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Roderick

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  • Mark Odegard
    Can we find the rota word in Roderick etc? Something like wheel-king , chariot king ? ... _________________________________________________________________
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 14, 2001
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      Can we find the rota word in 'Roderick' etc? Something like 'wheel-king',
      'chariot king'?

      >But *hro:Ta-ri:ks is a rather common Germanic name. There were, for
      >example, numerous Rodericks of Gothic descent all over Europe. The element
      >*hro:T- does occur in names of Skjoldung rulers (cf. Hrothgar in Beowulf),
      >but not exclusively there; it was quite common in Frankish names, for
      >example. I don't see much logic in insisting that Rus or Varangian leaders
      >must have sported the *dynastic* names of whatever ethnic group they
      >derived from. It's a bit like claiming that an upper-class fellow called
      >Henry (Henri, Heinrich, Hendrik, Henryk, Imre, etc. in no matter what
      >language) must be British because the British have had eight kings with
      >that name.
      >
      >Piotr

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    • Miguel Carrasquer Vidal
      On Wed, 14 Feb 2001 14:54:39 -0600, Mark Odegard ... The * word appears to be southern Germanic only: German , Du. . In Dutch (and
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 14, 2001
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        On Wed, 14 Feb 2001 14:54:39 -0600, "Mark Odegard"
        <markodegard@...> wrote:

        >Can we find the rota word in 'Roderick' etc? Something like 'wheel-king',
        >'chariot king'?

        The *<rotHo> word appears to be "southern" Germanic only: German
        <Rad>, Du. <rad>. In Dutch (and Frisian) it's I suppose a Germanism,
        applied mostly to wheel-like objects *not* used in transportation
        (watermill, cogwheel, Wheel of Fortune), as opposed to <wiel>, which
        is what you have on cars and bikes.

        =======================
        Miguel Carrasquer Vidal
        mcv@...
      • Cohen, Izzy
        Miguel Carrasquer Vidal mcv@wxs.nl wrote: The * word appears to be southern Germanic only: German , Du. . In Dutch (and Frisian) it s I
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 15, 2001
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          Miguel Carrasquer Vidal mcv@... wrote:

          The *<rotHo> word appears to be "southern" Germanic only: German
          <Rad>, Du. <rad>. In Dutch (and Frisian) it's I suppose a Germanism,
          applied mostly to wheel-like objects *not* used in transportation
          (watermill, cogwheel, Wheel of Fortune), as opposed to <wiel>, which
          is what you have on cars and bikes.

          How about King of the Rou[n]d [table]? Compare King Arthur.
          Was this king overweight? Or Red-bearded?

          Roderick *looks* like breaKing Rich-ard and swapping the
          two pieces, but the break is in the wrong place to
          retain the meaning "Lion-Hearted". However, if you are
          willing to *reverse* the name, you can make it break
          correctly, as ChaRD-Ri --> Ro-DeRiCk = lion + heart.

          Good [k]night, :-)
          izzy_cohen@...

          PS: OS knecht, OHG kneht ~ reversal of aleph-resh-yod = lion,
          where yod = K, resh = N, and aleph = GHT.

          night < OE niht ~ Fris / Germ Nacht, OHG naht, ON natt, Go nahts,
          L nox / noct, nocturnal < ME nocturne < OE noctern < ML nocturna
          < L nocturnus = of the night, by night < noct / nox < Gk nyx
          ~ Hebrew nun-het na(x) = restful, quiescent het = X
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