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Re: [tied] Re: Torsten's theory reviewed

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  • Brian M. Scott
    ... [...] ... Olof von Feilitzen, The Pre-Conquest Personal Names of Domesday Book, p. 255, n. 2: (gen.) c. 965 BCS 1168;
    Message 1 of 149 , Mar 30, 2008
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      At 6:19:24 PM on Tuesday, March 25, 2008, tgpedersen wrote:

      > In 'Warist, Werstine und Werstein' Kuhn tries to show that
      > many Germanic names in ending in
      > -stein/-steen/-sta:n/-sten are reinterpretations of pre-
      > and non-Germanic names in ending in -st-, and that this is
      > shown in the sets of matching -st/-stein etc of personal
      > names, etnonyms and toponyms:

      > "

      [...]

      > To corrobsorate this I have to digress shortly into the
      > history of personal names with st-suffix. On the continent
      > they enjoyed more importance than the ones on -stein. In
      > the North, however, where these latter were rather
      > frequent, the former are not documented, and also in
      > England there are only a few tangible ones. Without
      > support in the genuine vocabulary seem only Ribrost and
      > Unust, but those two might have been Celts. The well-known
      > Hengest is a native appellative and only semi-legendary.
      > To my knowledge there remains only Leofusta, which might
      > or should be understood as superlative to leof "dear", and
      > Fregist/Frigist which seems to contain OE gist "guest",
      > although this is very rare in the old English personal
      > names. Among the few -gist names I noticed there are
      > Friþe-/Fryþe-gist which could be reshaped from Frigist,
      > and Ere-gist, with a completely isolated first element.

      Olof von Feilitzen, The Pre-Conquest Personal Names of
      Domesday Book, p. 255, n. 2:

      <Fryðegistes> (gen.) c. 965 BCS 1168; <Frithegist
      minister> 970 BCS 1266; <Frithe-, Friðegist> 971 BCS 1270
      (2 persons); <Fr(i)þe-, Friþegist> 973 BCS 1297 (2
      persons); <Friðe-, Fryðgistes>, <Fryðegystes> (3x),
      <-gistes> (3x) 972-92 BCS 1130, the father of <Æðelwald>
      and <Osferð>; <Friðegist> ASC (E, F) 993, <Fryþegyst> ib.
      C, D, who was of Danish descent according to FlW i. 151:
      »duces exercitus, Frana videlicet, Frithogist, et
      Godwinus, quia ex paterno genere Danici fuerunt»;
      <Friðegist minister> 1005 KCD 714; <(Arkil filius)
      Fridegisti> 11th c. Sim. Durh. i. 220. Post-Conq examples
      are <Friðegist>, <Frithcigt>, mon. Chester, Wm I (Brooke
      16); <Frithegist magnus> 1088 LVD 77 (YNR); <Fredegesti>
      (gen) late Hy II DCh 269 (Li); also in the Li field-name
      <Fred(e)gestdaile> 1312 ChR (Lindkvist 32). For a
      possible instance in the list of bp Ælfric's festermen see
      Lindkvist AB 33.135. In spurious charters (Ingulph) we
      find <Fregistus miles> 806 BCS 325, 819 ib. 365,
      <Frigistus miles> ib. 365, <Eregisti militis> 823 BCS 409,
      851 ib. 461, 868 ib. 521, <Erithegistus minister> 966 ib.
      1179. Since <Thorold de Bokenhale>, the 11th c. sheriff
      of L (< Þóraldr q.v.) and <Geolphus filius Malti> (DB
      Iaulf Maltesune < Iólfr q.v.) appear in the majority of
      these charters, it seems reasonable to assume that
      Ingulph's <Fregist> is identical with the 1066 L tenant
      and with <Fregistus> on the »Guthlac scroll» (c. 1150),
      one of the benefactors of Crowland Abbey; cf. F.M. Page,
      The Estates of Crowland Abbey, p. 5 ff. and plate I.

      The name appears in DB as <Friguist>, <Fredgist>, and
      <Fregist>, in Lancs., Yorks., and Northants. It appears to
      be a borrowing of ON *<Friðgestr>, ODan <Fredegæst>; while
      <Friðgestr> isn't recorded in OWN sources, several other
      names in <-gestr> are. The late <Fred-> spellings are
      influenced by WFrank. names in <Fred(e)->, doubtless
      including <Fredegis>. <Eregist> and <Erithegistus> are
      apparently just errors for <Fregist> and <Frithegistus>.

      Brian
    • Brian M. Scott
      ... Harrison & Harrison, _Surnames of the United Kingdom_, is not authoritative. It is in fact somewhat notorious for etymologizing on the modern forms of
      Message 149 of 149 , Oct 19, 2010
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        At 9:00:13 AM on Tuesday, October 19, 2010, Torsten wrote:

        > I don't want to open this thread again; I'm adding this
        > posting to the tree since I found an authoritative quote
        > on the subject, and I'd like to be able to locate that
        > quote in the future.

        > And it is:

        > Harrison & Harrison
        > Surnames of the United Kingdom:
        > a concise etymological dictionary
        > http://tinyurl.com/3al7ffz

        Harrison & Harrison, _Surnames of the United Kingdom_, is
        not authoritative. It is in fact somewhat notorious for
        etymologizing on the modern forms of surnames, and this
        entry is an example. <Pendegast> is from <Prendergast>, the
        name of a village and parish in Pembrokeshire and, as
        <Prenderguest>, of what is now a farm in Berwickshire; early
        instances of the byname include <de Prendergat'> 1225, <de
        Prendrogest> 1354, <de Prendergest> ~1170, ~1240, 1325, and
        <de Prendregast> 1296. The Scottish place-name is
        associated at an early date with an Anglo-Norman family who
        may have brought it from Wales. The etymology is unknown,
        but the name is apparently P-Celtic, and the first element
        may be <pren> 'tree'.

        Brian
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