. I want to propose that the suffix accented *lagú-
      is derived from the stem accented *láho:- with a resulting meaning close
      to "one with still water". Moreover, Norwegian rivers are feminine, so
      the gender is wrong. But it would be right for a lake. Thus, the name
      may originally have denoted the shallow, slow-flowing river-lakes, or
      perhaps oxbow lakes.

      Finally, could Gmc. *láho:- f. and *lagú- m. and their cognates OIr
      <loch> n. "lake", PSl. *loku:- "dam, cistern", Lat. <lacus> m. "lake,
      pool, basin" < PIE *lok- "an isolated stem meaning something with water"
      all be related to lat. <locus> "place" <- "placed", reflecting an
      earlier meaning "still (water)"?

      (Incidentally, for a parallel see the different meanings of the cognates
      of Eng. 'still'.)

      --
      Trond Engen
    • dgkilday57
      ... That seems reasonable enough, a PIE root *lek- still, slow-flowing vel sim. with derived nouns *lo ka:-, *loku -. ... Unfortunately Lat. comes
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 1, 2009
        --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, Trond Engen <trond@...> wrote:
        >
        > I had this idea. Then I had another one. More often than not my ideas
        > are crap, but still:
        >
        > There are two Norwegian rivers 'Lågen' < ON <lögr> < *lagú- (with Gmc.
        > cognates meaning "lake"). The name is probably related to the word
        > refected as Icel. 'lá' f. "water on the tidal sands", No. 'lå' f. "pit
        > in bog", LG <la:> f. "pit, bog, wetland" < Gmc. *láho:- "still water?".
        > There's also a raised bog (I think), an old oxbow lake (cut-off
        > meander), near Hønefoss (in a third river basin) called 'Lamyra' "the
        > /la/ bog".
        >
        > The two rivers named Lågen have both long parts of slow, still water,
        > one meandering for long parts of its lower course, the other forming
        > long wide river lakes on its way and ending in a shallow wetland with
        > sands and back eddies. I want to propose that the suffix accented *lagú-
        > is derived from the stem accented *láho:- with a resulting meaning close
        > to "one with still water". Moreover, Norwegian rivers are feminine, so
        > the gender is wrong. But it would be right for a lake. Thus, the name
        > may originally have denoted the shallow, slow-flowing river-lakes, or
        > perhaps oxbow lakes.

        That seems reasonable enough, a PIE root *lek- 'still, slow-flowing' vel sim. with derived nouns *lo'ka:-, *loku'-.

        > Finally, could Gmc. *láho:- f. and *lagú- m. and their cognates OIr
        > <loch> n. "lake", PSl. *loku:- "dam, cistern", Lat. <lacus> m. "lake,
        > pool, basin" < PIE *lok- "an isolated stem meaning something with water"
        > all be related to lat. <locus> "place" <- "placed", reflecting an
        > earlier meaning "still (water)"?
        >
        > (Incidentally, for a parallel see the different meanings of the cognates
        > of Eng. 'still'.)

        Unfortunately Lat. <locus> comes from OL <stlocus>, for which I have no etymology, and no principled way to connect it with *stel-. Likewise Lat. <li:s> 'lawsuit' comes from <stli:s>, again without etymology, and <locus> rhymes with <focus> 'fireplace', without etymology (known to me, anyhow).

        DGK
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