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Query Re: Post-Postscript on Przeworsk

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  • tgpedersen
    ... The rest of us were quite perplexed at your placing Germanic somewhere in Siberia. Welcome to linguistics. ... Yes. The writers of antiquity have been most
    Message 1 of 149 , Apr 1, 2008
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      --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "fournet.arnaud" <fournet.arnaud@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > As regards the maps in wikipedia,
      > I'm quite perplexed by the alleged level
      > of geographical precision.

      The rest of us were quite perplexed at your placing Germanic somewhere
      in Siberia. Welcome to linguistics.


      > Is it really possible to reach such a precise
      > reconstruction of the positions of Germanic people ?

      Yes. The writers of antiquity have been most helpful.


      > It seems more precise that present-day mapping of Chadic.

      You might recall the standard classroom maps of Latin names of Gallic
      tribes, reconstructed from those same writers. (As I asked the owner
      of my favorite downtown cafe why she had that on the wall, she told me
      it was 200 years old and bought in France for 50,000 kr. People are
      strange)


      > And my next question would be about Germanic dialectology
      > Does the position of the people on the map reflect
      > the Germanic dialectal tree ?

      To answer that question we must find out what languages they spoke,
      which is one of the things George and myself are discussing. Watch
      this space.


      Torsten
    • Brian M. Scott
      ... Harrison & Harrison, _Surnames of the United Kingdom_, is not authoritative. It is in fact somewhat notorious for etymologizing on the modern forms of
      Message 149 of 149 , Oct 19, 2010
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        At 9:00:13 AM on Tuesday, October 19, 2010, Torsten wrote:

        > I don't want to open this thread again; I'm adding this
        > posting to the tree since I found an authoritative quote
        > on the subject, and I'd like to be able to locate that
        > quote in the future.

        > And it is:

        > Harrison & Harrison
        > Surnames of the United Kingdom:
        > a concise etymological dictionary
        > http://tinyurl.com/3al7ffz

        Harrison & Harrison, _Surnames of the United Kingdom_, is
        not authoritative. It is in fact somewhat notorious for
        etymologizing on the modern forms of surnames, and this
        entry is an example. <Pendegast> is from <Prendergast>, the
        name of a village and parish in Pembrokeshire and, as
        <Prenderguest>, of what is now a farm in Berwickshire; early
        instances of the byname include <de Prendergat'> 1225, <de
        Prendrogest> 1354, <de Prendergest> ~1170, ~1240, 1325, and
        <de Prendregast> 1296. The Scottish place-name is
        associated at an early date with an Anglo-Norman family who
        may have brought it from Wales. The etymology is unknown,
        but the name is apparently P-Celtic, and the first element
        may be <pren> 'tree'.

        Brian
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