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Re: Re: [tied] Gemination in Celtic

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  • fournet.arnaud
    ... From: Rick McCallister To: cybalist@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2008 8:50 AM Subject: Re: Re: [tied] Gemination in Celtic ok but akouter is
    Message 1 of 302 , Apr 1, 2008
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      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Rick McCallister
      To: cybalist@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2008 8:50 AM
      Subject: Re: Re: [tied] Gemination in Celtic


      ok but akouter is from Latin,
      *smakk- acquired a prothetic vowel in standard French

      but perhaps not in N. French.
      Check it out
      How does N. French treat Gmc toponyms beginning in sC-
      (C for any clustered consonant)?
      Note that the Norman French changed the endearing name
      of Snottingham into Nottingham --or so I've read, and
      I think there was a Stuttingham > Tuttingham (vel
      sim.)
      So if Norman French did something similar in England,
      something analogous may have occured in N. French.

      ============

      Ecuires < skura (Saxon)
      Etaples < stapel (Dutch)
      Escalles < skali
      Estournel < strumel
      Estrun < strom
      Escobecques < skaldu-bek

      There are clear examples
      with a e i o ou
      that initial vowels never fall.

      Arnaud
      =============
    • dgkilday57
      ... I like your mechanism better than opt. loss of *h2. However (and I may have missed something earlier), I am still puzzled by the lack of Olsen s
      Message 302 of 302 , Feb 23, 2012
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        --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, Piotr Gasiorowski <gpiotr@...> wrote:
        >
        > W dniu 2012-02-22 22:15, dgkilday57 pisze:
        >
        > > But the acute accent requires a short vowel, so it must be zero-grade.
        >
        > In the reconstructible PIE pattern one normally expects e-grade and root
        > accent in the neuter and zero-grade and final accent in the collective,
        > so the original pattern may have been /*gWéh2-tro-m/ --> *gWáh2tHrom,
        > */gWh2-tré-h2/ --> *gW&2tráh2, levelled out in Greek (which generally
        > does not preserve the accentual contrast), with the accent and the
        > consonants of the original singular and the short vowel of the collective.

        I like your mechanism better than opt. loss of *h2. However (and I may have missed something earlier), I am still puzzled by the lack of Olsen's h1/h2-preaspiration everywhere but in this particular suffix. We do not see it with *h1 in Lat. <-ple:tus>, Skt. <pra:ta'-> 'full', or with *h2 in Skt. <ga:tu's> 'gait, way', Grk. <be:tarmo's> 'dance', <amphisbe:te'o:> 'I stride', which have the same root as above. Proposing a new soundlaw to eliminate one or two otherwise independent suffixes seems rather heavy-handed.

        DGK
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